What Baseball Player

Baseball Encyclopedia of Major League Players

  • Search the Baseball-Reference.com Baseball Encyclopedia of Players by the first letter of the player’s last name, or enter the player’s first and last names in the search box at the top of this page. The players on this list are among the most sought-after in the world. Bold signifies a current player, while + indicates a member of the Hall of Fame. HENRY AARON AND LUIIS APARICO AND ROBERTO ALOMAR AND ELVIS ANDRUS AND LUKE APPLIN AND JOSE ALTUVE AND Earl AVERILL AND NOLAN ARENADO AND RICHIE ASHBURN AND JAKE ARRIETA AND …
  • Yogi Berra +, George Brett +, Ernie Banks +, Johnny Bench +, Jim Bunning +, Wade Boggs +, Craig Biggio +, Madison Bumgarner +, Harold Baines +, Lou Brock +,. Jaime Cabrera, Rod Carew (plus), Robinson Cano (plus), Steve Carlton (plus), Nelson Cruz (plus), Gary Carter (plus), Orlando Cepeda (plus), Roy Campanella (plus), Johnny Cueto (plus)
  • .
  • DBobby Doerr +,Joe DiMaggio +,Bill Dickey +,Don Drysdale +,Andre Dawson +,Larry Doby +,Leon Day +,Ian Desmond,Jacob deGrom,Josh Donaldson,.
  • EDennis Eckersley +,Alcides Escobar,Buck Ewing +,Eduardo Escobar,Johnny Evers +, – It’s a long list, but it includes names like: José Iglesias, Ender Inciarte, Jason Isringhausen, Raizel Iglesias, Cesar Izturis, Frank Isbell,Hisashi Iwakuma, Omar Infante, Raul Ibanez and many others. The following are the players: JDerek Jeter +,Reggie Jackson +,Randy Johnson +,Chipper Jones +,Walter Johnson +,Fergie Jenkins +,Kenley Jansen,Travis Jackson +,Jon Jay,Bob Johnson,.
  • KAl Kaline +,Harmon Killebrew +,Clayton Kershaw,George Kell +,Jim Kaat +,Sandy Koufax +,Scott Kazmir,Ralp Andy McCutchen.
  • MWillie Mays +,Stan Musial +,Mickey Mantle +,Yadier Molina,Eddie Mathews.
  • Juan Marichal.
  • Minnie Minoso +,Johnny Mize +,Greg Maddux.
  • – .
  • OMel Ott +,David Ortiz +,Tony Oliva +,Buck O’Neil +,Al Oliver,Jim O’Rourke +,Paul O’Neill,Marcell Ozuna,Claude Osteen,Rougned Odor +,Buck O’Neil +,Al Oliver,Jim O’Rourke +,Paul O’Neill,Marcell Ozuna,Claude Osteen,Rougned – Joe Quinn,Humberto Quintero,Kevin Quackenbush,Frank Quilici,Tom Quinn,.
  • RBrooks Robinson +,Cal Ripken Jr. +,Ivan Rodriguez +,Frank Robinson +,Mariano Rivera +,Nolan Ryan +,Red Ruffing +,Robin Roberts +,Alex Rodriguez,.
  • RBrooks Robinson -,Cal Ripken Jr. +,Ivan Rodriguez +,Frank “SWarren Spahn and Ozzie Smith and Tom Seaver and Max Scherzer and Mike Schmidt and Ryne Sandberg and Red Schoendienst and John Smoltz and Enos Slaughter and Ervin Santana and “.
  • – .
  • UJustin Upton,Chase Utley,Dan Uggla,Jose Urena,Juan Uribe,George Uhle,Gio Urshela,Jose Uribe,Julio Urias,Ted Uhlaender,.
  • VJustin Upton,Chase Utley,Dan Uggla,Jose Urena,Juan Uribe Baseball players Justin Verlander (left) and Joey Votto (right). Baseball players Arky Vaughan (right) and Dazzy Vance (left). Baseball players Fernando Valenzuela (left), Omar Vizquel (right), Mickey Vernon (left), Johnny Vander Meer (right), Jonathan Villar (left), Stephen Vogt (right). .
  • WTed Williams +,Dave Winfield +,Early Wynn +,Adam Wainwright,Hoyt Wilhelm +,Willie Wells +,Paul Waner +,Larry Walker +,Billy Williams +,Mickey Welch +,.
  • X
  • YCarl Yastrzemski +,Robin Yount +,Cy Young +,Christian Yelich,Michael Young,Ro –

10 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time

  • Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto/Thinkstock The crack of the bat, how I love it. The fragrance of freshly cut grass. You’re munching on Cracker Jack while trying to avoid getting splattered by the big drink that the intoxicated fan sitting behind you is barely holding on to. Nothing exactly captures the essence of summer quite like baseball, the national pastime of the United States. In part, baseball’s prominence in the American psyche stems from the game’s lengthy history and the overall constancy of the game across time
  • It’s highly possible that your great-great-grandfather would be able to readily follow a current game if he were miraculously transported to the stands. Because of this history and consistency, it is a little simpler to compare players from vastly different eras than it is to do so in other sports, which is exactly what I will be aiming to do in this article. Let’s see how things turn out.

