How To Break In A Baseball Bat

How to Break in a Baseball or Softball Bat: Step-by-Step Guide

As technology has progressed, so has the evolution of baseball bats, and the necessity of prepping your equipment for action has become an accepted aspect of the game. There’s no need to be concerned about breaking in a wooden bat when you purchase one online. It’s ready to go right off the shelf. Additionally, when purchasing an aluminum alloy bat, the majority of these bats are “hot out of the wrapper,” which means they are ready to use right away. However, when you start looking at composite bats, which are likely to be your most effective tool for success, the following suggestions on how to break in a bat will help you to utilize your new timber to its utmost extent possible.

  • Exactly why you’d want to break in a bat
  • Instructions on how to break in a composite baseball bat and a softball bat
  • What bat rolling is and whether or not it is allowed

Why Do I Need to Break in My Bat?

Many individuals are perplexed as to why they are required to break in a bat. You might be wondering why these pricey bats don’t arrive pre-assembled and ready to use straight from the factory. These are all reasonable issues, but the reason for breaking in a bat is straightforward: It is just not possible for composite bats to perform to their maximum capacity until they have received at least a couple hundred hits. The majority of single and double wall aluminum alloy bats are ready to use as soon as you remove them from their packaging.

While all bats are made to fulfill particular requirements based on the league and regulations in place, bats that are fresh off the production line have not been tested or put through a rigorous testing process.

As we’ll discuss later, some people are afraid that this procedure may harm the bat’s life, but as we’ll see later, you won’t be utilizing all of your power or strength while breaking a bat in.

But How Do I Break in My Composite Bat?

The procedure for breaking in a composite baseball bat is straightforward. You’ll be ready to go when the season gets underway if you follow these simple procedures when you first obtain your bat and stick with them. In most cases, depending on your stamina, this procedure will not take more than an hour to finish completely. In order to properly break in your bat, you will need to take anywhere from 150 to 200 swings, so you may want to enlist the assistance of a few buddies to assist you. You’ll need to do the following in order to break in your bat:

  • Hit the ball off of Atee’s back
  • Toss a soft ball against a barrier
  • Allow a colleague to make a pitch to you

Most bats have a rotation index stamped on them, which will act as a guide for you during this simple three-step break-in procedure. In the majority of cases, you may utilize the logos on the bat to divide the barrel into four halves.

  1. Strike a tee full of legal baseballs approximately 100 times – remember to rotate the bat a quarter turn with each swing, and don’t strike with full force at first. As you accumulate more swings, you should increase the power level. As you accumulate more swings, you should increase the power level. You should then take around 50 swings of soft toss or front toss, keeping in mind that you should rotate the bat by a quarter turn with each swing. Finally, you must confront live pitching from a pitcher who is throwing at least 40 miles per hour to complete the break-in procedure. Take 50 swings with the bat during batting practice, rotating the bat a quarter turn with each swing

If you’re interested in learning how to break in a softball bat, you may use the same procedure.

Make sure to keep the following things in mind when you’re getting your bat up to speed:

  • You should never swing a composite bat until the wind is blowing at least 70 degrees
  • Else, you run the danger of denting or shattering your bat.
  • When breaking in a new bat, you should use actual baseballs or softballs rather than rubber balls used in batting cages, which will not have the same impact and may potentially harm your bat. Don’t spin the bat and don’t include this swing in your count if you mishit a ball off the handle or hit a weak foul ball.

Should I – and can I – ever roll my bat?

If you’ve spent enough time on the fields, you’ve probably heard of the practice of bat rolling. Bat rolling is the process of compressing a baseball bat by placing it in a rolling machine. When you roll your bat, it produces a trampoline effect when it makes contact with the ball. An un-rolled bat will have a trampoline effect, which means that when your bat makes contact with the ball, the ball will jump off much more quickly than when your bat is rolled. Although bat rolling is unlawful, it will also violate the manufacturer’s guarantee, hence it is not recommended.

  • A significant increase has been observed for much of the past decade in the usage of doctored bats, placing all players, but particularly pitchers, at risk for health problems.
  • If you take a piece of paper and wrap it around the bat, you will be able to feel the lines in the barrel.
  • You should have no problems with your new composite bat.
  • Also, make sure to read our glove break-in advice to ensure that your glove is in peak condition.

Composite Bat Break-In Guide

Have you just purchased a fresh new composite bat? Are you interested in learning more about composites? As you may be aware, composite baseball and softball bats require a time of “break-in” before they can perform at their peak levels during games and exhibitions. In contrast to metal bats, which are ready to use right out of the package, composite bats require a bit more time to warm up. The purpose of this “break-in” phase is to release the resin that has accumulated inside the barrel, allowing the material to respond more quickly when it comes into contact.

  • Composite bats are high-performance items with a lifespan that is directly proportional to the amount of hits they have received during their lifetime.
  • This method should be carried out progressively in order to guarantee that the bat is properly broken in.
  • 1.
  • Between each hit, make sure to spin the bat by 14 inches.
  • Hit 50 balls from a tee with around 75% of your maximum power.
  • 3.
  • Between each hit, make sure to spin the bat by 14 inches.

Hit 50 balls from the soft throw with 100 percent of your strength.

5.

Between each hit, make sure to spin the bat by 14 inches.

Use 100 percent of your strength to hit 50 balls off a pitching machine or live pitching.

The pitching speed should be between 75 percent to 100 percent of the fastball speed you are used to facing on a regular basis.

It will take around 300 hits for your composite bat to be broken in and ready for game use. As previously stated, the longevity of a composite bat is directly proportional to the number of hits it receives, thus we recommend saving your bat for game usage only once it has been broken in.

