Who Is Considered The Greatest Baseball Player Of All Time

Top 10 Best Baseball Players of All Time [2022 Update]

Baseball is the oldest sport in America, and it is played in all four major leagues. MLB has bestowed onto its fans some of the most illustrious names in the athletic world. For the same reasons as other sports, baseball does not escape the discussion about who is the best player to ever play the game. Using player statistics and careers to determine the greatest player of all time, we compiled a top 10 list of the finest players in history. Only teammates will be included on our list. Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig were two of baseball’s greatest players.

10. Roger Clemens

  • Boston Red Sox, Toronto Blue Jays, New York Yankees, and Houston Astros
  • Two World Series appearances and one National League MVP award

The tenth slot on our list is held by “Rocket”Roger Clemens, who was named American League MVP in 1986. Despite the fact that his career has been marred by controversy, ranging from receiving special treatment to steroid usage, one thing cannot be denied: Clemens is one of the finest pitchers the Major League Baseball has ever seen. Roger Clemens is a baseball player from the United States. Clemens has won the Cy Young Award seven times in a row, which is given to the greatest pitcher in the league.

Clemens is the only pitcher in Major League Baseball history to have 350 victories and 4,500 strikeouts in a season.

Likewise, his career WAR of 139.2 ranks him second among pitchers and eighth all-time in terms of wins above replacement.

Over the course of his professional career, he posted an ERA of 3.12 in 24 seasons.

9. Stan Musial

  • The St. Louis Cardinals are three-time World Series champions and three-time National League MVPs.

Stan Musial is widely considered as one of the most consistent and prolific hitters in the history of the Major League Baseball. Musial played 22 seasons for the Cardinals, winning three World Series titles and three National League MVP honors during his time there. He also has the second-highest combined total of 24 All-Star appearances. Stan Musial is a musician and composer from the United States (Source: Redbirdrants.com) In addition, he has seven National League hitting championships and two National League RBI leader honors to his credit.

Musial’s career totals of 3,630 hits and 724 doubles place him second in the majors in each of the individual categories.

Louis Cardinals.

Nine Major League Baseball players have come out as gay.

8. Walter Johnson

Walter Johnson, one of the all-time great pitchers, is the next name on our list to be discussed. No other pitcher during his time period was as dominant as he was. Walter Jhonson is an American actor and director. Over the course of his 20-year professional career, Johnson was named to the All-Star team 12 times for his strikeout total. Furthermore, his record of 110 career shutouts is still undefeated and remains unbroken. In the same way, his strikeout total of 3,058 was unbroken for 56 years.

In 1923, he became the first person to reach the milestone of 3,000 strikeouts.

In the end, Johnson had two MVP honors, one World Series championship, and three Triple Crown championships to his credit. Among the first class of players to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936, he also earned a position on our ranking of the “100 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time.”

7. Lou Gehrig

Because of his consistency and expertise as a batter, Lou Gehrig was given the moniker “The Iron Horse” by his teammates. Gherig is the first player in the history of Major League Baseball to have his jersey number retired by the organization. His number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939. He concluded his career with a 340 batting average, 493 home runs, and 1995 runs batted in, as well as a 340 batting average. Lou Gehrig was a baseball player who passed away in 2004. (Source: Latimes.com) Greig earned six World Series championships throughout his professional career.

Between 1925 and 1939, he appeared in 2,130 straight games for the New York Yankees.

Greig had the opportunity to continue his streak, but he was forced to retire due to illness.

Later that year, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

6. Ty Cobb

  • Because of his consistency and expertise as a batter, Lou Gehrig was given the moniker “The Iron Horse.” With his uniform number being retired by the organization, Gherig makes history as the first player in MLB history to do so. His number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939, the year he passed away. To cap off his career, he hit 493 home runs and drove in 1995 runs. His batting average was 340 and he drove in 493 runs. Lou Gehrig’s baseball career was cut short by illness (Source: Latimes.com) Greig was a six-time World Series champion throughout his professional career. Furthermore, he is a two-time MPV, a seven-time All-Star, and a one-time triple crown champion. The Yankees used him in 2,130 straight games from 1925 through 1939, which is a major league record. For 60 years, the record stood. The sickness that Greig was suffering from prevented him from continuing on his streak. His retirement speech, entitled “Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth,” was held at Yankee Stadium and became an instant classic. Later the same year, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Several historians and members of the media have also referred to Ty Cobb as one of the finest baseball players of the dead-ball era. During his playing career, he is well-known for breaking a number of world records. Furthermore, several of his records have remained unbroken to this day. Ty Cobb is a baseball player that was born in the state of Georgia. Cobb now holds the record for the greatest lifetime batting average in baseball history with a 366. In addition, he owns the record for the most batting champions with 12, as well as the most stolen bases with 54.

Later in his career, he concluded with 4,191 hits and 2245 runs, placing him in second place on the all-time list in each of the aforementioned categories.

Cobb has also won the MVP award and the Triple Crown on one occasion.

5. Ted Williams

Due to his military duty during World War II and the Korean War, Ted Williams was unable to play in three seasons during his prime. Nonetheless, his professional achievements are sufficient to position him in the top five. He is frequently referred to as the “purest hitter” in the history of baseball. Ted Williams is a baseball player who was born in the United States (Source: Military.com) Furthermore, his career on-base percentage of.482 ranks him first all-time in the major leagues. He is also the last player to bat above.400 in a single season, which he accomplished in 1995.

In his professional career, Williams has won three championships and two MVP awards.

In a same vein, he was named to the All-Star team every season during his 19-year professional career. Later, in 1966, he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The Top 10 All-Time NBA Players, according to ESPN.