Roger Clemens

  • Roger Clemens is a baseball player from the United States. Roger Clemens, published in 2007. Photograph courtesy of D. Silva/Shutterstock.com For his remarkable 24-year career, Roger Clemens earned a record seven Cy Young Awards, each for the best pitcher of the year in either the American or National League, and hurled 4,672 strikeouts, which ranks third all-time in the major leagues. His 24–4 record with a 2.48 earned run average (ERA) and 238 strikeouts for the Boston Red Sox in 1986 earned him the league MVP title, making him one of the few starting pitchers to have done so in the modern era. Furthermore, he accomplished all of this while a large percentage of opposing hitters were using steroids, which resulted in offensive numbers that were skyrocketing at the time of his performance. So why isn’t he ranked any higher? Because it’s quite possible that Clemens himself used steroids, his exploits aren’t as as remarkable as they appear to be given the time period in which they occurred. In addition, he’s quite probably the guy I’ve despised the most during my baseball fandom, so he earns a well-deserved spot on this list, but he can’t go much higher for fear of rendering this list incomplete by hurling my computer out a window in a fit of rage. Congratulations on your subjectivity.

Honus Wagner

  • Honus Wagner is a German composer. Honus Wagner is a composer from Germany. Culver Pictures is a production company based in Los Angeles, California. A large majority of current baseball fans are perhaps most familiar with Honus Wagner as the subject of the most valuable baseball card in history, the T206 Wagner card from the American Tobacco Company, which was issued in 1909–11. The fact that the card is so rare is a major factor in its ability to garner upwards of $2 million in a sale, but it wouldn’t be nearly as valuable if the person shown on it was simply another average player, rather than one of the greatest players to ever tread on a diamond. In his career, “The Flying Dutchman” (gosh, they came up with such catchy titles back in the day) led the National League in batting average eight times and retired with a stellar.328 mark, despite playing during the offense-sapping “dead-ball period” that plagued the game. At the time of his retirement in 1917, he had amassed the second-highest totals in major-league history in terms of hits (3,420), doubles (643), triples (252), and runs batted in (1,732), all of which are currently in the top 25 all-time totals. In the 1936 balloting for the first class of the Baseball Hall of Fame, Wagner was one of five players picked for that distinction from among the hundreds of players who had competed in the game up to that time
  • This was a mark of his excellence.

Stan Musial

  • Stan Musial is a musician and composer from the United States. Stan Musial in 1964, courtesy of AP Images “Stan the Man,” who was very probably the best individual on our list, was a historically outstanding athlete who also happened to be a model citizen. In addition to having spent his entire 22-season professional baseball career with the city’sCardinals organization, the belovedSt. Louisicon has become as closely associated with his hometown as any athlete has ever been. Stan Musial led the Cardinals to three World Series championships (1942, 1944, and 1946), while also winning three MVP honors (1943, 1946, and 1948) and compiling a lifetime batting average of.331 in his career with the team. It is worth noting that Musial’s greatest single-season strikeout total was a meager 46 in 505 plate appearances when he was 41 years old and starting in the Cardinals’ outfield as proof of his good eye for the ball. (He still had a.330 batting average that year.) “I’ve had very good luck with Stan by throwing him my best pitch and backing up third,” pitcher Carl Erskine said of Stan’s hitting, which was so steady that opponents frequently accepted their destiny.

Ty Cobb

  • Ty Cobb is a baseball player that was born in the state of Georgia. Photographic Parade of Ty Cobb And now, here’s what may be the most dramatic drop-off in humanity in the history of list-items. Ty Cobb was the nasty troll beneath the bridge who threw stones at passing children, but Musial was the fairy-tale prince when it came to manners. While Cobb was an unrepentant racist who routinely sharpened his spikes in order to maximize the potential injury to opponents on hard slides and who once fought a fan in the stands, he was also a supremely talented player who holds the record for the highest lifetime batting average in major-league history. Cobb was born in Georgia and raised in Texas (.366). His batting average in the American League (AL) was absurdly high 12 times during his 24-year career, but he was far more than just an average hitter, as he also led the AL in slugging percentage (a statistic that measures a batter’s power production) on eight separate occasions during his 24-year career. He batted over.400 in three consecutive seasons (1911,.420
  • 1912,.409
  • And 1922,.401), and he retired in 1928 as the all-time leader in hits (4,189), runs scored (2,246), and stolen bases (892), all of which were broken only in the late twentieth or early twenty-first centuries
  • He also retired as the all-time leader in runs scored (2,246), and stolen bases (892).

Walter Johnson

  • Walter Johnson is an American businessman and philanthropist. Walter Johnson is a fictional character created by author Walter Johnson. UPI/Bettmann Photographic Archive The hurling of flames A generational talent, Walter Johnson set the standard for dominate pitching for several decades. He was so dominant that he consistently led the American League in strikeouts, finishing first in the league 12 times during his 21-year professional career. Pitching for the Washington Senators for his entire professional career, “Big Train” tossed 110 career complete-game shutouts, which is still the most in major-league history and a mark that will never be surpassed by anyone else. (As of this writing, Clayton Kershaw is the current active leader with 15 wins in eight and a half seasons.) As a result of his 36 wins, 1.14 earned run average, and incredible 0.78 WHIP (walks and hits per inning pitched
  • A WHIP of less than 1.00 is regarded exceptional), he was named the Chalmers Award winner, the equivalent of today’s American League MVP. In 1924, he was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player after leading the Senators to their first World Series title. Johnson’s 3,509 career strikeouts set a record that stood for 56 years, and his 417 victories are second only to Cy Young’s 511 in the major leagues.
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Hank Aaron

