How To Play College Baseball

You Want to Play College Baseball?

Finding a spot to play collegiate baseball sometimes appear to be an insurmountable challenge. Fortunately, this does not have to be the case. KPB is here to assist you in developing a strategy for being recruited and playing collegiate baseball. Everyone’s quest to play collegiate baseball takes them down a different road. Keep Playing Baseball was established to assist you in locating yours. Everything begins with a plan, and you’ve arrived at the ideal location to develop yours! When we speak with high school recruits about the possibility of playing college baseball, we ask them three questions:

  1. If you wish to play collegiate baseball, please raise your hand. Continue your efforts if you are aware of what has to be done in order to be recruited to play collegiate baseball. Maintain your efforts if you have a unique strategy for how you want to be recruited to play college baseball
  2. Else, stop.

In response to question 1, we observe as almost every hand goes up for question 2, and then nearly every hand drops down for question 3. If you find yourself in a similar scenario, we can assist you in understanding what it takes to get recruited as well as developing a customized strategy for giving yourself the greatest chance to play at the next level of competition. When it comes to playing in college, many high school ballplayers make the error of believing that they have no chance if they aren’t approached by college coaches or don’t have the financial means to attend costly showcases or join expensive travel ball teams.

There are a number of things you can do to improve your chances of playing at a higher level, even if there are no guarantees.

We provide the information, you put in the work!

You can still be recruited and play college baseball even if you have no money to spend on the recruiting process. If you are ready to work hard and put in the time, we believe you can get recruited and play college baseball. Our team at KPB has developed a mechanism for gathering and disseminating information from people who are most knowledgeable about college baseball and recruiting–college coaches and players! We organize this material into written pieces, podcast episodes, educational videos, and other resources, all of which are intended to assist you with the ten-step college search and recruitment process shown below.

  1. You will learn about collegiate baseball, as well as the recruitment process for college baseball players. Design and implement a customized recruitment strategy
  2. (With college coaches) Prepare yourself for contact and exposure. Make contact with coaches and ask for exposure. Communication with prospective college coaches on an ongoing basis
  3. Preparing for campus tours and visiting other educational institutions
  4. Comparing and contrasting offerings and alternatives Making a commitment
  5. Managing post-commitment obligations
  6. And arriving prepared are all important.

The recruitment process may be broken down into more manageable chunks, and action steps can be developed to provide a road map to college baseball that tells you what to do, when to do it, and how to do it the correct way!

Important Facts

Baseball players from all over the country get to enjoy the fun, excitement, difficulties, and camaraderie that come with playing on a collegiate baseball team every year. Currently and previous players have generously shared their knowledge and guidance with us so that you might have a chance to experience the same possibilities that they did. “When you play collegiate baseball, you are placed on a team with 40 diverse individuals with whom you must form a cohesive unit. You become, in essence, 40 brothers as a member of the team, and you may maintain a relationship with each of them for the rest of your life.

If you ever need anything or need someone to talk to, you can always count on those 40 guys with whom you’ve formed a relationship.” — Louisiana Junior College Pitcher

You don’t have to be a stud to play college baseball.

However, while the top players on major league teams are highly sought by college and professional clubs, they are not the only ones that have the ability to play at the next level. There are over 1,600 different collegiate baseball programs available to students who are ready to put in the effort both on and off the field. These programs are spread over more than six different levels. The majority of the athletes who have shared their stories here were not recruited or approached by professional scouts early in their careers, yet they were nevertheless able to realize their ambitions.

You need to know about the NCAA and other governing bodies.

Any college sport requires you to be familiar with the National Collegiate Athletic Organization (NCAA), the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA), or your local community college association in order to be successful. These organizations govern who is eligible to participate and what regulations athletes must adhere to while still in school. You may find them on the web at and. Colleges publish a list of the organizations with whom they collaborate on their team or sports department web pages.

Never take a chance on guessing what you need to accomplish in order to be qualified to participate.

It’s best to start planning early.

To be a collegiate athlete, you must adhere to the NCAA or NAIA standards in order to be considered “eligible” to compete. This implies that you must enroll in particular, authorized courses and examinations while still in high school in order to be eligible. Colleges have different requirements for classes and grades, so you should start preparing early to ensure that you don’t make mistakes in picking classes that may limit your options later on in your college career. Considering how competitive college baseball is, you’ll be more likely to play if you have the grades and talents that will allow you to be considered for more than one or two colleges.

Athletic scholarships aren’t the only way to pay.

While you and your parents may hope that you will be awarded a baseball scholarship, the reality is that there aren’t many available. Baseball, in contrast to head-count scholarship sports like as football, which provide all scholarship players with a “full-ride,” employs an equivalency scholarship scheme to compensate for the lack of head-count scholarship players. This implies that the majority of athletes who are fortunate enough to receive a scholarship will likely only have a portion of their college expenses covered.

The fact that you are unable to obtain a “full ride” does not mean that you should give up on your ambition. We’ll assist you in learning about other methods of paying for education. More information on paying for education may be found here.