4. Hank Aaron

  • Baseball players with the Indianapolis Clowns, Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, and Milwaukee Brewers
  • One World Series appearance, one National League MVP.

Hank Aaron, widely regarded as one of baseball’s all-time great power hitters, is the next name on our list. He is most known for breaking Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record. Aaron’s 755 career home runs place him in second place on the all-time home run list. Likewise, he is the all-time leader in RBI with 2,297 runs, total bases with 6,856, and extra-base hits with 1,477. He is also the all-time leader in runs scored with 2,297 runs. Aaron’s remarkable strength is demonstrated by the records themselves.

In addition, he was named National League MVP and World Series MVP in 1957.

The Baseball Hall of Fame inductee was inducted into the organization the following year.

3. Barry Bonds

  • Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants
  • 7-time National League MVP

The 14-time All-Star is the next player on our list. Barry Bonds is a baseball player from the United States. He is a well-known personality in baseball, both for his playing career and for the drugs crisis that engulfed the sport. Unfortunately, despite being eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2013, he did not obtain the necessary number of votes to be inducted. The usage of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) was cited as the cause by BBWAA voters. However, we must not lose sight of the impact Bonds had on the game of baseball.

Barry Bonds is a baseball player from the United States (Source: Instagram) He is well recognized as a spectacular hitter.

In addition, he has garnered eight golden glove trophies for his defensive play.

Despite the fact that Bonds does not have a World Series championship to his credit, he is a highly sought-after 7-time National League MVP.

2. Willie Mays

  • The New York/San Francisco Giants and the New York Mets have won one World Series and two National League MVP awards, respectively.

When it comes to excellent all-around baseball players, Wille Mays is the perfect illustration of what I mean. Despite the fact that Mays’ offensive numbers are not as impressive as those of other players, his overall performance places him second on our ranking of the “Best Baseball Players” of all time. Willie Mays is a baseball player who plays in the Major Leagues (Source: The Newyork Times) With 660 home runs, he is the sixth most prolific home run hitter in baseball history. He was the National League’s home run leader four times.

In a similar vein, he was the driving force behind three stolen bases.

Likewise, it is tied for second place in terms of All-Star appearances.

In a same vein, he won his lone World Series championship in 1954. MLB changed the World Series MVP award in 2017 to the Willie Mays World Series MVP award in honor of the legendary baseball player. A year after his death, Mays was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

1. Babe Ruth

  • Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, and Boston Braves
  • 7-time World Series champion, one-time American League MVP, and member of the MLB All-Time Team

Babe Ruth maintains the highest place in baseball history, if not the highest position among the best baseball players of all time. Furthermore, he is well-known even among people who do not follow baseball. Ruth transitioned from being a pitcher to being one of the greatest hitters in baseball history despite beginning his career as a pitcher. Babe Ruth was a baseball player who played in the Major Leagues. Over the course of his career, he was the American League’s leading home run hitter on 12 occasions.

  • Aside from that, Ruth’s slugging percentage of.690 is the greatest of all time.
  • Ruth was also a superb pitcher, concluding his career with an ERA of 2.28, good for third among starters, and 17 shutouts, placing him third among all-time greats.
  • Ruth only earned the MVP award once in his career.
  • However, the regulations at the time stipulated that the player could only receive the prize once.
  • Ruth’s notoriety as the “Major League Baseball goat” extends beyond his playing career, though.
  • Ruth was also the first athlete to ever sign an endorsement agreement, which made her even more notable.

Summary

The athletes on this list were chosen based on their statistical records and overall accomplishments during their careers. Our ranking of the greatest baseball players of all time does not include any players who are currently active or from the contemporary age. It’s interesting to note that more than half of the athletes had previously served in the United States military. Let’s take a brief glance at the executive summary.

  1. Babe Ruth, Willie Mays, Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron, Ted Williams, Ty Cobb, Lou Gehrig, Walter Johnson, Stan Musial, and Roger Clemens are among the baseball greats.

Top 10 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time

The Babe Ruth, Willie Mays, Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron, Ted Williams, Ty Cobb, Lou Gehrig, Walter Johnson, Stan Musial, and Roger Clemens of baseball are among the greatest players in baseball history.

Greatest Baseball Players of All Time | 2022 Updates

Baseball had also been the subject of several issues, such as the betting and doping scandals. However, there were many outstanding players who left their imprints on the hearts of a large number of baseball fans as well. So, without further ado, here is the list of the top ten best baseball players in history.

10. Nolan Ryan

  • 8-time Major League Baseball All-Star
  • 11-time MLB Strikeout Leader
  • 2-time MLB NL ERA Leader
  • Member of the Major League Baseball All-Century Team

As the Chief Executive Officer of the Texas Rangers, Nolan Ryan has a long and distinguished career in Major League Baseball. He also serves as an executive advisor to the Houston Astros. Because of his average pitching speed of more than 100 miles per hour, he is usually recognized as one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history. During his professional baseball career, he pitched as a right-handed pitcher for the New York Mets, the California Angels, the Houston Astros, and the Texas Rangers, among other teams.

Eleven times he was the Strikeout champion, and eight times he was named to the MLB All-Star team.

His uniform number 34 was retired by the Houston Astros and Texas Rangers as a mark of respect for him. In 1999, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame for his contributions to the game.

9. Stan Musial

  • 24 times named to the Major League Baseball All-Star team
  • 7 times named to the MLB National League Batting Champion team
  • 3 times named to the MLB National League MVP team
  • Member of the Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Walter Johnson, a former Major League Baseball player, passed away on January 19, 2013, at the age of 92. Stan the Man was the moniker given to him throughout his 22-year baseball career, which he spent as an outfielder and first baseman with the St. Louis Cardinals from 1941 to 1963. Stan is largely considered to be the best hitter in the history of baseball. Aside from baseball, he was also a World War II Navy veteran who served in the Pacific Theater. He blasted 475 home runs and racked up 3,630 hits for a batting average of.331, which was a career high.