  • Hank Aaron is a baseball player from the United States. Hank Aaron is a baseball player from the United States. Parade of Photographs As the holder of the Home Run King title for more than a generation, Hank Aaron is sometimes seen as little more than a phenomenal power hitter, albeit probably one of the finest ever. Hank Aaron’s 755 career home runs (a record that has stood for 33 years) are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to “Hammerin’ Hank.” The fact that he has an all-time high of 2,297 runs batted in and 6,856 total bases is indicative of his legendary power, but he has also put together a respectable body of work. His batting average was 305, and he was awarded three Gold Gloves for his outfield performance. Aaron was a consistent all-star, having been named to the All-Star Game for 21 consecutive seasons and hitting at least 30 home runs in 15 of those seasons. Beyond his career records, Aaron concluded his playing days with the second-most hits (3,771) and second-highest number of runs scored (2,174) in major-league history at the time of his retirement in 1976.

Ted Williams

  • Ted Williams has been referred to as “the best pure hitter who ever lived” for a long time. With a lifetime on-base percentage of.482, he ranks among the all-time greats, and despite missing nearly five full seasons of his peak due to military duty, his total runs scored, home runs, runs batted in, and walks rank among the top 20 among active players. His remarkable eye earned him the nickname “The Splendid Splinter” (see what I mean about the nicknames?) and helped him score a.400 hitting average in his final major-league season, which was the best in the league at the time (.406 in 1941). Over the course of his 19-year career, the Boston Red Sox’s batting average was the best in the American League six times, his slugging percentage was the best nine times, and his on-base percentage was the best twelve times. Beyond being the best hitter in history, Williams has also been dubbed the finest fisherman and fighter pilot of all time, among other accolades. His connection with the public was notoriously tense, despite his numerous honors (or possibly because of them). However, as noted by renowned author John Updike after Williams declined to come out for a curtain call after hitting a home run in his final professional at bat: “Gods do not respond to letters.”

Barry Bonds

  • Barry Bonds is a baseball player from the United States. On August 7, 2007, Barry Bonds hit his 756th career home run, breaking the previous record. Photo credit: Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images Yes, I get what you’re saying. He was cantankerous, preening, and probably certainly a steroid user—not exactly the type of man who should be given the benefit of the doubt and win the number three slot on this list, but he did. According to many baseball fans, Barry Bonds is the poster boy for the drug era and the perceived impropriety of the practices that characterized it. The fact is that before being accused of using steroids, he was already an unquestionable Hall of Famer. Steroids, on the other hand, would have had no effect on his unparalleled eye-hand coordination, which resulted in an all-time high 2,558 career walks and a staggering.444 lifetime on-base percentage. You can never be certain of the exact influence that drugs have on a baseball player’s performance, and that is the problem with steroids. As a result, let’s just take a moment to appreciate the incredible numbers Bonds accumulated: an unrivaled 762 home runs (including a single-season record 73 in 2001), a record seven career MVP awards, and 688 intentional walks, which is more than double that of the player with the second-highest total of all time and a striking testament to the unparalleled fear Bonds instilled in opposing pitchers.

Willie Mays

  • ‘Baby Bonds’ is a baseball player from the United States who is most known for his baseball career. The 756th home run of Barry Bonds’ career was hit on August 7, 2007, tying the previous record. Lisa Blumenfeld is a contributor to Getty Images I get what you’re saying. He was cantankerous, preening, and probably certainly a steroid user—not exactly the type of man who should be given the benefit of the doubt and win the number three slot on this list, but he was. According to many baseball fans, Barry Bonds is the poster boy for the drug era and the perceived impropriety of the practices that occurred during that time. The fact is that before being accused of using steroids, he was already an unquestionable Hall of Famer. Steroids, on the other hand, would have had no effect on his unparalleled eye-hand coordination, which resulted in an all-time high 2,558 career walks and a staggering.444 career on-base percentage. You can never tell with certainty what effect drugs have on a baseball player’s performance, and that is one of the problems with steroids. As a result, let’s just take a moment to appreciate the incredible numbers Bonds accumulated: an unrivaled 762 home runs (including a single-season record 73 in 2001), a record seven career MVP awards, and 688 intentional walks, which is more than double that of the player with the second-highest total of all time and a striking testament to the unparalleled fear Bonds instilled in opposing pitchers

Babe Ruth

  • Babe Ruth was a baseball player who played in the Major Leagues. Babe Ruth was a baseball player who played in the Major Leagues. UPI/Bettmann Photographic Archive As far as I’m concerned, this is as simple as they come. Yes, he competed in an artificially limited talent pool before Jackie Robinson broke down the color barrier in 1947 and decades before advanced training regimens produced athletes who looked like, well, athletes, but Ruth was such a historically significant talent that he transcends these limitations to become a legendary player. In fact, his entry into the major leagues was so seismic that it heralded the end of the dead-ball era in professional baseball. Upon entering the majors in 1914, the all-time record for home runs in a season was 27 at the time of his arrival. It was only seven years later that he had more than doubled it to 59, and he went on to hit a career-high of 60 dingers in the same year. In total, he led the American League in home runs 12 times. In fact, his astounding.690 lifetime slugging percentage still ranks as the greatest in baseball history, with a difference between it and second place that is higher than the distance between second and ninth place. During his early years, the Babe also excelled as a pitcher, leading the American League with a 1.75 earned run average in 1921 and pitching 29 and two-thirds consecutive scoreless innings across two World Series —because when you dominate the game to such an extent as the Babe did, you might as well dominate it in all aspects, right? Ruth was also known as the “first transcendent American sports superstar,” earning national attention for both his on-field accomplishments and his off-field popularity, and he was widely regarded as such. It was through his work with the famed New York Yankees teams of the twenties that baseball gained the prominence in the public mind that it continues to enjoy today. Besides being the greatest baseball player of all time, Babe Ruth was also the most important of all.