How This Website Can Help You
  • Gain access to frank and accurate player-to-player information about all facet of the recruiting process, from academics to school visits
  • We are not in the business of selling anything to you. Throughout the book, you’ll discover straightforward discussion without the usual sales pitch. Year-by-year pages, checklists, and a 10-step recruitment road map have been created to assist you in staying on track with your efforts. We’ve provided useful resources to assist you in improving your abilities and understanding of the game
  • For example, Players that have “been there” are on hand to provide assistance. Continue to participate in baseball.

For additional information on how to use this website to your advantage in order to make it to college baseball, please visit this page.

You Want to Play College Baseball?

When college coaches do not approach high school ballplayers during their sophomore year, many believe that they have little chance of playing in college. This is a common misconception among high school players. This simply isn’t accurate in any way. There are a number of things you can do to improve your chances of playing at a higher level, even if there are no guarantees. That is what this website is all about: assisting you in obtaining the information you want from college baseball players while you are searching for a location to play.

  1. List the colleges that are most appropriate for you based on your talents, interests, and career aspirations
  2. Investigate what steps you must do to be eligible to play for the colleges on your list. Find creative methods to communicate with the coaches about your want to participate and to help them get to know you. Complete all of the prerequisites to participate and submit your applications

Baseball players from all over the country get to enjoy the fun, excitement, difficulties, and camaraderie that come with playing on a collegiate baseball team every year. Currently and previous players have generously shared their knowledge and guidance with us so that you might have a chance to experience the same possibilities that they did. “When you play collegiate baseball, you are placed on a team with 40 diverse individuals with whom you must form a cohesive unit. You become, in essence, 40 brothers as a member of the team, and you may maintain a relationship with each of them for the rest of your life.

  1. There are several opportunities for athletes who are prepared to put in the effort on and off the field to compete at the collegiate level.
  2. By going here, you may learn more about whether or not you have what it takes to compete at the next level.
  3. These organizations govern who is eligible to participate and what regulations athletes must adhere to while still in school.
  4. Colleges publish a list of the organizations with whom they collaborate on their team or sports department web pages.
  5. Never take a chance on guessing what you need to accomplish in order to be qualified to participate.
  6. This implies that you must enroll in particular, authorized courses and examinations while still in high school in order to be eligible.
  7. Considering how competitive college baseball is, you’ll be more likely to play if you have the grades and talents that will allow you to be considered for more than one or two colleges.
  8. While you and your parents may hope that you will be awarded a baseball scholarship, the reality is that there aren’t many available.

The fact that you are unable to obtain a “full ride” does not mean that you should give up on your ambition. We’ll assist you in learning about other methods of paying for education. More information on paying for education may be found here.

  • The most often asked questions by high school players regarding playing at the next level are answered by experienced college players. We are not in the business of selling anything to you. Throughout the book, you’ll discover straightforward discussion without the usual sales pitch. You can keep on track by organizing your tasks and completing them year after year using our year-by-year checklists. We’ve provided useful resources to assist you in improving your abilities and understanding of the game
  • For example, Players that have “been there” are on hand to provide assistance. Continue to participate in baseball.

College Baseball Recruiting Guidelines

“Do I have what it takes to play collegiate baseball?” “How excellent do you have to be?” says the narrator. These are the two most often asked questions among student-athletes. Only a small percentage of high school baseball players go on to play Division 1 college baseball, but there are more options in the lower divisions. When it comes to height, weight, and talent, understanding what college baseball scouts are looking for in position players may assist student-athletes in narrowing down their college search to institutions that offer the level of competition that is the greatest match for them.

How to use the baseball recruiting guidelines

The arm strength, fielding range, speed, and hitting power and average are all factors considered by college baseball scouts when evaluating prospects. When it comes to recruiting rules, student-athletes can use them as a suitable benchmark to compare themselves to athletes participating at the collegiate level. What characteristics do college baseball scouts look for at each position in general? What skill sets should be had by specific position players? To provide recruits and their families with a clearer idea of what would be required of them at each post, this section breaks down divisional recruitment criteria into subsections.

  • Recruiting guidelines are simply that: recommendations. These are an indication of what coaches generally look for, but there will be exceptions. Coaches are looking for the best fits for their team
  • Travel ball experience is a key source for coaches to find recruits, especially at the Division 1 level
  • Getting evaluated by a trusted third-party or a current coach will provide an objective assessment of how a recruit measures up against scholarship-level athletes in relation to these guidelines. Recruits and parents can call our team at 866-495-5172 to gauge and improve their status in the recruiting process

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What do college baseball coaches look for in recruits?

In their evaluations of prospective players, college coaches are continually trying to forecast how well they will do at the collegiate level. The most common concern that recruits or their parents have is that, while a recruit may be extremely talented at the high school level, if they are not competing against college level competition, they are of little use to a college coach. At the collegiate level, the game is played significantly more quickly. Recruits must demonstrate the necessary strength, speed, and overall athleticism in order to make the transition.

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Coaches are paying attention to how a prospect conducts themselves prior to the game, during the game, and after the game, among other things.

All else being equal, a prospect who has the will to work hard will be recruited above a potential who possesses the talent but lacks the necessary work ethic to succeed.

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What age do scouts look at baseball players?