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Musial also won three World Series championships and was awarded the National League’s Most Valuable Player three times throughout his career.

As a mark of respect for him, the St.

In 1969, he became the first African-American to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

8. Walter Johnson

  • MLB AL strikeout leader 12 times
  • MLB AL win leader 6 times
  • MLB AL ERA leader 5 times
  • MLB All-Time Team member
  • Major League Baseball All-Star team member

From 1907 through 1927, Walter Johnson was a right-handed pitcher with the Washington Senators, where he spent his entire 21-season baseball career. He was known as “The Big Train” because of his large build. He had a career high of 3,508 strikeouts and was the first player in baseball history to reach the 3,000 strikeout mark for more than 50 years. Johnson has the #1 position in the all-time shutout list with 110 victories. In addition, he is ranked second on the all-time list with 417 victories and fourth with 531 full games, putting him in a tie for second place overall.

He was also named to both the Major League Baseball All-Century Team and the Major League Baseball All-Time Team, among other distinctions.

He died on December 10, 1946, at the age of 59, and was buried in New York City.

7. Joe DiMaggio

  • 13-time MLB All-Star
  • Nine-time MLB World Series Champion
  • Three-time MLB American League MVP
  • Member of the Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Joe DiMaggio was an American Major League Baseball player who spent his entire 13-year professional career as a center fielder for the New York Yankees, earning him the moniker “The Yankee Clipper.” He had a batting average of.325 and 2,214 hits, as well as 361 home runs in his career. His fans have regarded him as one of the most prolific home run hitters in Major League Baseball history up to this point. In addition, he owns the Major League Baseball record for the longest hitting streak in the league’s history, at 56 games.

The New York Yankees retired his uniform number 5 in recognition of his contributions to the franchise.

In 1955, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. In a poll conducted in 1969, Joe was voted the greatest living player in the sport. On March 8, 1999, he passed away at the age of 84.

6. Ty Cobb

  • Joe DiMaggio was a center fielder for the New York Yankees for his entire 13-year Major League Baseball career, earning him the nickname “The Yankee Clipper.” He was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn. 2214 hits and 361 home runs were recorded during his career, for a batting average of.325 and 2,214 hits. His supporters have regarded him as one of the most prolific home run hitters in Major League Baseball history up until the present. As a result of his MLB hitting streak, he owns the record for the longest in the league at 56 games. Joe is the only player in baseball history to have won nine World Series titles and been named the American League Most Valuable Player on three separate occasions. New York Yankees jersey number 5 was retired in recognition of his contributions to the franchise. For his career, he was rated fifth on the all-time home run list and sixth on the all-time slugging percentage list with a.579 mark. 1955 marked the year that he was officially admitted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. An opinion survey conducted in 1969 ranked Joe the best living athlete in the sport. In 1999, he died at the age of 84, according to his death certificate.

Tyrone Cobb was a former Major League Baseball outfielder with the Detroit Tigers who retired after 22 seasons in the league. He played his last season with the Philadelphia Athletics before retiring. He holds the record for being the youngest player to ever amass 4,000 hits and score 2,000 runs. Among his many accomplishments, he has the greatest career batting average of.367 and the most career batting crowns with a total of 12 victories. His illustrious career included 4,191 career hits, 2,246 lifetime runs, 3,035 career appearances, and 11,434 at-bats, all of which were career highs.

He also won the American League RBI title four times and the American League hitting title twelve times.

In 1966, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

5. Ted Williams

  • 19-time MLB All-Star
  • Six-time MLB American League Batting Champion
  • Four-time MLB American League Home Run Leader
  • Member of the Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Ted Williams, a former professional baseball player in the United States, was widely considered as the best batter to ever live and was known as “The Kid.” He compiled an unblemished record of.344 batting average,.482 on-base percentage, and 521 home runs, all of which remain unbroken. During his prime, he set a number of unbreakable MLB records in the area of hitting. During his career, Williams won the American League Most Valuable Player award twice and the hitting title six times. While playing baseball, he was named to 19 All-Star teams and won the Triple Crown on two separate occasions during his career.

Williams was named to the MLB All-Time Team in 1997 and to the MLB All-Century Team in 1999, respectively.

He passed away on July 5, 2002, at the age of 83.

4. Hank Aaron

  • 25-time MLB All-Star
  • Three-time MLB Gold Glove Award winner
  • Four-time National League Home Run Leader
  • Member of the Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Hank Aaron, a retired American baseball player, is the only player to have hit more than 30 home runs in a season more than 15 times in his professional career. From 1954 through 1974, he was a right fielder for the Atlanta Braves of the National League, and from 1975 to 1976, he was a right fielder for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American League. Aaron earned the Gold Glove Award three times in a row and was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player for the first time in 1957. Additionally, in 1957, he was crowned World Series champion.

The Hank Aaron Award, named in his honor in 1999, recognizes the best offensive players in each league, and it was first presented in 1999.

Atlanta Braves in 1977, and the Milwaukee Brewers in 1976, both retired his jersey number 44 as a tribute to him.

3. Willie Mays

  • A 24-time MLB All-Star, a 12-time MLB Gold Glove Award winner, two-time MLB National League MVP, and a member of the Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Willie Mays, a retired American baseball player, set a record by winning a Gold Glove award a record 12 times, beginning in the first year the award was given out. He was a centerfielder for the San Francisco Giants and the New York Mets during his professional baseball career. “The Say Hey Kid,” as his admirers dubbed him, was born. Mays was named the National League Rookie of the Year in 1951 and went on to win the World Series in 1954. He was named National League Most Valuable Player twice and MLB All-Star Game Most Valuable Player twice.