Top 100 MLB players of all time

Babe Ruth was a baseball player who played in the Major Leagues from 1939 until 1945. Babe Ruth was a baseball player who played for the New York Yankees during the World Series. Archive from the UPI/Bettmann As far as I’m concerned, this is as simple as it gets. While it is true that Ruth competed in an artificially limited talent pool prior to Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in 1947 and decades before advanced training regimens produced athletes who looked like.athletes, Ruth was such a historically significant talent that he transcends these limitations.

He entered the major leagues in 1914 with the all-time record of 27 home runs in a season.

In total, he was the American League’s leading home run hitter on 12 occasions throughout his career.

During his early years, the Babe also excelled as a pitcher, leading the American League with a 1.75 earned run average in 1921 and pitching 29 and two-thirds consecutive scoreless innings across two World Series —because when you dominate the game to such an extent as the Babe did, you might as well do so in all aspects, right?

Baseball’s rise to popularity in the public awareness during his time with the storiedNew York Yankeesteams of the 1920s was aided by his contributions to those squads.

The Methodology

We picked an initial pool of more than 200 players from both the major leagues and the Negro Leagues, stretching back to the late nineteenth century, as well as a handful of today’s top stars, based on their career WAR, Hall of Fame status, peak performance, and overall contributions to the game. From there, we enlisted the help of hundreds of ESPN editors and writers to contribute to a balloting mechanism that pitted players from the list against one another in a head-to-head vote competition.

Would you rather have Barry Bonds or Ted Williams on your team?

Is it better to root for Walter Johnson or Roger Clemens?

On the basis of such votes, the players were ranked according to the proportion of the time they were picked above any other competing player.

1 overall player was selected 99 percent of the time in our league. Our 100th player, for example, was selected 31 percent of the time. However, despite the seeming wide range of results, the competition was tough; a single percentage point might drastically affect a player’s placing.

The Top 100

Here is our list, which was given in three parts: numbers 100 to 51, numbers 50 to 26 and numbers 25 to 1.

Home

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MLBPA Press Room

Major League Baseball’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program (2017-2021) is governed by a collective bargaining agreement between the MLBPA and MLB.

Gallery

Licensees and sponsors who wish to link their brands and goods with Major League Baseball can do so through the MLBPA’s group licensing scheme, which takes advantage of the collective marketing power of all Major League Baseball players in order to aid licensees and sponsors. ​

Agents

It is the single and exclusive negotiating agent for all Major League Baseball players, as well as people who are ready to negotiate a Major League contract, and it is known as the Major League Baseball Players Association (“MLBPA”). Only MLBPA GeneralCertified Agents have the authority to represent or advise a player in the negotiation of the terms of a Major League contract with the organization. Manhattan, New York, NY 100172 12 East 49th Street, 24th Floor 12.826.0808 / 212.826.0809 / 12.826.0808 / 212.826.0809 / 12.826.0808 / 212.826.0809

Major Leaguers Played in LLBWS

Many of today’s current baseball players are among the more than 50 alumni of the Little League Baseball World Series who have gone on to play at the top level of the game. The following is a list of the stars who have had the opportunity to compete in the Little League International Complex in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, as well as on the largest stage in the world, the Major League Baseball field. * Indicates that the player competed in the Little League and Major League World Series. ** Indicates that the player competed in the Little League World Series, College World Series, and Major League World Series, as well as the College World Series.

Wilson Alvarez

’82 was the year that I graduated from LLBWS (Coquivacoa LL, Maracaibo, Venezuela) ’89-’05 in the Major League Baseball (Texas, Chicago White Sox, San Francisco, Tampa Bay, LA Dodgers)

Jim Barbieri *

LLBWS: 1953 and 1954 (National LL, Schenectady, N.Y.) ’66 season of Major League Baseball (Los Angeles)

Jason Bay

LLBWS graduated in 1990. (Trail LL, Trail, B.C.) Major League Baseball (MLB): 2003-2013 (San Diego, Pittsburgh, Boston, N.Y. Mets, Seattle)

Cody Bellinger *

LLBWS: the year 2007 (Chandler National LL, Chandler, Ariz.) MLB: 2017 season (preliminary) (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Derek Bell *

Loyola Law School for Women (LLBWS): 1980-1981 (Belmont Heights LL, Tampa, Fla.) MLB: ’91 to ’01 (Toronto, San Diego, Houston, N.Y. Mets, Pittsburgh)

Christian Bethancourt

’04 was the year of the LLBWS (Curundu LL, Panama City, Panama) MLB: ’13 through ’17 (Atlanta, San Diego)

Larvell Blanks

’62 was the year of the LLBWS (Val Verde County LL, Del Rio, Texas) 1972-1980 (Major League Baseball) (Atlanta, Cleveland, Texas)

Sean Burroughs

LLBWS (1992-1993) (Long Beach LL, Long Beach Calif.) MLB: 2002-2006, 2011-2012 The San Diego Chargers, Tampa Bay Lightning, Arizona Cardinals, and Minnesota Vikings are among the teams in the league.

