What If Xkcd Baseball

Relativistic Baseball

What would happen if you attempted to hit a baseball that was being thrown at 90 percent the velocity of light? – Ellen McManis, author Let’s put aside the topic of how we were able to get the baseball to move that quickly. For the sake of argument, let’s pretend it’s a typical pitch, except that the ball mysteriously speeds to 0.9c in the second the pitcher delivers it. From that moment on, everything progresses in accordance with the laws of physics. According to the batter, the answer is “a lot of things,” and they all happen extremely rapidly, with a negative outcome for the batter (or the pitcher).

My best attempt at a nanosecond-by-nanosecond portrait is given below as a guideline: Because the ball is moving so quickly, everything else appears to be standing still.

However, while air molecules oscillate back and forth at a few hundred miles per hour, the ball is flying through them at a speed of 600 million miles per hour.

The concepts of aerodynamics do not apply in this situation.

  • However, the air molecules in front of the ball do not have enough time to be jostled out of the way before the ball hits the ground.
  • Each collision results in a burst of gamma rays and dispersed particles being sent into space.
  • In the process, they break apart the molecules in the air, tearing the electrons from the nuclei, and transforming the atmosphere in the stadium into an expanding bubble of incandescent plasma.
  • When the ball is moving forward, the continual fusion at the front of the ball pulls back on it, slowing it down, as if the ball were a rocket traveling tail-first while firing its engines.
  • Although it does not penetrate the surface, it begins to eat away at the surface, spewing small pieces of the ball in all directions.
  • After around 70 nanoseconds, the ball has reached home plate.
  • Collisions with the surrounding air have nearly totally consumed the ball, which has transformed into a bullet-shaped cloud of expanding plasma (mostly composed of carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen) that is ramming into the surrounding air and sparking additional fusion as it goes.

When it reaches the batter, the cloud’s core is still travelling at a rate that is a significant fraction of the speed of light.

It takes only one microsecond for the x-ray and superheated plasma shell to engulf the backstop, both teams, the spectators, and the entire surrounding neighborhood to be swallowed up by the expanding shell.

The first thing you notice is a bright light that outshined the sun by a long shot.

Then, with a resounding boom, the blast wave approaches, taking down trees and destroying entire neighborhoods.

The baseball diamond has been reduced to a huge crater, which is situated a few hundred feet behind where the backstop used to stand.

According to a close reading of official Major League Baseball Rule 6.08(b), the hitter would be regarded to have been “hit by pitch” in this case, and would be able to advance to first base if the pitch was thrown in the right direction.

High Throw

Irish proverb: How far can a person toss something? Dave is a resident of the Isle of Man. Humans are excellent throwers of objects. No other animal can throw things as well as humans can; no other animal is as good as we are. Yes, chimps can hurl dung (and, on rare instances, stones), but they are not nearly as accurate or exact as humans. When Antlions toss sand at each other, they don’t aim it. Archerfish chase insects by hurling water droplets at them, but they do so using their mouths rather than their arms.

  • I’m not sure why they do this, but anytime I come across the line “blast jets of blood out their eyeballs” in an article, I just stop reading and gaze at it until I feel the urge to lie down.
  • As a matter of fact, we’ve gotten so adept at it that some academics believe rock-throwing played a crucial part in the formation of the modern human brain.
  • The release of the baseball by the pitcher at the precise appropriate position in the throw is required in order to deliver the baseball to a batter.
  • That is significant since it takes around five milliseconds for the quickest nerve impulse to reach the whole length of the arm.
  • It’s like a drummer dropping a drumstick from the 10th floor and striking a drum on the ground at the exact same time on the proper beat.
  • Due to the fact that we’re aiming for the greatest possible height, we may employ projectiles that curve upward when thrown forward; theAerobie OrbitersI used to have as a kid were notorious for getting caught in the highest treetops.
  • Of course, we could also attempt something like this: However, the deflector box appears to be less complicated.

I’ll give them to you in giraffes per unit of time: It’s likely that the typical individual can throw a baseball at least three giraffes in the air.

A baseball launched 14 giraffes high may theoretically be thrown by Aroldis Chapman, the holder of the world record for the fastest recorded fastball (105 mph).