From 1957 to 1968, Willie got the Gold Glove Award a total of twelve times.

Willie was ranked second on The Sporting News’ list of the 100 greatest baseball players in the history of the sport in 1999, the highest ranking ever achieved by a live player. In 1979, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, which he has held since.

2. Barry Bonds

  • 14-time MLB All-Star
  • Eight-time MLB Gold Glove Award winner
  • Seven-time MLB National League MVP
  • And twelve-time MLB Silver Slugger Award winner

Barry Bonds is the son of All-Player outfielder Bobby Bonds, and he was a former American baseball star. Barry still has a position among the best baseball players in the history of the Major League because of his incredible accomplishments, which include 73 home runs in a single season, 762 career home runs, and eight straight seasons with a slugging percentage greater than.600. When Bonds was picked by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1985 Major League Baseball Draft, he was the sixth overall choice.

From 1992 until 2004, he hit more than 30 home runs in a single season 13 times in a row, the longest streak in baseball history.

He has also been on the cover of Sports Illustrated eight times, which is a personal best.

1. Babe Ruth

  • 2-time Major League Baseball All-Star
  • 7-time MLB World Series Champion
  • 12-time MLBAL Home Run Leader
  • Member of the Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Babe Ruth, the legendary American baseball player, continues to retain his position as the best baseball player that has ever lived. During the Roaring Twenties, his captivating abilities earned him the nicknames “The Sultan of Swat” and “The Bambino,” which he earned from his admirers. He began his professional baseball career in 1914 as an outfielder and pitcher with the Boston Red Sox, and eventually transferred to the New York Yankees in 1920, where he played for 15 seasons. Babe Ruth achieved a slew of records during his career, including 714 career home runs, a.690 slugging percentage, 2,213 RBIs, and a 1.164 on-base plus slugging percentage.

His uniform number 3 was retired by the New York Yankees as a mark of respect.

His shirts are still considered to be among of the most valuable pieces of sports memorabilia because of the level of recognition he earned.

Conclusion

Fans love the numerous intriguing information that are included, as well as the many renowned players, who are also included. Jimmy Piersall hit his 100th home run while round the bases backwards as a celebration of his accomplishment. Bobby Richardson holds the distinction of being the first player to be named the World Series Most Valuable Player while playing for a losing team, which is an intriguing piece of information. The batting averages of the Garbank brothers were precisely the same at the end of their season.

Greatest Baseball Players | Infographics

Greatest Baseball Players in the World Infographics We hope you enjoyed our list of the best baseball players in history. Don’t forget to share your thoughts with us in the comment section below.

FAQs Regarding Greatest Baseball Players

Henry Chadwick, a baseball pioneer, is a man about whom little is known. Throughout his professional baseball career, he utilized the letter S to represent sacrifice and the letter K to represent a strikeout.

In addition, he picked K since it is a significant letter in the term strike, which was used more frequently than the phrase “strikeout.” The K symbol is used to symbolize a swinging strikeout in certain systems, whereas the K symbol is used to signify a hitter who was caught looking.

Q. What does Vaseline do to a baseball?

When using Vaseline or saliva, the baseball gets smoother, however when using emery paper, the baseball becomes rougher. Doctoring is a phrase that is used to refer to any type of ball manipulation that takes place.

Q. Has there ever been a 27 strikeout baseball game?

He was struck out 27 times while batting and throwing right-handed. During a nine-inning game for the Class-D Appalachian League on May 13, 1952, Necciai had a strikeout total of 27 hitters. He is one of just a handful of pitchers to accomplish this accomplishment in a professional game that lasts nine innings (as of this writing).

Q. Has anyone hit 5 home runs in a game?

Pete Schneider (1923), Lou Frierson (1934), Cecil Dunn (1936), and Dick Lane (1939) are the only players to hit five home runs in a single game (1948). Lipman Pike hit five home runs in the pre-professional period in 1866, which was also the year he was born. The most recent update was made in February 2022.

Top 10 Best MLB Players of All Time

One of the most popular diversions (among fans of America’s Pastime) is debating the relative merits of the sport’s best players in terms of rankings. The elder fans will gravitate toward the men of their generation, whilst the younger followers would romanticize the men of the generation in which they grew up. While there may not be a unanimous choice for the best player in Major League Baseball, as there is in the NBA, the objective is not to choose a winner, but to take pleasure in the argument.

10. Walter Johnson

Since his professional career came to an end more than 90 years ago, Walter Johnson may not be a household name for many people. Despite the fact that it has been more than a decade since The Big Train retired, we are still talking about his incredible 21-season career, which featured 417 victories, 110 shutouts, a sub-2.00 ERA, and a mind-numbing 531 finished games in 666 starts, to name a few highlights.

9. Pete Rose

The fate of Pete Rose has been the subject of some of the most heated arguments in sports history over the last 30 years. Although he finished his playing career as the all-time hits leader, with 67 more than Ty Cobb and over 500 more than Hank Aaron, he didn’t get to complete his playing career. Without being nabbed for gambling, he may have become the world’s first person to reach the 5,000-point milestone. Charlie Hustle is currently mostly remembered as the best player who is not a member of the Hall of Fame.

8. Jackie Robinson

In spite of the fact that Jackie Robinson is commonly referred to as the first black baseball player in the Major Leagues, he was really the first after 40 years after segregation occurred in the sport, with numerous players having been in the league before 1884. However, while this difference is significant, it is not the sole factor contributing to his inclusion on this list. Rather, his six World Series appearances, six All-Star appearances, NL MVP and batting crowns, two-time base stealing leader, and Rookie of the Year accolades serve as the driving force behind it.