Kevin Cash

LLBWS: 1989; LLBWS: 1990 (Northside LL, Tampa, Fla.) MLB: 2002-2005, 2007-2010 Houston Astros, Toronto Blue Jays, Tampa Bay Rays, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees

Gavin Cecchini

’06 was the year of the LLBWS (South Lake Charles LL, Lake Charles, La.) MLB: ’16 season (preliminary) (N.Y. Mets)

Chin-Feng Chen

In 2006, I graduated from LLBWS (South Lake Charles LL, Lake Charles, La.) Preliminary draft picks for the 2016 MLB season (N.Y. Mets)

Jeff Clement

’96 was the year of the LLBWS (Marshalltown National LL, Marshalltown, Iowa) MLB seasons 2007-2010, 2012 (Seattle, Pittsburgh)

Billy Connors

In 1954, the LLBWS was established (National LL, Schenectady, N.Y.) ’66-’68 in Major League Baseball (Chicago Cubs, N.Y. Mets)

Michael Conforto**

’04 was the year of the LLBWS (Redmond North LL, Redmond, Wash.) College: Oregon State University (’13). MLB: ’15 pre-season (N.Y. Mets)

Brian Esposito

LLBWS: ’91; LLBWS: ’92 (South Shore American LL, Staten Island, N.Y.) MLB: 2007 and 2010. (St. Louis, Houston)

Stephen Fife

In 1991, I graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Writing (South Shore American LL, Staten Island, N.Y.) The Major League Baseball seasons of 2007 and 2010 (St. Louis, Houston)

Jeff Frazier

LL.B.W.S. : 1995 (Toms River American LL, Toms River, N.J.) MLB: the year ’10 (Detroit)

Todd Frazier

’98 was the year of the LLBWS (Toms River American LL, Toms River, N.J.) MLB: ’11-premier league (Cincinnati, N.Y. Yankees, N.Y. Mets, Texas)

Jace Fry

In 1998, I graduated from LLBWS (Toms River American LL, Toms River, N.J.) Major League Baseball: ’11-premier (Cincinnati, N.Y. Yankees, N.Y. Mets, Texas)

Randal Grichuk

’98 was the year of graduation from LLBWS (Toms River American LL, Toms River, N.J.) MLB: ’11-premier league’ (Cincinnati, N.Y. Yankees, N.Y. Mets, Texas)

Ben Hayes

LLBWS: ’70 (Weisbaden, Germany) LL)MLB: ’82-83 (Weisbaden, Germany) (Cincinnati)

Charlie Hayes *

’77 was the year that I graduated from LLBWS (Hub City LL, Hattiesburg, Miss.) MLB: ’88 to ’01 (San Francisco, Philadelphia, N.Y. Yankees, Colorado, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Houston)

Yonny Hernandez

2011 (Gran Maracay, Venezuela) LL LLBWS (Gran Maracay, Venezuela) LLBWS (Gran Maracay, Venezuela) Major League Baseball: ’21-premier’ (Texas)

Ken Hubbs

In 1954, the LLBWS was established (Lions Club LL, Colton, Calif.) ’61-’63 in the Major League Baseball (Chicago Cubs)

Erik A. Johnson

LL.B.W.S. : 1978 (San Ramon Valley LL, Danville, Calif.) 1993-1994 Major League Baseball (San Francisco)

Scott Kingery

’06 was the year of the LLBWS (Ahwatukee American LL, Phoenix, Ariz.) MLB: ’18 season (preliminary) (Philadelphia)

Keith Lampard

In 2006, I graduated from LLBWS (Ahwatukee American LL, Phoenix, Ariz.) In the Major League Baseball, the year 2018 is the present (Philadelphia)

Adam Loewen

’96 was the year of the LLBWS (Kennedy-Surrey LL, Surrey, B.C.) MLB seasons 2006-2008, 2015-16 (Baltimore, Philadelphia, Arizona)

Carney Lansford *

In 1969, LLBWS was established (Briarwood LL, Santa Clara, Calif.) 1978-1992 (Major League Baseball) (California, Boston, Oakland)

Vance Lovelace

In 1975, LLBWS was established (Belmont Heights LL, Tampa, Fla.) ’88-’90 in the Major League Baseball (California, Seattle)

Lance Lynn *

LLBWS: the year 1999 (Brownsburg LL, Brownsburg, Ind.) MLB: ’11-premier league (St. Louis, Minnesota, N.Y. Yankees, Texas)

Jason Marquis *

LLBWS: ’91; LLBWS: ’92 (South Shore American, Staten Island, N.Y.) MLB: 2000-2013, 2015 (Atlanta, St. Louis, Chicago Cubs, Colorado, Washington, Arizona, Minnesota, San Diego, Cincinnati)

Lloyd McClendon

In 1971, I graduated from LLBWS (Anderson LL, Gary, Ind.) From 1987 until 1994, I played in the Major League Baseball (Cincinnati, Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh)

Lastings Milledge

In 1997, I graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration (Manatee G.T. Brey East LL, Bradenton, Fla.) The Major League Baseball season runs from 2006 through 2011. (N.Y. Mets, Washington, Pittsburgh, Chicago White Sox)

Bobby Mitchell

’67 was the year I graduated from LLBWS (Northridge City LL, Northridge, Calif.) ’80s and ’83s Major League Baseball (Los Angeles, Minnesota)

Max Moroff

LLBWS: the year 2005 (Maitland LL, Maitland, Fla.) MLB: ’16 season (preliminary) (Pittsburgh, Cleveland)