It goes without saying that we can hurl projectiles considerably quicker than that with the use of instruments like as slings, crossbows, or the curvedxisterascoops in jai alai, among other things.

A baseball is definitely not the best projectile to use, but it’s difficult to locate statistics on the speed of other types of thrown items.

Bradstock’s knowledge and expertise provide us with a wealth of information (and a lot of other data, too).

There have only been a few instances of professional athletes tossing golf balls documented.

Despite the fact that this required a running start, there is reason to believe that a golf ball would be preferable over a baseball in this situation.

Although it is unlikely that utilizing a golf ball instead of a baseball would result in a significant speed improvement, it is possible that a professional pitcher with ample practice time might throw a golf ball faster than a baseball.

If you exclude the approach that any five-year-old can use to easily beat all of these records, the total is:

Hitting a comet

In their discussions with colleagues, astrophysicists frequently remark things like, “This mission to this comet is similar to tossing a baseball from New York City and hitting a certain window in San Francisco.” Are they actually on a par with one another? ‘Tom Foster’ is a euphemism for Thomas Foster. No, the baseball thing is far more difficult. To get something from New York to Los Angeles, you have to launch it into the atmosphere like an intercontinental ballistic missile. As I’m sure occurs from time to time, New York launched a campaign in Los Angeles.

  • Regardless of how rapidly they are traveling, they will eventually come to an abrupt halt before reaching outer space.
  • Probably, the comet-visiting spacecraft Tom’s astrophysicists are alluding to is the Rosetta mission, which is about to circle the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and launch a lander to the comet’s surface.
  • Rosetta is now on its way to Kevin, which is about 780 million kilometers away from the planet Earth.
  • Due to the fact that it is 780 million kilometers distant.
  • Consequently, Rosetta hitting its objective is like to tossing an item from New York and having it land on a specific key.
  • Although that is not a fair comparison, you have to agree that it sounds quite exact.
  • I was intrigued by this and asked about it.
  • Please let me know if you come across it!
  • Consider the case of remote surgery.
  • In order to achieve extremely high accuracy, both Rosetta and our laser surgeonI really hope that’s what this profession is calledwill tweak and fine-tune their motions as they make their final approaches.
  • So that gets me to something a bit different, with which I’d want to conclude this piece: a question for you to consider and perhaps respond.

Specifically, would you rather put a million dollars on the capacity of a spacecraft landing engineer to successfully conduct eye surgery, or on the ability of an eye surgeon to successfully land a probe on a comet? I haven’t been able to make up my mind.

Diamond

“What would happen if a meteor composed of diamonds with a diameter of 100 feet was moving at the speed of light and collided with the earth?” by Aidan Smith, age eight, through his father Jeff Nothing created of matter has the ability to travel at the speed of light. We can go near enough, though, so it’s all right. No matter how hard you push anything, it will never be able to reach the speed of light completely. This appears to be impossible to be correct, yet it is. Our cosmos is governed by certain strange laws.

  1. We’ll start off slow and gradually increase our speed.
  2. As it falls, it causes the air in front of it to get compressed.
  3. (This is the same process that causes spacecraft and meteors to heat up; real air friction has little to do with this.) By the time it reaches the ground, the bottom surface will have reached temperatures in excess of 500°C, which is hot enough to cause it to glow.
  4. It will reach us at around 11 kilometers per second if we place the diamond in space a short distance away from the Earth and then let it descend toward us at a slow rate.
  5. The short drop would be seen as a fireball if it happened at 11 kilometers per second.
  6. The resulting crater was around one-kilometer in diameter, somewhat smaller than Meteor Crater in Arizona, and it was created by a kilometer-wide impact.
  7. This is the speed at which the Leonid meteor shower arrives.
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A highly ingenious method was proposed by Isaac Newton for calculating how far bullets will penetrate their targets before coming to a stop.

However, it is expected to generate quite a stir.

This is when things start to get strange.

The fact that the air begins to undergo nuclear fusion at speeds in the hundreds of kilometers per second range adds a degree of unpredictability to this process (Google that paper title to find the full text).

However, it does nothing to benefit the earth.