Coaches will begin evaluating prospects as soon as they have reached a level of physical development that allows them to make a fair prediction of how they will perform as an 18- to 21-year-old athlete in the future. What makes this challenging for many recruits is that certain coaches are willing to project sooner than others, and athletes develop at varying rates depending on their developmental stage. Prospects hoping to be recruited have little influence over how quickly they grow or what coaches think of them once they are recruited.

Find out more about AAU baseball teams and competitions by visiting their website. Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Experience with a travel baseball club: 3–4 years of high-level travel baseball
  • Awards and distinctions include: several All-Conference, All-Area, and All-State selections
  • All-American awards
  • And All-American honors. Years as a varsity starter: 3–4 seasons

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Experience with a trip baseball club: 2–3 years of high-level travel baseball
  • Awards and honors have been bestowed on me several times. All-Conference, All-Area, and maybe All-State recognition
  • Years as a varsity starter: 2–3 seasons

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Experience with a club: 2–3 years of travel baseball experience
  • Awards and honors have been bestowed on me several times. All-Conference and All-Area recognition
  • 1–2 seasons as a starter with the varsity team

Junior College (also known as junior college) is a type of college that is open to students in grades 9 through 12.

  • Experience with a club: 2–3 years of travel baseball experience
  • Awards and honors have been bestowed on me several times. All-Conference and All-Area recognition
  • 1–2 seasons as a starter with the varsity team

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What do college baseball scouts look for in a pitcher?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Pitch velocity: 84 MPH consistently
  • Up to 95+ MPH when necessary
  • Command of at least three pitches
  • ERA: less than 2.00
  • A minimum of one strikeout every inning pitched
  • Fewer than one hitter is walked every two innings pitched

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Speed of one off-speed pitch and one additional pitch thrown to places consistently
  • Pitch velocity: 82 MPH to 90 MPH or more
  • Control of one off-speed pitch and one other pitch thrown to spots consistently
  • ERA: less than 3.00
  • Approximately 1 K for every 1 inning pitched
  • 1 batter is walked around for every 2 innings pitched by the pitcher.

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Control of at least one off-speed pitch while developing another is required. Pitch velocity ranges from 77 to 82 miles per hour. The ratio of strikeouts to walks is one to one
  • The ERA is 2.50–3.50.

Junior College (also known as junior college) is a type of college that is open to students in grades 9 through 12.

  • 80 MPH constant pitch velocity
  • 1 or fewer than 1 K per inning pitched
  • 80 MPH consistent strikeout rate
  • ERA is less than 4.00

A D1 baseball pitcher’s physical appearance is as follows: Nelson Gord, a former D1 baseball player and current NJCAA coach, explains down the characteristics that D1 college coaches look for in both right-handed and left-handed pitchers. Return to the top of the page

What do college baseball scouts look for in a catcher?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Body measurements: 6’1″
  • Weight range, 185–200 lbs. Coaches will pay special attention to catch and throw technique, as well as arm strength demonstrated when throwing to second and third base. When recruiting catchers, Division 1 coaches will seek for players that have exceptional leadership abilities and the ability to collaborate with their whole pitching staff. Division 1 catchers have strong bat swings and can hit for power or average at a high level in most situations. Slugging percentage:.600 (minimum of two at bats each game)
  • On-base percentage:.500 1.95 and lower consistently (as verified by an impartial source)
  • An ERA of less than 2.00
  • A pop time of 1.95 and below consistently

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Height: 6’0″
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • On-base percentage:.450
  • Slugging percentage:.550 (minimum of two at-bats each game)
  • When it comes to pop time, it should be 2.0 or lower on a consistent basis (as validated by an impartial source)

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • OBP:.400
  • Slugging:.500
  • Pop time: 2.0 – 2.1
  • Height: 5’11”

Junior college is a type of college that is designed for students who are in their first year of college.

  • The following statistics apply: height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs
  • OBP:.350
  • Slugging:.450
  • Pop Time: 2.1 or less

What is the most effective method for high school catchers to sell themselves to Division I college coaches? Check out the video below for some advice from Nelson Gord, a former D1 baseball player who is now an NJCAA coach. Return to the top of the page

What do college baseball scouts look for in a first baseman?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • When I was a junior and senior in high school, my height ranged from 6’2″ to 6’6″ and my weight ranged from 190 to 240 pounds. Slugging percentage:.750 (minimum of two at bats each game)
  • On-base percentage:.500

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Height: at least 6’0″ is required. A minimum of 180 pounds in weight is required. It is necessary to exhibit the capacity or capability to strike with force. As a junior and senior in high school, a strong 1B recruit in this tier should have a couple home runs and a significant number of RBIs.

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Height: 6’0″
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • Power numbers: three home runs and twenty-five RBIs

Junior College (also known as junior college) is a type of college that is open to students in grades 9 through 12.

  • The player is 5’11” and weighs 170 lbs. His power numbers are 2+ home runs and 20+ RBI.