Jim Pankovits

’68 was the year of the LLBWS (Tuckahoe LL, Richmond, Va.) ’84-’90 in the Major League Baseball (Houston, Boston)

Francisco Peña

’01 was the year of the LLBWS (Rolando Paulino LL, Bronx, N.Y.) MLB: ’14 to ’18 (Kansas City, Baltimore, St. Louis)

Yusmeiro Petit *

’94 was the year that I graduated from LLBWS (Coquivacoa LL, Maracaibo, Venezuela) MLB: 2006 until the present (Florida, Arizona, San Francisco, Washington, Anaheim, Oakland)

Marc Pisciotta

LL.B.W.S. : 1983 (East Marietta National, Marietta, Ga.) MLB seasons 1997-1999 (Chicago Cubs, Kansas City)

Boog Powell *

In 1954, the LLBWS was established (Orange LL, Lakeland, Fla.) ’61-’77 in Major League Baseball (Baltimore, Cleveland, Los Angeles)

Jurickson Profar

’04 was the year of the LLBWS (Pabao LL, Willemstad, Curacao) Baseball: ’12-13, ’16-present (Texas; Oakland)

Guillermo Quiroz

’94 was the year that I graduated from LLBWS (Coquivacoa LL, Maracaibo, Venezuela) MLB seasons 2004-2010 (Toronto, Seattle, Texas, Baltimore)

Colby Rasmus

LLBWS: the year 1999 (Phenix City National, Phenix City, Ala.) MLB seasons 2009-2018 (St. Louis, Toronto, Houston, Tampa Bay, Baltimore)

Cory Rasmus

LLBWS: the year 1999 (Phenix City National, Phenix City, Ala.) MLB: ’13 through ’16. (Atlanta, Anaheim)

Brady Rodgers

’03 was the year of the LLBWS (Lamar LL, Richmond, Texas) MLB: ’16 season (preliminary) (Houston)

Michael Saunders

LLBWS: the year 1999 (Gordon Head LL, Victoria, British Columbia) MLB: 2009 through 2017 (Seattle, Toronto, Philadelphia, Kansas City)

Jonathan Schoop

’04 was the year of the LLBWS (Pabao LL, Willemstad, Curacao) MLB: ’13 season (preliminary) (Baltimore, Milwaukee, Minnesota, Detroit)

Gary Sheffield *

’80 was the year of the LLBWS (Belmont Heights LL, Tampa, Fla.) ’88-’09 in Major League Baseball (Milwaukee, San Diego, Florida, Los Angeles, Atlanta, N.Y. Yankees, Detroit, N.Y. Mets)

Andrew Stevenson

LLBWS: the year 2005 (Lafayette LL, Lafayette, La.) MLB: 2017 season (preliminary) (Washington)

Carl Taylor

In 1954, the LLBWS was established (Orange LL, Lakeland, Fla.) ’68-’73 in Major League Baseball (Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Kansas City)

Ruben Tejada

’01 was the year of the LLBWS (Activo 20-30 LL, Santiago, Panama) Major League Baseball: “10-pres” (N.Y.

Mets, St. Louis, San Francisco, Baltimore, Toronto)

Clete Thomas

’96 was the year of the LLBWS (R. L. Turner LL, Panama City, Fla.) MLB seasons 2008-09 and 2012-13 (Detroit, Minnesota)

Hector Torres

’58 was the year of the LLBWS (Industrial LL, Monterrey, Mexico) ’68-’77 in Major League Baseball (Houston, Chicago Cubs, Montreal, San Diego, Toronto)

Devon Travis

’03 was the year of the LLBWS (East Boynton Beach LL, Boynton Beach, Fla.) MLB: ’15 pre-season (Toronto)

George Tsamis

LL.B.W.S. : ’79 (Campbell LL, Campbell, Calif.) ’93 season of Major League Baseball (Minnesota)

Jason Varitek **

In 1984, I graduated from LLBWS (Almonte Springs National LL, Almonte Springs, Fla.) College: Georgia Institute of Technology (’94). Major League Baseball (MLB): 1997-2011 (Boston)

Dave Veres

LL.B.W.S. : 1978 (Torrejon Air Base, Madrid, Spain) Baseball: 1994-2003 (Houston, Montreal, Colorado, St. Louis, Chicago Cubs)

Ed Vosberg **

’73 was the year of the LLBWS (Cactus LL, Tucson, Ariz.) Arizona State University (’80) MLB: 1986-1990, 1994-1997, 1999-2002 (San Diego, San Francisco, Oakland, Texas, Florida, Arizona, Philadelphia, Montreal)

Dan Wilson

’81 was the year that I graduated from LLBWS (Barrington LL, Barrington, Ill.) 1992-2005 (Major League Baseball) (Cincinnati, Seattle)

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Rick Wise *

’58 was the year of the LLBWS (Rose City LL, Portland, Ore.) ’64-’82 in Major League Baseball (Philadelphia, St. Louis, Boston, Cleveland, San Diego) NOTE: If you are aware of a noteworthy Little League alumni who would fall into one of these categories, please let us know by completing ourLittle League Alumni Submission Form (available here).

Baseball Player Careers

A baseball player engages in the sport of baseball. I’m willing to bet you could have predicted it. Despite the fact that only a small number of individuals are able to perform this for a career, we have included it in this book since it is a dream job for many people. This globally contested sport draws millions of fans from all around the world, who like, trust, and respect the guys who compete in the sport. Lower league baseball and big league baseball are two separate and quite different stages in a baseball player’s career: the minor leagues and the major leagues.