A thousand times more energy is released than would be released by the greatest nuclear bomb, causing widespread devastation in the location where it lands.

0.99c: This is where the concept of relativity comes into play.

It’s simply a cluster of carbon atoms moving at such a high rate that Lorentz contraction flattens the entire structure into a pancake (although we wouldn’t be able to detect this with the unaided eye).

Each of the carbon atoms in the ball contains around 70 GeV of energy.

The air molecules smash three meters into the ball’s face before coming to a stop within it, and the ball lands to the ground with a significant amount of matter in it compared to when it left the ground.

When it comes into contact with the surface, it totally disintegrates, burrowing downward and outward, creating a cone-shaped route through the bedrock.

The energy tears a hole in the crust and bursts open a crater that is so large that you can see the molten mantle below it.

I’ve always believed that one of the most fascinating aspects of physics is that you can experiment with any number by adding extra digits to see what occurs, and no one can stop you.

If we go a bit quicker, we might be able to detect Higgs bosons in the hit debris.

It’s enough to punch a huge hole in the mantle and shake up the surface of the entire planet, turning it molten in the process.

Oops, the cat got his paws on my keyboard once more, and I ended up typing a bunch of 9s.

The Oh-My-God particle (which is not related to the God particle) may have been the fastest object (with mass) in recorded history.

The avalanche of particles it ripped apart surpassed anything the LHC was capable of churning forth.

Particles traveling at such speed collide with the Earth just a few of times every year.

Let’s give Aidan’s diamond meteor the speed of the Oh My God particle to make him look more impressive.

However, by seeing how cosmic rays cascade through rock, we may gain a general picture of what is going on.

As the energy ripples outward through the planet’s body, a cloud of expanding plasma and radiation gathers around the entrance point to form a protective shield.

The diamond meteor, as well as the cascade of particles it generated when it struck with the Earth’s crust, has been dispersed over our planet’s surface.

The Earth’s momentum would be sufficient to shift it into a new orbit—but the Earth does not exist anymore.

As it absorbs dust waves, the Sun hiccups and flares in response.

And in the far future, an alien scientist on a planet hundreds of light-years away from Earth frowns at a beeping detector and wonders what catastrophic event could have caused a particle to travel so quickly in the first place.

r/xkcd – What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?

According to a close reading of official Major League Baseball Rule 6.08(b), the hitter would be regarded to have been “hit by pitch” in this case, and would be able to advance to first base if the pitch was thrown in the right direction. Dwight Schrute has something to say: False! Let’s talk about it. When a batter is touched by a pitched ball that he is not attempting to hit, he becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without being subjected to the risk of being put out (provided he advances to and touches first base), as follows: (b) The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without being subjected to the risk of being put out (provided he advances to and touches first base).

  • A strike is declared if the ball enters the strike zone and makes contact with the batter, regardless of whether or not the batsman attempts to avoid contact with the ball.
  • RULING APPROVED BY THE JUDGE: When a hitter is struck by a thrown ball that does not provide him the right to advance to first base, the ball is considered dead and no runner is allowed to advance.
  • In this case, if we consider the ball to be the center of the debris field, Monroe asserts that the cloud’s core is still travelling at a rate that is a significant fraction of the speed of light.
  • That’s a foul ball, by the way.
  • Because it is both within and outside of the strike zone, 6.08(b) recommends that it should be labeled both a strike and a ball, and that the ball should be declared dead and that no runner should be permitted to advance after that.

What If? (book) – Wikipedia

The book by Randall Munroe is the subject of this article. See What If for more information on other novels.

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions

Author Randall Munroe
Country United States
Language English
Subject Sciencemiscellanea
Published September 2, 2014
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Media type Print
Pages 320 pages
ISBN 0-544-27299-4
Dewey Decimal 500
LC Class Q173.M965 2014
Website whatif.xkcd.com /book /

What If? : Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questionsis a non-fiction book written by Randall Munroe in which the author responds to hypothetical scientific questions submitted to him by followers of his webcomic, xkcd, in 2014. As well as numerous new questions and answers, the book includes a selection of questions and answers that were initially published on his blog What If? The book is organized into several dozen chapters, the most of which are devoted to discussing a single subject in some detail.

was published on September 2, 2014, and it has garnered overwhelmingly good reviews from reviewers.