When it comes to recruiting first basemen, what characteristics do Division I college coaches look for? In the video below, Nelson Gord, a former Division I baseball player who is now an NJCAA coach, discusses how athletes might capture the attention of college coaches. Return to the top of the page

What do college baseball scouts look for in a third baseman?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Height: 5’10″–6’3″
  • Weight: 180–220 lbs
  • Infield velocity: 85–95 MPH
  • HR: 5–10 as a junior and senior in high school
  • OBP:.500
  • Slugging:.750
  • Batting average:.500
  • Slugging percentage:.750

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Height ranges from 5’9″ to 6’3″
  • Weight ranges from 170 to 220 pounds. With the possibility to increase via growth, the infield velocity should be at least 80 miles per hour. As a high school junior and senior, you must have at least 2 HR
  • Your OBP and SLG must be at least.400 in each category.

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • The player is 6’0″ and weighs 180 lbs. His power numbers are two or more home runs and twenty-five or more RBI.

Junior college is a type of college that is designed for students who are in their first year of college.

  • The player is 5’11” and weighs 170 lbs. His power numbers are 2+ home runs and 20+ RBI.

Is there anything else that D1 college coaches look for in a potential third base prospect other measurables? Check out the video below to hear Nelson Gord, a former D1 baseball player who is now an NJCAA coach, give his third basemen recruitment recommendations. Return to the top of the page

What do college baseball scouts look for in a middle infielder?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Height: 5’8″–6’2″
  • Weight: 165–190 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: 6.5–6.8 seconds (as validated by a third party)
  • Height: 5’8″–6’2″
  • Weight: 165–190 lbs Infield velocity: Division 1 middle infield recruits will throw the ball across the diamond at speeds ranging from 85 to 95 miles per hour
  • OBP:.500
  • Slugging:.600 (minimum of two at bats per game)
  • Slugging:. The classic Division I middle infield recruit can hit for a high average, steal a lot of bases, and occasionally hit for power
  • However, this is not always the case.

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • 5’8″–6’2″ in height, 165–190 pounds in weight, with a time of 6.9 seconds in the 60-yard sprint or less. The speed of the ball on the infield is in the low 80s and above MPH from the shortstop. (minimum of two at bats each game)
  • OBP:.550
  • Slugging:.450
  • Batting average:.550

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Dimensions: 5’11”
  • Weight: 170 lbs
  • 60-yard sprint time: 7.0 or below
  • Infield velocity: 78+ MPH from SS
  • On-base percentage (OBP):.400
  • Slugging percentage (SLG):.500

Junior college is a type of college that is designed for students who are in their first year of college.

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 165 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: 7.1 seconds or less
  • Infield velocity: upper 70s MPH from second base
  • On-base percentage:.350
  • Slugging percentage:.450

College coaches at the D1 level tend to concentrate their recruiting efforts on shortstops rather than players who are primarily second basemen when it comes to midfielders.

Take a look at the video below to get advice on how to be recruited from former D1 baseball player and current NJCAA baseball coach Nelson Gord. Return to the top of the page

What do college baseball scouts look for in a center fielder?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Height ranges from 5’9″ to 6’2″
  • Weight ranges from 175 to 210 pounds. From the outfield, the infield is traveling at speeds of 87–95 MPH. 60-yard dash: less than 6.7 seconds
  • From the outfield, the infield is traveling at speeds of 87–95 MPH. Slugging percentage:.600 (minimum of two at bats each game)
  • On-base percentage:.500

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: less than 6.9 seconds
  • OBP:.450
  • SLG:.500 (minimum of two at bats per game)

Division 3 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: 6.9 seconds or less
  • OF velocity: 80+ miles per hour
  • OBP:.400
  • Slugging:.500

Junior college is a type of college that is designed for students who are in their first year of college.

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: 7.0 or less
  • OF velocity: 78+ MPH
  • OBP:.350
  • Slugging:.450

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What do college baseball scouts look for in a corner outfielder?

Division 1 is the most competitive division in the league.

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: less than 6.8 seconds
  • Out-of-bounds velocity: more than 87 miles per hour (as confirmed by an impartial source)
  • Slugging percentages of at least 5 home runs as a high school junior and senior
  • .750 (minimum of 2 at bats each game)
  • On-base percentage of at least.500

Division 2 is the second division in the United States.

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • 60-yard sprint time: less than 7.0 seconds The OF’s velocity is in the low 80s at the very least, with the ability to improve
  • Slugging: I hit many home runs as a junior and senior in high school.

Division 3/National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: 6.9 or less
  • OF velocity: 80+ MPH
  • OB percent:.400
  • Slugging percentage:.650

Junior college is a type of college that is designed for students who are in their first year of college.

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs
  • 60-yard dash: 7.0 or less
  • Out-of-bounds velocity: 78+ MPH

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How to Get Recruited for College Baseball

The process of recruiting for collegiate baseball is exactly that: a process. There are no quick cuts in this process. While understanding of each phase in the process is important, student-athletes will be better equipped to negotiate its twists and turns and comprehend exactly how difficult it is to be recruited for baseball the more they learn about it. Indeed, high school baseball involves more than 500,000 student-athletes, with less than two percent of those players going on to play collegiate baseball at the Division 1 level.

In Division 1, each school can only get up to 11.7 scholarships, but in Division 2, each institution can only receive a maximum of nine scholarships, according to NCAA regulations.

Students-athletes should review this step-by-step baseball recruiting guide to understand the standards and milestones they should achieve throughout the recruiting process.