The fact that he accomplished this under intense scrutiny and in the face of widespread criticism simply adds to his brilliance.

7. Mickey Mantle

There should be some debate concerning the use of this particular moniker. Based on whether or not you are a fan of the New York Yankees, you may place him much higher or lower on this list, but no one will ever place the Commerce Comet lower than the top 10 on this list. Having won seven World Series titles and making appearances in twelve and sixteen All-Star games, he was the last Triple Crown player to have topped all three categories in the same season, and he is largely considered as the guy who pioneered switch-hitting.

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6. Ty Cobb

Pete Rose and Ty Cobb are the only players in Major League Baseball history to have reached the 4,000-hit plateau. Cobb, on the other hand, accomplished much more than simply putting the wood to the ball, having set more than 90 records over the course of his career, some of which are still in effect 90 years after his departure. Some of these include being the player who stole home the most times, stealing all of the bases in a single game, and being the youngest player to get 4,000 hits and 2,000 runs.

Even if he doesn’t hold any records anymore, he is still in the top two or three, or at the absolute least in the top five, in the world.

5. Stan Musial

Finally, we’re getting into some of the really talented guys. Stan Musial participated in 24 All-Star games, including 22 consecutive games, and he would have been in even more if he had not been called up to serve in World War II. He has the second-highest number of bases in baseball history, and he has established other records during his career, including hits, RBIs, at bats, runs scored, and doubles. His swing, which was renowned for its flawless consistency, is still studied by players of all levels as a tutorial on how to properly get the job done at the plate.

4. Ted Williams

In addition to Ted Williams, who had some flashy figures that would have been much more remarkable had he not been called up to serve in the military during World War II, Ted Williams had some terrible stats right out of the gate as a professional baseball player. A total of 19 All-Star Games were played by him, and he was the last player to bat over 400 in a season. He was one of just two players in history to have won the Triple Crown twice, and he was still winning American League hitting crowns in his 40s.

3. Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth’s name is still associated with baseball and is a fan favorite to this day. The Babe, who was known as much for his antics as for his play, not only helped the Yankees to their record-breaking run as the winningest team in all of sports history, but he did so with a charisma and confidence that is still emulated by kids on sandlots everywhere, who call their own shots before they take a swing. With seven World Series Championships to his credit, he was also a 12 time American League home run leader, a six-time American League RBI leader, and a fairly excellent pitcher, finishing with a career ERA of 2.28 and topping the American League in that category while with the Boston Red Sox.

Speaking of Boston, not only is Ruth credited with guiding the Yankees to success, but he is also largely recognized for inflicting the 86-year championship drought that has plagued the city since his departure, known as the Curse of the Bambino.

2. Hank Aaron

Hammerin’ Hank has played in 24 All-Star Games, which ties him with Willie Mays and Stan Musial for the most in the history of the game. He surpassed Babe Ruth to become the all-time leader in home runs, a record that he maintained until the steroid era, and which many would say continues to exist now. In addition, he played in more games than all but two other players, and he still holds the marks for most RBIs, extra base hits, and total bases in baseball history. He was one of just two players in baseball history to hit more than 30 home runs in 15 seasons, and he hit more than 20 in every season save his first and last two.

1. Willie Mays

Willie Mays, the other player to appear in 24 All-Star Games, was regarded as the greatest player of all time. With his ability on both sides of the ball, the Say Hey Kid earned 12 Gold Gloves, was a four-time home run and stolen base leader, was named National League Rookie of the Year, was twice named National League MVP, and once hit four home runs in a single game. Mays, who combined Ruth’s power and charm with Musial’s consistency, is also remembered for his defensive performance, with “The Catch” still being regarded as one of the most incredible plays in New York history, combining the best of both worlds.

The Say Hey Kid was, without a doubt, the best player in the history of the game.

Top 15 Best Baseball Players Of All Time In MLB

Who are the greatest baseball players of all time, and what do they look like? Everywhere in the globe, sports have had a profound influence on the lives of countless individuals. Deep and joyful relaxation, as well as the elimination of nerve-wracking emotions, have been accomplished via its use. It has also contributed to the strengthening of links of solidarity and goodwill between many individuals all over the world. Baseball is one of these sports, and its popularity is largely due to the vivacity of its players, who have captivated audiences across the world with their outstanding performances on the field of play.

In this post, we’ll take a look at the top 15 best Baseball players of all time, ranking them according to their achievements and honors.

The MLB Best Baseball Players Of All Time

Clemens, sometimes known as “Rocket,” was a former pitcher with the New York Yankees who enjoyed a spectacular 24-year career in Major League Baseball. He played the most of his 24 years in the Major League Baseball, primarily with the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in the history of the Major League Baseball, with 354 victories in his career. He was a key contributor to the New York Yankees’ two World Series championships and was selected to 11 All-Star games.

Session after session, his playing style was intensely competitive, and his pitching was characterized by long, powerful pitches. Nonetheless, this playing strategy of his proved to be beneficial in assisting him in achieving more victories.

14. Mickey Mantle

WikimediaMickey Mantle was widely regarded as the best switch-hitter in the history of baseball by many people. Mantle was one of the most dangerous offensive center fielders in the history of the Major League Baseball. He was a member of the New York Yankees throughout his whole Major League Baseball career (1951-1968). Mantle was one of the most dangerous offensive threats to come out of the center field position in baseball history. He was the recipient of the MVP award three times. Mantle won the Triple Crown in 1956, and it was his most successful season in baseball games during that time.

With his retirement from the New York Yankees team in 1968, he brought his baseball playing career to a close.