2, was announced in January 2022, with a release date scheduled for September of that same year.

Conception of the blog

What If? : Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questionsis a non-fiction book written by Randall Munro in which the author responds to hypothetical scientific questions submitted to him by followers of his webcomic, xkcd, in 2014. As well as numerous new questions and answers, the book includes a selection of questions and answers that were previously published on his blog What If? The book is organized into several dozen chapters, the most of which are devoted to resolving a single issue or problem.

It was published on September 2, 2014, and it earned overwhelmingly good reviews from reviewers. An official sequel, titled What If? 2, was announced in January 2022, with a release date planned for September of that same calendar year.

Production

According to Munroe, in March of 2014, he had agreed to a contract with publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to combine a substantial number of his What If? posts into a book, which would be released in 2015. The book What If? : Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions would be published in September of that year, according to the publisher. As well as the questions and answers from the original blog, the What If?book includes nineteen brand-new questions and answers. In addition, Munroe chose a few unsolved queries from his email and organized them into discrete parts of the book for easy reference.

Instead, Munroe has included footnotes to the pieces in the book in order to enlighten or entertain the audience.

XKCD: Volume 0, a selected collection of xkcdcomics that was released in 2009, was Munroe’s first published book.

is his second published book.

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Content

What If? is mostly comprised of responses Munroe provides to hypothetical inquiries from readers on a variety of scientific issues. The questions are usually a little out of the ordinary, presuming an implausible scenario and enquiring as to the most logical conclusion to reach in the situation. “What if you tried to bat a baseball pitched at 90 percent the speed of light?” said Munroe in response to the first question posed on the site. In his analysis, Munroe used mathematics and physics to establish that the circumstance would result in a massive explosion, and that the outcome would be a ruling of hit by pitch.

In order to answer most problems, assumptions and cross-disciplinary science abilities are required, which leads to calculations done “on the back of the envelope.” What If?

Inbox,” which are brief compilations of questions Munroe had not addressed because he did not “want to think about it,” are also included in the book on a regular basis.

Reception

The novel garnered a great response from critics. In his article for the Boston Globe, Ethan Gilsdorf wrote that “it’s entertaining to watch as Munroe tackles each subject and investigates every conceivable complexity.” As described by Gilsdorf, What If?provides a glimpse into “Munroe’s fun yet existentially-tinged worldview” by comparing horrific possibilities with more cerebral thoughts, such as evaluating the implications of an earthquake with a magnitude of minus-7 on the Richter scale When it comes to Munroe’s work, the Huffington Post wrote, “What makes Munroe’s work so amazing is a mix of two elements: his devotion to trying to answer even the most bizarre topic with sound science, and his unmistakable sense of humor.” Rhett Allain of Wired complimented What If?

because it was entertaining enough that even his 12-year-old son could enjoy it, despite the fact that he discovered a tiny inaccuracy in one of the portions.

What If?

was published on September 2, 2014, and reached the top of the New York Timesbest-sellers list on September 21, 2014, as well as being named the “AmazonBest Book of the Month” on September 22, 2014. In 2014, the book was nominated for a Goodreads Choice Award in the category of “Best Nonfiction.”

Notes

  1. It earned a favorable reception from the press. “It’s entertaining to watch as Munroe addresses each subject and investigates every conceivable complexity,” wrote Ethan Gilsdorf of the Boston Globe. According to Gilsdorf, What If? provides a glimpse into “Munroe’s fun yet existentially-tinged worldview” by comparing apocalyptic possibilities with more cerebral thoughts, such as investigating the implications of an earthquake with a magnitude of minus-7 on the Richter scale. In the words of TheHuffington Post, “What makes Munroe’s work so amazing is a mix of two elements: his devotion, which is to attempt to answer even the most bizarre topic with good science, and his obvious sense of humor.” Despite finding a tiny inaccuracy in one of the sections, Rhett Allain of Wired applauded What If? for the fact that even his 12-year-old son enjoyed it. A delta was printed where a square box was meant to be printed, according to Sam Hewitt of Varsity and Marla Desat of The Escapist, indicating that the first print run had problems comprehending mathematical symbols. Upon its release on September 2, 2014, What If? rocketed to the number one spot on the New York Timesbest-sellers list on September 21, while also being named the “Amazon Best Book of the Month.” It was also a finalist for the 2014 Goodreads Choice Awards for “Best Nonfiction.”