However, the information and insider recommendations provided by the National Collegiate Sports Association (NCSA) will encourage student-athletes to be proactive in the process and take control of their recruiting experience.

College baseball recruiting tips

Here are some basic college baseball recruiting suggestions that will assist keep the process moving along until we get into the specifics of how to get recruited for baseball:

  • Above all, get started as soon as possible. Recruitment for baseball is extremely competitive, and every day that an athlete does not do something to enhance their recruiting process, it is reasonable to presume that another recruit is doing exactly the same thing
  • Conduct thorough research. You’ll discover how to develop a list of target schools that will be the greatest fit for you in the sections that follow. Remember, while selecting a college, don’t limit your considerations to baseball. In addition, consider if the school is a suitable match intellectually, socially, culturally, and athletically for you for the next four years, and whether you will be happy there for the next four years. Take the initiative: Throughout this course, we highlight the importance of not waiting for coaches to come to you. It is your responsibility to contact them and follow up on any discussions or connections you have with them.
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College baseball recruiting timeline

  • Every week, visit two to three schools for research. List 100 possible colleges and universities that are strong athletic and intellectual fits for you. Make a video of your abilities
  • Introducing coaches using letters or emails is a good idea
  • Make at least three unofficial visits to colleges and universities
  • Select two to three camps, as well as one or two showcases, to attend when the school season concludes. Keep up the good work! Make phone calls, write letters, and send emails to establish and maintain contacts.

Tips to keep in mind:

  • Once a coach has discovered a possible recruit, he or she will track the player’s progress throughout high school, in camps, in the classroom, and on the field. Recruits’ character is taken into consideration in addition to their baseball abilities
  • How they conduct themselves on the field and with their teammates and coach. A letter, email, or phone call to a coach is never too early to initiate communication. Coaches can be contacted at any time by student-athletes, although Division 1 and Division 2 coaches will not be able to personally answer until their junior year. Division 3 and NAIA coaches are not restricted in their ability to contact student-athletes at specific times. Do not submit an application to a school where you will not be a strong athletic or academic fit. This is where target school research may be quite beneficial.

Sophomore year

  • Student-athletes should shoot or update their skills tapes and have them reviewed by a third-party before participating in competition. Research potential schools and restrict the list of institutions to be considered for enrollment. Continue to develop connections with coaches from programs that have been recognized as being a suitable fit by making phone calls, writing letters, and sending emails. Completing surveys is required. Travel on an unofficial basis

Junior year

  • It is necessary to update the skills video and get it reevaluated
  • Coaches should be followed up with as soon as possible. Respond to each and every coach. Inquire with coaches about your position on their list of prospects. Complete the questions in the meanwhile. Continue to make unofficial visits to schools
  • And Reduce the number of schools on your list that you are interested in

Tips to keep in mind:

  • Schools in Division 1 and Division 2 can begin to make scholarship offers to students. Coaches should be contacted on an individual basis at least once each week. If a coach has not responded to your communications, do not bombard them with further emails.

Senior year

  • Organize formal site inspections
  • Communicate with coaches in a timely way
  • Apply to colleges and universities, as well as for financial aid. Sign a contract and make a commitment to a school and program
  • Obtain information on the summer workout program

Tips to keep in mind:

  • Student-athletes are only permitted to attend five official visits per year. Junior colleges, Division 3 and NAIA schools as well as certain Division 2 schools continue to recruit throughout the senior year. Set up tryouts and ask the appropriate coaches to attend
  • Keep track of the deadlines for:
  • College applications
  • NCAA and/or NAIA Eligibility Center registration
  • Final transcripts
  • Proof of high school graduation
  • NCAA Amateurism Certificate
  • And FAFSA.

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When does recruiting start for baseball?

According to the results of the 2018 NCSA coach’s survey, the majority of collegiate teams begin recruiting athletes during their sophomore and junior years. Category 1 is the only division in which recruiters will be actively seeking new players during the freshman year. Take a look at the NCAA’s Division 1 rule changes and how they will affect early recruitment. What is the process for getting invited to baseball camps? Return to the top of the page

How do baseball coaches recruit?

According to the results of our poll, coaches use a variety of avenues to discover recruits. When it comes to recruiting, the majority of Division 1, Division 2 and junior college coaches turn to travel team relationships, but the majority of NAIA coaches look to baseball camps as a primary source of recruits. Athletic directors and coaches from the NCAA Division I, II, and III, as well as junior colleges, are most likely to actively analyze athletes they have identified as possible recruits while at showcase camps and travel tournaments.

Recruits are more likely to be evaluated by NAIA coaches during personal workouts with the student-athlete, according to the organization. Take a look at the list of NCSAAAU baseball affiliates. Return to the top of the page

What division level is right for me?