  1. Baseball players train in exotic areas like as Toledo, Norwalk, and Columbus, where they follow their trainers’ directions and improve their baseball abilities, as well as their overall conditioning and emotional maturity.
  2. The hours drag on.
  3. Many take on extra occupations during the off-season to supplement their income, which may be difficult with a pay of around $180/week.
  4. Many players stay late after practices and games to improve on their talents, strength training, and fitness, among other things.
  5. Their luggage is not transported by them.
  6. A minimum of one hour before game time is necessary for players to arrive prepared to play, to be in decent physical condition, and to comply with all instructions from the management and coaches.
  7. They have little job security; a serious injury, such as a torn ligament or an eye condition, that prohibits a player from performing at his or her peak might spell the end of a professional career for them.

The same outcome may be achieved on a less spectacular level by performing inconsistently and losing the confidence of your management.

Paying Your Dues

A baseball player is someone who participates in the sport. I’m willing to bet you could have guessed. This is included in this book even though it is just a dream job for a small number of individuals. We chose to include it since it is a dream job for many. This globally contested sport draws millions of fans from all around the world, who appreciate, trust, and respect the guys who compete in the competition. The minor leagues and the major leagues are two distinct and very different stages in a baseball player’s career.

  • The baseball players practice under the supervision of their instructors in places as diverse as Toledo, Norwalk, and Columbus, developing specialized baseball skills, general conditioning, and emotional maturity as well as overall character.
  • We have a lot of time.
  • The majority of players work part-time jobs during the off-season to supplement their income, which may be difficult with a wage of around $180 per week.
  • In order to improve their abilities, strength, and conditioning, many players stay late after practices and games.
  • Their luggage is not transported by them.
  • In order to participate in a game, players must arrive at least one hour before the scheduled start time, be in appropriate physical condition, and comply with all instructions from the management and coaching staff.
  • They have little job security; a serious injury, such as a torn ligament or an eye condition, that prohibits a player from performing at his or her peak might spell the end of a professional career for that individual.

Present and Future

Alex Cartwright (not Abner Doubleday as many people believe) was the guy who developed baseball, an American variant of the English game of cricket, in 1845. Since 1903, the world championship (formerly known as the American League championship) has been held in baseball. Among major sports, baseball has had the most substantial worldwide fan base development (although basketball is quickly catching up to baseball in terms of popularity), and it is particularly popular in the Caribbean region.

Baseball is in a state of emergency.

There was no agreement in place for the balance of the 1994 season, thus the game went on.

When it comes to baseball, the size and commitment of the fan base defines demand for the sport, and when it comes to baseball, demand for the sport determines revenues received by the sport, and the revenues received by the sport decide the wages earned by big league baseball players.

Quality of Life

In the lower leagues, players are developing their talents and working with other potential stars. At this time, superstars and veteran minor-leaguers are treated equally, which fosters a sense of togetherness. Promotion is dependent on performance, and many candidates must develop emotionally and physically before being considered. They must also work on honing their abilities. If a player fails and gets dismissed from a single-A club, it is extremely tough to re-enter the baseball world.

FIVE YEARS OUT

Five-year veterans have progressed at the very least to double-A minor league baseball and have specialized in a single position on the baseball field. They work with strength coaches, flexibility coaches, hitting teachers, fielding instructors, and pitching coaches to develop their abilities at the highest level possible. The vast majority of prospects with extraordinary skill get promoted to the major leagues by this point, but only a small number of them have considerable major league experience by this point.

The majority of people do not make it this far.

TEN YEARS OUT

Ten-year veterans have lived the life of a movie star, surviving in the major leagues, appearing in front of hundreds of thousands of fans, and achieving at least moderate celebrity status on television and in the press. With their greatest years in the rearview mirror, the vast majority of accomplished athletes are nearing the end of their careers. Those who have five years of major-league playing time are eligible for Players’ Association pension funds, which may provide a living wage for the rest of their lives to a marginal major-league player’s family.