References

  1. “What if I wrote a book?” wonders Munroe Randall on the 12th of March, 2014. blog.xkcd.com. The original version of this article was published on April 6, 2016. “What If There Was An Entire Book Devoted To Absurd Hypotheses?” you may wonder. National Public Radio (NPR) and its employees 2014-09-07. On April 6, 2016, the original version of this article was archived. Randall Munroe’s article “Lightning” appeared in What If?: serious scientific solutions to silly hypothetical problems in 2014. (hardback). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, New York, pp.89–94, ISBN 978-0-544-45686-0
  2. Randall Munroe’s article “Orbital Speed” was published in What If?: serious scientific responses to ludicrous hypothetical issues in 2014. (hardback). ISBN 978-0-544-45686-0
  3. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, New York, pp.187–191. Randall Munroe’s “Short-Answer Section” was included in What if? : serious scientific responses to ludicrous hypothetical problems in 2014. (hardback). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, New York, pp.83–88, ISBN 978-0-544-45686-0
  4. In “What if? 2: Additional Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions”, a website called xkcd.com, a series of absurd hypothetical questions are answered. abChang, Kenneth (2022-02-05)
  5. Retrieved2022-02-05
  6. (2014-11-03). “He’s Glad You Asked,” he says, smiling. The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City. Archived from the original on 2014-11-08
  7. AbGarber, Megan (2012-09-26). “A Conversation With Randall Munroe, the Creator of XKCD”. Archived from the original on 2014-11-08. The Atlantic Ocean. A version of this article appeared in print on April 6, 2016
  8. AbcBallard, Ed (2014-03-20). In this article, we will discuss “Seven Lessons From the XKCD “What If” Comic Strip.” As reported by the Wall Street Journal. The original version of this article was published on April 6, 2016
  9. AbDesat, Marla (2014-09-09). “What If? Answers All Your (Literally) Burning Questions” is a review of the book What If? The Escapist is a magazine dedicated to escape. The original version of this article was published on June 6, 2016
  10. AbHewitt, Sam (2014-10-24). “What If?” is the title of the book. Varsity. The original version of this article was published on 2016-06-06
  11. Milian, Mark (2009-11-04). According to the author, “‘XKCD: Volume 0’ is sticking it to established publishers.” The Los Angeles Times is a newspaper based in California. Shankland, Stephen (2015-09-14) Archived from the original on 15 September 2015. (2015-12-01). Gleick, Peter (2016-06-06). “‘Thing Explainer’: Fun if you love puzzles, irritating if you just want to learn.” CNET. Archived from the original on 2016-06-06. (2014-08-31). Huffington Post published an article titled “‘What If? – A Review of Randall Munroe’s New Book”. The original version of this article was published on April 6, 2016
  12. AbGilsdorf, Ethan (2014-09-08). “Randall Munroe’s ‘What If? : Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions’ is a must-read.” The Boston Globe. On April 6, 2016, the original version of this article was archived (2014-12-19). “What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions” is a book review published in the journal Science. Wired. On April 6, 2016, the original version of “Best Sellers” was archived. The New York Times published an article on September 21st, 2014. On April 6, 2016, the original version of this article was archived. Randall Munroe is the author of this work (2014). How Would You Feel If.? : Serious Scientific Responses to Absurd Hypothetical Questions ISBN 978-0544272996
  13. Named one of the “Best Nonfiction Books of 2014.” Goodreads. On April 6, 2016, the original version of this article was archived.

Xkcd at TED Delivers a Heckuva Fastball

Randall, get out of here! Photograph taken from a TED video by TED What would you do if someone threw a baseball at you at a speed of 970 million kilometres per second? Things that are bad. Things that are really awful. However, one positive outcome of the situation is a fantastic and entertaining TED presentation by my buddy Randall Munroe, author of the xkcd and what if?comics. There is also a transcript available. Randall is a pleasure to be around. Curiosity is one of his most endearing and uniquely human attributes, and he possesses a lot of it.