In the beginning of the recruitment process, one of the most crucial tasks athletes will take is a self-evaluation of their expectations and abilities. At this time, the athlete’s family and existing coach will be extremely helpful, as they will be able to assist the athlete in better understanding the division levels to aim for. This part of the procedure is crucial since it will have an impact on the schools that the family investigates. Here are some important questions that candidates should ask themselves:

  • Is it possible for me to meet the requirements of being a collegiate baseball player? Baseball in college necessitates a level of dedication that goes above and beyond a student’s academic obligations. Pre-game practices, training sessions, home games, and travel will all be scheduled. It has been demonstrated that the time required to play baseball in college—depending on the division—is about similar to a 40-hour work week. Am I talented enough to play college baseball? Which division level will be the greatest fit for the available talent? At this point, it is appropriate to call in the athlete’s present coach to provide an assessment of the athlete’s existing skill sets, athleticism, and potential for progress. Students should also watch collegiate games at each different division level to gain a better sense of the grade of play on the field of play. They can also be examined by a third-party organization such as the National Collegiate Sports Association (NCSA) in order to better grasp the appropriate division levels depending on their athletic ability.

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Research schools and create your target list

The act of researching colleges and universities is a key initial step in the recruitment process. As student-athletes construct their list of colleges to visit, here’s a simple method for organizing them:

  • 5–10 safety schools: These are the schools that athletes like to attend. Nothing is guaranteed when it comes to selecting a college, but there are colleges for which the athlete more than satisfies the academic criteria as well as the athletic requirements. Candidates should communicate with these coaches early in the process to show their interest, so that they are prepared in the event that one or more of their target schools does not materialize. 10–15 schools that should be targeted: All of these colleges and baseball programs are excellent fits
  • They are at the top of the athletes’ wish lists and are considered recruiting priorities. Schools in the 5–10 percentile are reached: These colleges, which are often known as “dream schools,” would be a financial, academic, and athletic stretch for a recruit in terms of both financial and academic resources. However, athletes thrive in a competitive environment, and adding these institutions to the list is a worthwhile aim to pursue.

This list will evolve as candidates proceed through the process, and it will serve as a dynamic recruitment tool. Occasionally, a school that was first favored is shown to be a poor match. Among the potential candidates is a so-called “Cinderella school.” Continue to update the list as the recruitment process progresses to ensure that it is accurate. Return to the top of the page

Create an attention-getting skills video

“Attention-getting” does not imply the use of special effects, flashy editing, or dramatic music to attract attention (this should be avoided). We’re talking about a film that will put the athlete on a coach’s radar and on their list of prospects they want to pursue further down the pipeline. Skills videos are a key tool for recruits in establishing their personal brand and evaluating their athletic ability. In many situations, it is the primary means by which coaches evaluate a recruit’s athletic ability.

  • Keep the video to a maximum of five minutes in length. Make use of your greatest abilities while maintaining a strong focus on the essential skills that are relevant to your position Once again, this is a skills video
  • If coaches are interested in seeing game film, they should request it. Make sure you’re completely warmed up before you start recording.

Learn more about how to make an effective skills video by reading this article. Return to the top of the page

Reach out to the schools on your target list

  • Introduce yourself to the college coach by sending an email to him. An email with a compelling subject line will compel the coach to open the message. Recruits should provide their graduation class, grade point average, job, relevant statistics, and whether or not a video is linked. A recruit’s introduction email is most likely to be responded to by a coach if they believe the recruit is a good match for their program and if the prospect possesses excellent key metrics. If you do not receive a response to your email, follow up with a phone call to the coach. All coach correspondence should be responded to in a timely way. In addition to recruitment letters and emails, direct communications and social media are also used to acquire new employees. In the eyes of the coach, a fast reaction suggests that the athlete is well-organized and has a strong work ethic. Keep instructors up to speed with transcript changes, improved statistics, and new skills videos on a consistent basis. In a recent triumph, express your gratitude, and encourage them to come see you compete

For additional information on how to contact college coaches, please see our College Recruiting Guide. Return to the top of the page

Attend travel tournaments, college camps and showcases to get exposure to college coaches

These competitions are critical for college coaches in terms of finding potential players, particularly at the Division 1 level. According to the NCSA’s data, more than 90 percent of coaches at these elite schools credit partnerships with travel teams as their major source of recruitment. Camps and tournament showcases are where more than half of the NAIA, Division 3 and junior college coaches we polled said they locate their prospects. Return to the top of the page

Manage the baseball recruiting process

What does it mean to be in charge of the baseball recruiting process? What are the responsibilities? It entails taking the initiative and being committed to seeing the project through to completion. Recruits are expected to respond to any messages from coaches in a timely way. Recruitment is not complete until a coach extends an offer, thus candidates must take all necessary efforts to ensure that they remain on his or her radar.

The timeline provided below will assist prospects in ensuring that they are in the proper place at the appropriate time in the baseball recruiting process. Return to the top of the page

Keep all social media platforms professional

Students-athletes can easily become oblivious to their social media presence and the content they publish, which can be detrimental to their careers. Scholarship offers, on the other hand, have been withdrawn as a result of social media crimes such as indecent images, abusive language, and dubious retweets or reposted postings, among other things. In exceptional situations, invitations to attend a college or university have been turned down. Recruits should not allow a single tweet to ruin all of the hard work they have put in.

More information about handling the recruiting process may be found here.