13. Greg Maddux

When the name Greg Maddux is spoken, the first thing that springs to mind is his time as a pitcher for the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs. He is well-known for his accomplishments throughout his time with the two major league baseball organizations. He put up a nice display as a productive pitcher for the two clubs in which he played. He was a member of the Atlanta Braves that won the World Series in 1995. He was the only pitcher in big league history to win four consecutive Cy Young Awards in the same season.

During the 1990s, Maddux won more games than any other pitcher in the league.

Very few baseball players get elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in their first year of eligibility, which is something Maddux did.

12. Honus Wagner

Wikimedia Given that we are living in an age where just a few of people remain, we must look to the annals of history to grasp the accomplishments of this elite baseball shortstop, who played 21 seasons in the Major League Baseball from 1897 to 1917, nearly completely for the Pittsburgh Pirates. When Wagner won his seventh and final combat championship in 1911, he had accomplished his goal. That accomplishment has now established an uninterrupted National League record that has stood for more than a century.

Baseball historians consider Wagner to be one of the all-time great shortstops, as well as one of the finest players in the history of the National League.

There you have it, the lengths to which Wagner went to prove how amazing he was during his playing days.

11. Rogers Hornsby

Wikimedia Hornsby has 23 seasons of Major League Baseball experience to his credit. Aside from being a baseball infielder, he also worked as a baseball instructor. During his 23-year career in Major League Baseball, he was twice named the National League’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) and was a key contributor to the Cardinals’ one World Series triumph. Hornsby made his Major League Baseball debut in the colors of the St. Louis Cardinals, where he earned his first Most Valuable Player (MVP) title after a series of stops with various minor league organizations.

In the opinion of many baseball fans and sports analysts, he is among the best players in the history of the sport.

Hornsby was inducted into the National Hall of Baseball Fame in 1942, and he was inducted into the St. Louis Hall of Fame in 2014, along with 22 other former players, in recognition of his illustrious career.

10. Cy Young

Wikimedia Almost a year after his death, the Cy Young Award was established to recognize his achievements as a baseball player and to honor him as a great baseball player. Young made his big league debut with the Cleveland Spiders of the National League in 1890, more than a century ago. In all, he pitched for the franchise from 1898 to 1902. Later in his career, Young transferred to the American League, where he played for the Boston Red Sox, who he assisted in winning one World Series championship in 1903.

9. Stan Musial

Wikipedia Musial played in the Major League Baseball for 22 seasons. He only played for one team, the St. Louis Cardinals, but he made a great impact on the game of baseball with his presence. He was a baseball outfielder and first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals, with whom he earned three World Series victories in his career. His remarkable performance led to widespread acclaim for him as the best hitter in the history of the sport. He was elected into the Sport Hall of Fame just a few years after he announced his retirement from baseball.

Louis Cardinals Baseball Hall of Fame in 2014.

8. Lou Gehrig

Wikimedia Mr. Lou Gehrig was an American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the New York Yankees from 1923 to 1939. He was known for his strength and durability on the field of play. The American League’s Most Valuable Player title went to him on two occasions, and he appeared in seven consecutive All-Star games during that span. He was also a three-time winner of the Triple Crown. After retiring from baseball in 1939, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

7. Walter Johnson

Walter Johnson was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was a member of the Washington Senators for 21 seasons throughout his time in the Major League Baseball. Many considered him to be one of the finest pitchers in the history of the sport. He establishes a number of amazing pitching records, the most of which remained unbroken for over nine decades following his retirement from baseball. In 1936, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.

6. Ty Cobb

Wikimedia Ty Cobb is another name to consider while compiling a list of the best baseball players of all time. He was one of the best outfielders the Major League Baseball has ever seen. In the course of his career, he is credited with setting 90 Major League Baseball records. Cobb still owns a number of Major League Baseball records as of the conclusion of the 2019 season. In the 1999 edition of Sporting News’ ranking of baseball’s 100 greatest players, Cobb was placed third, which should come as no surprise.

5. Ted Williams

Wikipedia Ted Williams is considered to be one of the greatest hitters in the history of baseball. In his youth, he began to participate in baseball and no doubt this had an impact on his development into one of the top hitters in the game when he made his professional baseball debut with his first professional baseball team. He spent 19 years as a member of the Boston Red Sox, where he won two World Series championships.

His career included 19 All-Star appearances, two American League Most Valuable Player awards, two Triple Crown titles, and six American League hitting titles. He was also voted the American League Most Valuable Player in 2004 and 2005.

4. Hank Aaron

Hank Aaron is another player who is widely regarded as one of the all-time greats in the sport of baseball. During his 23-year career in Major League Baseball, he played right field for the Milwaukee Brewers and the Atlanta Braves. He appeared in 25 All-Star games, earned three Gold Glove awards in a row, and helped the Milwaukee Brewers win a World Series title in his career with the team. In their 1999 edition of the “100 Greatest Baseball Players,” Sporting News ranked him seventh among the game’s greatest players.

3. Barry Bonds

Bonds’ 22nd season in the Major League Baseball had a run of good fortune. Many trophies were bestowed upon him, including a record 12 Silver Slugger medals, which he received throughout his career. He was selected to 14 All-Star games and finished first in the Major League Baseball in on-base plus slugging six times. Bond is unquestionably one of the finest baseball players in the history of the Major League Baseball (MLB), due to his ability to play all aspects of the game.

2. Willie Mays

Two National League (NL) Most Valuable Player honors and a record-tying 12 Gold Glove trophies are sufficient evidence of Mays’s contributions to the Major League Baseball (MLB). Unsurprisingly, many people consider him to be one of the best players in the history of the Major League Baseball. According to the Sporting News, he was placed second on their list of the 100 greatest baseball players of all time. After retiring from baseball, Mays was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame, where he was recognized for his accomplishments a few years later.