What-if.xkcd

Every day, I receive a large number of bizarre hypothetical science inquiries in my inbox. For whatever reason, people get into heated conversations with their pals about topics such as “what would happen if someone hurled a baseball at almost the speed of light?” or “how many velociraptors would it take to kill a human?” and then decide to send me an email about their findings. It’s a lot of fun to puzzle over these questions, which is why I’ve chosen to start a blog to collect and attempt to answer as many as I can.

Every Tuesday, I’ll provide a new question and accompanying response.

As a result, your favorite webcomic opens a new chapter in which it explores the mental pimples that we all suffer from on a daily basis, illustrating them with method and Randall’s illustrations that you find so appealing and amusing.

In sum, every Thursday is a complete and total nerdout.

What If? (International Edition): Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions: Munroe, Randall: 9780544456860: Amazon.com: Books

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Gift for the Geek in Your Life On June 27, 2020, the United States will conduct a review. It was purchased as a birthday present for my nerdy chic male bestie. The book is far larger than anticipated. For some reason, I had the notion it would be the same size as my ipad mini, however I’m not sure why I had that impression lol. The book is in excellent shape. I’m hoping he enjoys it.

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Top reviews from the United States

verified purchaseReviewed in the United States on October 8, 2017Verified Purchase The best restroom book I’ve ever read. and I mean that in the most positive sense that you could possibly conceive. It’s impossible to go better than this if you want your party attendees to return to intellectual discussion as fast as possible after visiting the restroom while still supplying them with appropriate reading material. Concise chapters with excellent visuals, and engaging themes. The number of hours of study that went into this book is beyond me to contemplate, but it is truly incredible, and I have given numerous copies to friends over the years.

  1. Thank you very much, Randall Munroe!
  2. Some of the what if possibilities have been amusing to our family, and we have laughed over them.
  3. Their favorite objects include the world’s fastest man-made object and a swimming pool created from a nuclear reactor.
  4. Purchased in the United States on February 18, 2017 and reviewed on February 19, 2017Verified Purchase For those of you who appreciate Randall Munroe’s webcomic XKCD.com, you’ll enjoy this entertaining selection from his blog- What if?
  5. and Alternatively, could you create a periodic table using real chunks of each element?
  6. Munroe utilizes his wide knowledge to each issue, resulting in surprising and amusing outcomes for everyone.
  7. I bought both because I’ve been a fan of XKCD for many years and wanted to show my support for his work.

On March 17, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States.

On the opening page of the book, I heard a 17-year-old lad exclaim with excitement and laughter as he flipped the pages for the first time.

“This is AWESOME!” he exclaimed, and he immediately began reading portions from the book out loud to me.

The majority of my abilities are literary in nature.

This specific book, in particular, may be presented to a plethora of different people!

It would also be useful to have on the bedside table in the guest room in case of a visitor who is getting restless.

On December 9, 2016, a reviewer in the United States confirmed that they had made a purchase.

Unfortunately, some of them seem baffled as to why on earth I would want to study what they consider to be a pointless physics textbook that provides no relevant information.

Occasionally, even the most ludicrous questions have certain solutions, such as what would happen to the hitter if the pitcher delivered a ball at a speed approaching that of light.

In a similar vein to Mythbusters, they investigate what would have to occur in order to achieve the desired effect.

There isn’t anything noticeable.

something significantly more intriguing This book is a lot of fun, and it makes a terrific coffee-table book as well.

On January 14, 2022, a review will be conducted in the United States.

“How do buffalos fly with those little wings?” was one of my favorite questions from high school.

Having said that, there is a significant distinction between a foolish question and an outrageous question.

An ridiculous question necessitates the use of one’s imagination (although a twisted one at times), and attempting to answer it may be a beneficial exercise, even if the end result is ultimately worthless.

Each QA section is adorned with adorably primitive stick figure illustrations, as well as some amazing charts and graphs (as well as some amusing footnotes) when they’re essential to further explain a certain point.