Understanding scholarship offers and how to negotiate

Baseball scholarships that cover the entire cost of attendance are extremely unusual. The fact that baseball is an equivalency sport means that coaches will distribute their restricted scholarships (for example, 11.7 per team at the Division 1 level) among their respective lineups. Families seeking to lessen the financial load of education will want to check for academic scholarships that will allow the student to attend a college and try out for the team as an unrecruited walk-on candidate (in this scenario, it is crucial the student-athlete confirms with the coach prior to enrollment that they will be allowed to try out for the team).

Offers from other institutions are the most effective negotiation weapon an athlete has.

For more information on bargaining methods, please see ourCollege Recruiting Guide.

See also:  How Big Is A Little League Baseball Field

College baseball National Signing Day—sign with your top school

All that is left is for the recruit to sign a formal commitment to attend the university of his or her choosing. Many athletes accomplish this by signing a National Letter of Intent (NLI), which is a legally binding contract that commits the athlete to attending a college or university for one academic year while also committing the institution to providing the player with the financial assistance that has been agreed upon. Because not all colleges employ the NLI, the recruit should inquire as to whether or not they will be required to sign a paper.

It is only fitting that athletes should be able to commemorate this significant milestone in their lives.

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Are You Being Realistic or Just Dreaming About Playing College Baseball?

It is the fantasy of every youngster who wears a uniform to hit balls into the stands at Safeco Field or strike out Jose Altuve in the final out to win the game. College baseball is the next step for 98 percent of all of those youngsters, but are you being realistic about your chances of making it there in the first place? My experience recruiting at the College Baseball/NCAA level began when I began recruiting at the level six years ago. I quickly learned that an increasing number of athletes are making selections based on false expectations for their baseball career path.

The most essential thing to remember is to be grounded and realistic about what you truly want in life.

Here are a few suggestions to assist families get through these difficult times while being realistic about their place in the next level of education. BLOG »»What our Prospect United Partners provide to our Athletes and Teams.

  1. The schools/levels who are speaking with you will be able to tell you where you would be the greatest match at this time. For those who are new to the recruitment process, this is the finest piece of advise I can provide them. In current days, one of the most typical things I see is athletes sitting around waiting for offers from huge power conference institutions, but who haven’t had a single interaction with any Division 1 programs at all. A Division 3 player is most typically someone who speaks with only a number of Division 3 colleges as well as a junior college. The most important thing is to make sure you present yourself correctly and then to trust the process. There is a clear understanding of what we are seeking, and the schools/levels for which you are a good fit will reach out to you, while the schools/levels for which you are not a good fit will not reach out to you. So take it easy and enjoy the process
  2. BASEBALL IS OVER FOR EVERYONE, AND EDUCATION IS IMPORTANT! I believe that individuals lose sight of this from time to time. Baseball, as a sport, must come to an end for everyone at some time. When this occurs, it is time to transition into the “real world.” You must ensure that you place yourself in a position where you can continue on track with your ambitions for life once baseball has concluded. Transferring to three or four different colleges in an attempt to discover a road to professional basketball only results in non-transferable credits and extra/repeated years of schooling. When selecting a college, be certain that they provide the course of study that you are interested in. You will not have the opportunity to complete your degree later in life, so do it while you have the opportunity. YOUR TOOLS DETERMINE THE LEVEL YOU GO TO, AND YOU ARE THERE BECAUSE OF WHAT YOU HAVE DONE. The degree of school to which you will be recruited will be determined by your athletic abilities and tools. Your physical strength, athleticism, speed, and velocity, among other things. As a senior right-handed pitcher with a fastball that sits at 84 mph on the radar gun, you will not be eligible to play for a Division 1 team. It is what it is, and it is not the “kiss of death,” nor are you a failure as a result of it. It just indicates that you are better qualified to proceed to a higher level. So many times, I see athletes hold out for scholarships that aren’t forthcoming and lose out on greater chances because they believe they “haven’t been noticed yet” by the high-level colleges in which they compete. …. COLLEGE BASEBALL IS AVAILABLE EVERYWHERE, and you’ve been noticed. However, your instruments aren’t quite up to the task. You don’t have to be on ESPN or the PAC 12 Network to play terrific college baseball
  3. You can play it anywhere. There are many of ‘dudes’ scattered across Division 2, Division 3, NAIA, and junior college levels. If you aren’t having real talks with Division 1 colleges in high school, which includes regular phone calls, then you aren’t that person, and that’s perfectly fine with me. Go to a Division 3 institution and become an All-American. If you are a person who has what it takes to continue his career beyond college, it will happen regardless of where you are playing. These days, far too much money and effort is expended on scouting to simply miss out on potential talents. The most crucial thing is to ACTUALLY BE ON THE TEAMS. If you’re on the roster at a school like Florida State but never go on the field, you’re going to have a difficult time being noticed by professional scouts. You may easily put an end to your goal of becoming a professional football player by just going to a place where you don’t belong and sitting on the bench for the entire season. Going to a lesser school and getting your foot in the door is preferable to going to a Power 5 conference institution and sitting on the bench. BLOG »»The One and Only Way to Get Hired – TOOLS

Last but not least, make this decision with your family rather than relying on other influences such as high school coaches, summer coaches, or friends. When all of the offers are on the table and you’ve done your homework on the advantages and disadvantages of each one, you and your family can make the best option for you and your family. This is the last piece of advice I provide to recruits. If you are being told things by people who are not directly engaged and who do not work at the college level, try not to get caught up in them.