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1. Babe Ruth

Wikimedia This is unquestionable. Babe Ruth, the legendary baseball player, is unquestionably the best of the best. Ruth is widely regarded as the best baseball player in history by sports analysts, fans, and coaches in baseball. Ruth is, in fact, considered to be one of the greatest heroines in American history. During his 22-year career in the Major League Baseball, he was the recipient of several accolades and trophies, as well as the holder of numerous MLB records. As of 2019, a handful of his Major League Baseball pitching records were still standing.

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Conclusion

There you have it: our definitive ranking of the greatest baseball players in history. Please feel free to share your opinions with us in the comment space provided below.

ESPN ranked the 100 greatest baseball players of all-time and I have questions

Given the lack of baseball news to report during the off-season, ESPN turned to the archives and asked its writers to rate the greatest 100 baseball players of all time. The results are below. This is an extremely difficult work, and I have a great deal of respect for many of ESPN’s baseball writers, so I have no doubt that they took this task very seriously. The list, on the other hand, raises a number of questions in my mind.

Are we already calling Bryce Harper one of the greatest 100 players of all-time?

First and foremost, I am not a Bryce Harper hater; in fact, I believe he is one of the finest players in baseball, as seen by his two MVP trophies. I believe that if he has a good second half of his career, he will be on his way to Cooperstown in the near future. But do you already consider him to be one of the top 100 players in the history of the game? Harper is ranked 94th on ESPN’s list, which seems a little high for a player who is only 28 years old. You know who else has won two MVP awards by the age of 28?

He had a.290/.339/.568 slash line with 301 home runs and a 135 OPS+ up to that time, which was not far behind Harper’s.279/.392/.524 slash line with 267 home runs and a 142 OPS+.

Harper is a far superior defender, but we should take a deep breath before placing him in the same category as Hall of Famers Jim Thome and Barry Larkin.

Is Nolan Ryan overrated?

When I was a youngster, Nolan Ryan was one of my idols. He possessed a fastball that was larger than life, he threw seven no-hitters, and he was still productive in his 40s. He was like a tall tale on the stomping ground. However, I believe that some of that legend has overvalued him in the eyes of many people. He was the league’s leading walker eight times, and he was the only player to record more than 200 free passes in a season twice. He never won a Cy Young Award and just twice finished in the top three of the pitchers’ WAR rankings.

With a result, his ERA+ is 112, which places him in the same league as players such as Al Leiter and Frank Viola.

Despite the fact that Nolan Ryan is a slam-dunk Hall of Fame candidate, I wouldn’t place him nearly as high on this list.

Was Pete Rose better than George Brett?

Pete Rose is ranked 34th on ESPN, and George Brett is ranked 43rd. They were contemporaries from the same era, and both had clubs that were significant competitors on a consistent basis. But, once again, I believe that myth-making triumphed over fact in this case. Pete is known for his popular single and the alias “Charlie Hustle.” Brett was a fierce competitor on the field, and he was regarded as one of the game’s greatest clutch batters during his time. When comparing Brett and Rose, their batting averages (.305 for Brett and.303 for Rose) and on-base percentages (.369 for Brett and.375 for Rose) are virtually identical, but Brett’s slugging percentage is nearly 80 points higher (despite the fact that he is playing in a pitcher’s park, as opposed to the home run-friendly Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati).

He also graciously retired at the age of 40, although Pete Rose remained in the game until the age of 45, penciling himself into the starting lineup as the Reds’ player/manager.

Because of his strength and defensive prowess, I would choose George to Pete in this situation.

Did Negro League players get overlooked?

Josh Gibson is rated 35th, Satchel Paige is ranked 41st, and Oscar Charleston is ranked 53rd, making them the only three players in the top 100 who spent the most of their careers in the National Basketball Association’s Negro Leagues (Roy Campanella, Jackie Robinson, Ernie Banks, Hank Aaron, and Willie Mays also spent some time in the Negro Leagues). Many consider Satchel Paige to be the greatest pitcher of all time, or at the very least to be among the very best of all time. Ted Williams referred to him as “the greatest” and argued for his induction into the Hall of Fame at a time when no players from the Negro League were represented in Cooperstown.

  1. Dizzy Dean, a Hall of Famer, claimed that Satchel was superior to him.
  2. Josh Gibson is widely regarded as one of baseball’s all-time great power hitters.
  3. Over 800 home runs are thought to have been hit by him, with one estimate putting the total at 965.
  4. Bill Veeck, a long-time executive, referred to him as “two Yogi Berras.” Then there’s Oscar Charleston, who’s a bit of a jerk.
  5. The alternative is that this is approximately accurate, that he was one of the finest — if not the greatest — baseball players who ever lived, and that the majority of Americans were completely unaware of this.
  6. Players in the Negro League had far less mainstream media coverage, and their records were incomplete in such disparate environments that it is practically hard to determine how excellent they were in comparison to other players in baseball history.

However, failing to include any of them in the top 30 may be doing them a disservice.

Can a reliever be among the 31 greatest players in history?

The majority of this is really nitpicking on my part, but one segment made me laugh out loud in a genuine way: Bob Gibson (number 33) Sandy Koufax (number 32) Mariano Rivera is ranked number thirty-one. Let’s take a look at their numbers, shall we?

Pitcher rankings

Players WAR IP K ERA ERA+
Players WAR IP K ERA ERA+
Bob Gibson 81.7 3884.1 3117 2.91 127
Sandy Koufax 53.1 2324.1 2396 2.76 131
Mariano Rivera 56.3 1283.2 1173 2.21 205

If Sandy Koufax was the greatest pitcher who ever lived, his Hall of Fame case would be completely based on only five seasons, five of the most dominant seasons a pitcher has ever put up, but it was only five years and then he was forced to retire due to injury. Meanwhile, Bob Gibson was a contemporary who also dominated – albeit not quite to the same level – but who was outstanding for a much, much longer period of time, compiling a 137 ERA+ throughout his 13-season peak before fading at the conclusion of his career.