An other question concerned what would happen if a pitcher threw a baseball at nine-tenths the speed of light (spoiler alert:pitcher, batter, and most of the people in the stadium would be vaporized in a plasmatic cloud).

Among the semi-serious ludicrous inquiries are the disturbing ones, which make you doubt the sanity of many of the individuals who seek Munroe’s help on a regular basis.

Overall, it’s an entertaining book to read if you have a curious mind but don’t want to bother your friends who are more knowledgeable in physics with every small question that comes to mind.

On December 10, 2015, it was reviewed in the United States, and it was verified as a purchase.

It came up while I was looking for books for my kid, books that dealt with subjects such as anatomy and geography, as well as other “intellectual” things (vs.

It’s far too sophisticated for my kid, but my spouse will like it and may be able to clarify the concepts for my son to understand. The book itself is quite intriguing, however it may be a little too much for individuals who are not particularly mathematically minded.

Top reviews from other countries

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Anyone with a curious mind and an interest in science will find this book to be a complete delight. On December 27, 2017, a review was conducted in the United Kingdom. Purchase that has been verified This book is fantastic! It is both outrageously humorous, thought-provoking, and instructive, and it provides you with a plethora of “did you know” anecdotes that will keep your friends and family entertained for months! It’s a completely self-contained novel. All disciplines of science are covered in the small chapters (3-6 pages), which are very much at random.

  1. What is the age range?
  2. 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Interesting, amusing, and mind-expanding!
  3. Purchase that has been verified This book, which is subtitled ‘Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions,’ is both fun and educational at the same time.
  4. He also advises that he is less concerned with health and safety than he is with investigating how objects behave when blown up, etc.
  5. One or two of the questions addressed are ones that are often asked of scientists and others, but Randall Munroe adds a fascinating twist to his responses to these concerns.

‘What would happen if you built the Periodic Table out of cube-shaped bricks, with each brick consisting of the corresponding element?’, if we assumed there is life on the nearest habitable exoplanet and that they have technology comparable to ours.’ ‘What would people see if they glanced at our star right now?’, and ‘How many different English tweets are there that could be sent?’ Can you tell me how long it would take the whole world’s population to read them out loud?’ The easiest way to describe the material is eclectic, which is probably the greatest description.

  1. Laughable, well thought out, and likely controversial in some circles, this film is both instructive and amusing.
  2. It was really entertaining, instructive, and humorous.
  3. On July 2, 2017, a review was published in the United Kingdom.
  4. I was a little concerned that this book might be too juvenile or too simplistic for him because he has always shown an interest in the sciences and studied mathematics at university level.
  5. Despite the fact that it covers enough complicated material to keep him engaged, it is also filled with lots of brilliantly funny moments that make it a truly engaging read.
  6. 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product The perfect solution for over-talkative, creative children!
  7. While this does not provide solutions to those particular issues, it does pose comparable out-of-the-box inquiries and provides scientifically sound responses in an age-appropriate manner.

This book comes highly recommended for your inquisitive child.

Please take the time to read it.

Book of Genius.

You don’t need any kind of degree to read this book; all of the principles are discussed in a very simple manner, sometimes via the use of analogies or metaphors, which makes the book highly accessible.

And, certainly, they are based on legitimate scientific principles.

Not only do you learn some science, but you also discover some other interesting things along the way, which makes it a very fascinating experience. This is a book that I strongly suggest to everyone who enjoys deliberation and contemplation. I wish there had been more of it.

xkcd asks, “what if.?”

If you are a regular reader of this site, you are undoubtedly already familiar with xkcd, the web comic created by the geektastic Randall Munroe. What you may not be aware of is that Randall is an exceptionally bright individual who has a strong interest in physics and mathematics. The larger picture is something he enjoys thinking about, and he enjoys taking what may appear to be ridiculous ideas and running with them to see where they go. As a result, I’m overjoyed to discover that he’s launched a blog called “what if?” He accepts bizarre questions from readers and responds to them, following the logic wherever it may lead him to do so.

That was the question posed in the first post.

Huh.

Huh.

After you’ve finished reading it, you’ll feel smarter – you’ll be smarter.

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