Take it easy and enjoy the journey!

BLOG »»Recruiting in Major League Baseball @ Big League Edge

How to Get Recruited to Play College Baseball

Consequently, your first inquiry is: what information would a homeschool parent have on how to be recruited to play collegiate baseball? Everything about homeschooling is simple, and after our son decided that he wanted to play baseball in college, we knew that we would have to figure out the procedure on our own, as we had done with everything else. A lot of what we learned may be applicable to anybody attempting to compete in collegiate sports, but the particular of baseball will be discussed in this article.

Most College Athletes Don’t Receive Athletic Scholarships

As for the first argument regarding playing college baseball in general: if you’re spending all that money on teams, travel and lessons in order to receive a scholarship, it would definitely be better spent on SAT prep rather than college baseball. The fact is that Division I institutions are permitted to provide 11.7 baseball scholarships, while Division II schools are permitted to award 9. According to one source, this translates to 5,423 scholarships for the NCAA alone! However, you should hold off on signing up for their recruitment service for the time being.

What is the average number of players on a college football team?

Some clubs have a total of more than 11 pitchers on their roster.

The sport of baseball will not offer your son with a full scholarship to college unless you are a left-handed pitcher with a fastball that is 90 miles per hour or faster.

Pay attention to the numbers

Make sure you read the NCAA’s website on the likelihood of continuing to compete in sports after high school graduation. This website includes a fantastic table that shows the various sports and the amount of players at each level. It displays a total of 36,011 NCAA baseball players competing for the 5,423 available scholarships. Of course, Division III athletes who do not earn scholarships are included among the participants. However, the scholarships include Division I and II colleges, which may not necessarily provide the entire amount of funding for their baseball scholarship programs.

Here’s even more food for thought on how baseball may help you pay for your college degree.

According to the NCAA, 7.3 percent of high school seniors participate at the collegiate level.

When mitigating circumstances are taken into consideration, such as the fact that not all participants will even attempt to advance to the next level or the caliber of the teams’ players, the actual number of players may climb to three or four for that specific game.

It Takes More Than Just Talent to Be Recruited to Play College Baseball

This brings us back to the initial issue of “what kind of large scholarship did your kid receive.” Now, here’s something more to think about. In most cases, those players in the game who go on to play at the collegiate level aren’t always the greatest on the field. The players that are enrolled in college are divided into two groups. The first group comprises of individuals who were thought to be among the top 100 blue chip prospects in the country and have been on the coaches’ radars since they were in ninth grade, according to ESPN.

In this category, athletes who learned how to recruit themselves, often without the assistance of a single instructor, participate in games.

In reality, it’s very similar to the game of baseball itself.

And then there are the players who are given playing time because they are always willing to work hard, even when the rest of the squad is merely going through the motions of the game.

Will Recruiting Services Help You to Play College Baseball?

So, what exactly are you supposed to do? The “easiest” method would appear to be to engage a business to handle the procedure for you–this would be appropriate for folks who had a few thousand dollars to spend. However, you should be informed of what the service delivers and what you will still be required to accomplish. Depending on the provider, they’ll create a recruiting film using footage you submit and send it to a large number of college coaches at the same time. In the best-case scenario, they’ll have a better understanding of the positions/players that the institution is seeking for than you have and will target them accordingly.

  • The gamer will still be responsible for supplying the film.
  • For many families, having someone other than the parent remind the child that he or she has to pick up the phone and make the call or that they need to study for the SAT is beneficial.
  • If it saves the parent from having to nag their children, it’s a win-win situation for both parties.
  • There are a plethora of books and websites that provide advice on how to complete the task yourself.
  • The key is to begin looking into the procedure as soon as your son’s senior year has begun!
  • By the sophomore year, students should be thinking about college recruiting.

(You may use theDIY College Rankings Baseball Spreadsheet to assist you.) To be clear, this does not imply that it is too late to start if you are a senior; rather, the sooner you begin, the more straightforward the process becomes.

What’s Next

I’m providing this information just as a method to compile all of the materials I’ve discovered on how to be recruited to play college baseball, some of which have been used and others which have not, in one convenient location. Remember that the procedure will differ from player to player, so these are only some of the tools you may use to organize your journey through the process. As for my kid, he has received offers from three D3 colleges to play on their teams. But, perhaps more crucially, he left the team before the conclusion of his sophomore year because he wanted to be more active in other elements of collegiate life, rather than just football.

What comes next?

  • Getting Selected to Play College Baseball: Timelines for Selection
  • 5 Ways to Become a More Informed Prospect for College Baseball
  • When it comes to being recruited by colleges, high school baseball players have a lot to think about. What College Baseball Coaches Look for in Prospects
  • An absolute must-read for all high school baseball players and their families
  • Six characteristics that all high school baseball players should have on their athletic profile
  • Do you want to get recruited to play baseball for a college team? Make a map for them
  • Using an Athletic Recruiting Service
  • Should You Use One? A must-read article about the chances of receiving an athletic scholarship while participating in college sports.

Take the time to research the colleges that will recruit you and download your free copy of the DIY College Rankings Baseball Spreadsheet.

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