Mariano Rivera is without a doubt the greatest closer in baseball history and a lock for the Hall of Fame.

Koufax, who pitched for only 12 seasons, faced a greater number of batters than Mariano Rivera.

Did most great players actually play from 1960-1990?

I did my best to categorize each player on their list according to the era in which they played (you can quibble with some of the players whose careers crossed eras). The following is a breakdown of the data by era:

Breakdown of the Top 100 list

Era Number
Era Number
Before 1920 11
1920-1940 12
1940-1960 10
1960-1980 24
1980-2000 25
Post-2000 18

Is it conceivable that more than half of the best players in history played between 1960 and 2000? It is conceivable. Many have referred to the period immediately following World War II as the “golden age of baseball.” Another possibility is that athletes who competed before baseball was integrated should be disqualified from consideration. Another possibility is that the era with the most representation is the one in which today’s journalists grew up watching and covering players. In this case, I couldn’t really hold it against them – can I really comment with any authority about how brilliant players were who I never got to see?

What are your thoughts?

The greatest baseball players of all time

The greatest of all time exists in every sport, but there are a few sports where there are undisputed GOATs, such as in basketball, swimming, and baseball. Basketball has Michael Jordan, swimming has Michael Phelps, and baseball is one of the few sports in which there is a unified greatest of all time.

Babe Rut

Is one of these greats; he is widely regarded as the best baseball player of all time, and no one will argue otherwise; he belongs to the small exclusive club of greats who are universally regarded as the undisputed GOATs of their respective sports. The “Sultan of Swat” began his Major League Baseball career as a famous left-handed pitcher with the Boston Red Sox, but he is best known as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees, where he earned his nickname. Back in 1914, when he made his major league debut, there was just a meager 27 home runs in a season on the all-time list.

Babe Ruth was the American League’s leading home run hitter on 12 occasions.

He was so dominant in the Major League Baseball that he blasted 602 long balls in a nine-year span, while no one else hit more than 300!

Moreover, this legend was just as well-known off the field as he was on the field! The most successful baseball teams in the history of the sport

Willy Mays

Inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame Mays was a center fielder who spent the most of his 22-year MLB career with the New York/San Francisco Giants before concluding with the New York Mets. He was born in New York City and raised in San Francisco. Mays, also known as the “Say Hey Kid,” is widely recognized as the best all-around player in baseball history, as well as the best center fielder of all time. In his Major League career, he amassed 3,283 hits, including 660 home runs, while posting a.302 batting average and a 156 OPS+.

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Barry Bonds

The term “steroid” seems to overshadow Bonds in most conversations, but aside from that, he is regarded as a baseball great. A total of 762 home runs (including a single-season high of 73 in 2001), seven career MVP awards, eight Gold Gloves, and 688 intentional walks have been awarded to him, which is more than double the amount awarded to the player who ranks second all-time in that category and a testament to the unparalleled fear Bonds instilled into opposing pitchers. Bonds spent his whole Major League Baseball career with the Pittsburgh Pirates and the San Francisco Giants.

Ted Williams

Ted Williams, a Boston Red Sox icon, is frequently referred to as “the best pure hitter who ever lived.” His career on-base percentage of.482 is the greatest in baseball history. Williams spent his entire professional baseball career with the Boston Red Sox, and if it weren’t for his three years of service in the United States military during World War II at the peak of his career (as did DiMaggio), and two years during the Korean War, his career stats would have been significantly higher. In 1941, Williams had a batting average of.406, which remains a Red Sox record to this day.

Hank Aaron

Hank Aaron is considered to be one of the best hitters in baseball history because to his 755 home runs. But Aaron’s abilities didn’t end there; he concluded his career with the second-highest batting average (.305) and second-highest number of runs scored (2,174) in major-league history, and he earned three Gold Gloves along the way. He was known as “Hammering Hank” during his time with the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, and he also spent two seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers throughout his career.

Walter Johnson

The Washington Senators were the home of this pitching great for the entirety of his professional baseball career. Affectionately known as “Big Train,” Johnson hurled 110 complete-game shutouts in his career, which remains the most in major-league history and a mark that will never be broken.

The two-time MVP is the only pitcher in big league history to amass more than 400 victories and strike out more than 3,500 hitters in a single campaign. The most successful teams in the National Football League

Stan Musial

“Stan the Man” was a legendary baseball batter who was one of the finest and most consistent hitters in baseball history. Despite serving in World War II, he played his whole 22-season MLB career with the St Louis Cardinals, where he established himself as a cultural hero both during and after his MLB career. During his time with the Cardinals, Musial led them to three World Series championships (1942, 1944, and 1946), while also earning three MVP honors (1943, 1946, and 1948). At the end of his retirement, he owned or shared 17 major league records, 29 National League records, and nine All-Star Game records, among other accomplishments.

Musial was awarded with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama in February 2011.

Ty Cobb

Cobb was an outspoken bigot, an unrepentant racist who habitually sharpened his spikes in order to maximize the possible hurt he might cause to opponents; he was the baseball villain. Despite his unpopularity, Cobb still has the greatest hitting average in the game, with a.366 mark, and he has never had a season in which he batted below.316. Cobb played 22 seasons for the Detroit Tigers, where he set multiple MLB records during his career. He was named to the All-Star team in 2004. In his final six seasons with the franchise, he served as its player-manager, and he completed his career with the Philadelphia Athletics.

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