MLB Baseball Players

ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF PLAYERSALPHABETICAL LISTING OF PLAYERSG

Player Pos Team Num Height Weight DOB
Gallagher, Cam C KC 36 6’3″ 230 lbs 12/6/92
Gallegos, Giovanny(R) RP STL 65 6’2″ 215 lbs 8/14/91
Gallen, Zac(R) SP ARI 23 6’2″ 189 lbs 8/3/95
Gallo, Joey LF NYY 13 6’5″ 250 lbs 11/19/93
Gamel, Ben LF PIT 18 5’11” 180 lbs 5/17/92
Garcia, Avisail RF MIA 6’4″ 250 lbs 6/12/91
Garcia, Bryan(R) RP DET 33 6’1″ 205 lbs 4/19/95
Garcia, Jarlin(L) RP SF 66 6’3″ 215 lbs 1/18/93
Garcia, Jose Adolis RF TEX 53 6’1″ 205 lbs 3/2/93
Garcia, Leury CF CHW 28 5’8″ 190 lbs 3/18/91
Garcia, Luis(R) SP HOU 77 6’1″ 244 lbs 12/13/96
Garcia, Luis(R) RP SD 6’2″ 240 lbs 1/30/87
Garcia, Luis SS WAS 2 6’2″ 224 lbs 5/16/00
Garcia, Luis SS PHI 5’11” 170 lbs 10/1/00
Garcia, Maikel SS KC 6’0″ 145 lbs 3/3/00
Garcia, Rony(R) RP DET 51 6’3″ 200 lbs 12/19/97
Garcia, Yimi(R) RP TOR 63 6’2″ 228 lbs 8/18/90
Gardner, Brett LF NYY 11 5’11” 195 lbs 8/24/83
Garneau, Dustin C DET 64 6’2″ 205 lbs 8/13/87
Garrett, Amir(L) RP CIN 50 6’5″ 239 lbs 5/3/92
Garrett, Braxton(L) SP MIA 60 6’2″ 202 lbs 8/5/97
Garver, Mitch C MIN 8 6’1″ 220 lbs 1/15/91
Garza, Ralph(R) RP MIN 32 6’2″ 220 lbs 4/6/94
Gausman, Kevin(R) SP TOR 34 6’2″ 190 lbs 1/6/91
Gerber, Joey(R) RP SEA 59 6’4″ 215 lbs 5/3/97
German, Domingo(R) SP NYY 55 6’2″ 181 lbs 8/4/92
Gibson, Kyle(R) SP PHI 44 6’6″ 215 lbs 10/23/87
Gil, Luis(R) RP NYY 81 6’2″ 185 lbs 6/3/98
Gilbert, Logan(R) SP SEA 36 6’6″ 225 lbs 5/5/97
Gilbert, Tyler(L) SP ARI 49 6’3″ 223 lbs 12/22/93
Gilbreath, Lucas(L) RP COL 58 6’1″ 185 lbs 3/5/96
Giles, Ken(R) RP SEA 58 6’3″ 210 lbs 9/20/90
Gillaspie, Logan(R) SP BAL 6’2″ 220 lbs 4/17/97
Gimenez, Andres SS CLE 0 6’0″ 161 lbs 9/4/98
Giolito, Lucas(R) SP CHW 27 6’6″ 245 lbs 7/14/94
Glasnow, Tyler(R) SP TB 20 6’8″ 225 lbs 8/23/93
Godoy, Jose C SEA 78 5’11” 200 lbs 10/13/94
Goldschmidt, Paul 1B STL 46 6’3″ 220 lbs 9/10/87
Gomber, Austin(L) SP COL 26 6’5″ 220 lbs 11/23/93
Gomes, Yan C CHC 10 6’2″ 212 lbs 7/19/87
Gomez, Yoendrys(R) SP NYY 89 6’3″ 175 lbs 10/15/99
Gonsolin, Tony(R) SP LAD 26 6’3″ 205 lbs 5/14/94
Gonzales, Marco(L) SP SEA 7 6’1″ 197 lbs 2/16/92
Gonzalez, Romy SS CHW 5 6’1″ 215 lbs 9/6/96
Gonzalez, Victor(L) RP LAD 81 6’0″ 180 lbs 11/16/95
Gordon, Nick SS MIN 1 6’0″ 160 lbs 10/24/95
Gore, MacKenzie(L) SP SD 6’2″ 197 lbs 2/24/99
Gose, Anthony(L) RP CLE 26 6’0″ 200 lbs 8/10/90
Gott, Trevor(R) RP MIL 5’10” 182 lbs 8/26/92
Goudeau, Ashton(R) RP COL 60 6’6″ 220 lbs 7/23/92
Grandal, Yasmani C CHW 24 6’2″ 225 lbs 11/8/88
Graterol, Brusdar(R) RP LAD 48 6’1″ 265 lbs 8/26/98
Graveman, Kendall(R) RP CHW 6’2″ 200 lbs 12/21/90
Gray, Jon(R) SP TEX 6’4″ 225 lbs 11/5/91
Gray, Josiah(R) SP WAS 40 6’1″ 190 lbs 12/21/97
Gray, Sonny(R) SP CIN 54 5’10” 195 lbs 11/7/89
Green, Chad(R) RP NYY 57 6’3″ 215 lbs 5/24/91
Greene, Hunter(R) SP CIN 6’4″ 197 lbs 8/6/99
Gregorius, Didi SS PHI 18 6’3″ 205 lbs 2/18/90
Grichuk, Randal CF TOR 15 6’2″ 216 lbs 8/13/91
Grisham, Trent LF SD 2 5’11” 224 lbs 11/1/96
Groome, Jason(L) SP BOS 77 6’6″ 262 lbs 8/23/98
Grossman, Robbie LF DET 8 6’0″ 209 lbs 9/16/89
Grove, Michael(R) SP LAD 6’3″ 200 lbs 12/18/96
Guenther, Sean(L) SP MIA 66 5’11” 194 lbs 12/29/95
Guerra, Deolis(R) RP OAK 65 6’5″ 245 lbs 4/17/89
Guerra, Javy(R) RP SD 8 6’0″ 185 lbs 9/25/95
Guerrero Jr., Vladimir 3B TOR 27 6’2″ 250 lbs 3/16/99
Guillorme, Luis 2B NYM 13 5’10” 190 lbs 9/27/94
Gurriel, Yuli 1B HOU 10 6’0″ 215 lbs 6/9/84
Gurriel Jr., Lourdes LF TOR 13 6’4″ 215 lbs 10/10/93
Gustave, Jandel(R) RP MIL 31 6’3″ 220 lbs 10/12/92
Gutierrez, Kelvin 3B BAL 82 6’2″ 215 lbs 8/28/94
Gutierrez, Vladimir(R) SP CIN 53 6’1″ 190 lbs 9/18/95

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