Steps to Break in a Composite Bat for Baseball & Softball Bats

“Can you tell me how to break in a composite bat?” This is a question we see frequently from players who have recently purchased new composite bats and are not receiving optimal performance. And with good reason. Unlike wood baseball bats or metal baseball bats, which can be used right out of the package, composite baseball and softball bats must be broken in before they can perform at their peak. We’ll go through the three stages you should follow while breaking in a composite bat in the section below.

Why Do Composite Bats Need Breaking In?

Composite bats only reach their maximum capacity once a couple of hundred hits have been accumulated. The fact is that composite bats require breaking in and are not “hot out of the wrapper,” despite what the marketing implies. These bats require 200 or more hits, which might take a long time to complete. As a result, composite bats must be ‘prepped’ before they can be used in ordinary games. We’ve been able to confirm this via our testing: composite bats perform better once they’ve been broken in.

How Do I Break in My Composite Bat?

This procedure is rather short and simple to complete. Following the methods outlined below will ensure that your composite bat is ready to go when you go up to the plate on game day. After you’ve completed the workouts listed below, you should have a bat that is completely broken in within an hour. In case you become fatigued, enlist the assistance of a buddy. This technique necessitates around 150–200 nice, firm hits. Never use a composite baseball bat unless the temperature is at least 70 degrees Fahrenheit or more.

Whenever you’re breaking in a new bat, only utilize regulated balls that are legal to play in a real game to avoid injury.

Step 1 – Take 50 Hits off a Tee at 50% Power. Rotate With Each Hit

Start with 50 percent of your maximum power for 50 hits. If you begin to crush the balls with full force straight away, you run the danger of shattering your composite bat, which is a costly mistake. Keep in mind to spin your bat either an eighth or a quarter turn with each hit. This will guarantee that the whole barrel of your bat is broken in in a consistent manner. The rotation index of the majority of composite bats on the market today should serve as a reference for you during the break-in process.

As a result, you’ll have four good hits on each of the four bat faces, for a total of eight solid hits.

Each turn is referred to as a “quarter turn” in this context.

Step 2 – Take Another 100 Hits From Soft-Toss at 75% Power. Rotate With Each Hit

For the second stage, begin with 50 swings, either with a soft toss drill or a regular swing drill. During this phase, use just 75% of the force that you would normally use to strike a baseball while hitting a baseball. After 50 hits, switch to full power for an additional 50 hits.

If you mishit a ball or hit a weak foul ball, don’t include it in your hit total, and don’t spin your bat as a result of it. The safety of your pitcher is crucial during this phase, so make sure you have a L screen in place to protect them from potentially deadly hits.

Step 3 – Make 50 Solid Hits at Full Strength to Complete the Break-in Process

Once you’ve performed 150 hits, you may begin to work your way up to hitting at full strength throughout the remainder of the game. It should only take approximately 50 nice, solid hits to obtain the projected 200 hits necessary to fully break in your composite bat, which is a significant savings over buying a new bat. To accompany you to the field, ask a pitcher with a strong arm to join you. If this isn’t possible, search for a pitching machine that accepts actual baseballs rather than rubber cage balls, which can cause damage to your bat and other equipment.

You must go at a speed of at least 40 miles per hour.

A different amount of time may be required to break in a certain type of bat depending on the seller or the manufacturer.

When we broke in our Rawlings Quatro USABat, we saw a little increase in ball departure speed compared to our previous bat (about 1 mph faster after clocking 200 swings when breaking it in)

Accelerated Break-In Techniques:Should You Roll Your Bat?

Bat rolling is a method of accelerating the break-in process. It is applied to composite bats in order to reduce the amount of time required to achieve optimal performance. Essentially, this method works by compressing the composite fibers in the barrel and loosening them as a result of the compression. When the barrel is further compressed during the process, it produces an additional flex or trampoline effect when it comes into contact with the ball. The first thing to remember is that bat rolling is illegal if you’re playing in a high school or collegiate league.

  • It isn’t worth the trouble.
  • Read more aboutaccelerated break-in techniques and their legality.
  • Hopefully, you now have sufficient knowledge to fully and properly break in your composite baseball bat.
  • Please leave us a comment below.

How To Break In A New Composite Bat

Following the purchase of a new baseball or softball bat, the first question to consider is whether or not you will need to break it in at all. If you’ve invested in a composite bat, the answer is definitely yes. Most aluminum bats, on the other hand, do not require a break-in period and are ready to use right out of the package. When it comes to breaking in your composite bat, the procedure is nearly painless and should take no more than an hour.

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Use a Game Ball

In order to properly break in your new bat, it is necessary to utilize a regulation ball that would be legal in a competitive environment.

This will have the most beneficial impact on your bat and will help to protect the bat from being damaged by the ball during the match.

Rotate 1/4» After Each Swing

It is critical that you rotate your bat a quarter of an inch after each swing when you are breaking in your new baseball bat. By rotating your bat after each swing, you can ensure that the whole barrel of the bat is being properly broken in and broken in properly. When it comes time to go up to the plate, the bat will be at its peak performance as a result of this.

Hit 150 balls at 50%

Using a tee or a gentle throw is the best way to break in your bat when you first begin hitting with it. Due to the fact that the first 100-150 balls should be struck with just half of your normal swing speed and strength, this is the case for the first 100-150 balls. In the event that you begin crushing balls at full speed with all of your might, you face the danger of damaging the composite bat.

Work Your Way Up to Full Speed/Strength

Following 100-150 hits at half speed and strength, you may begin to transition into your typical swinging motion. This should take little more than 50 extra hits or fewer to accomplish the goal.

Step Up to The Plate!

Your bat should be ready to utilize in a game environment once you have completed 200 hits with it. Although it is not recommended, if you ever feel that your composite bat has not yet reached its full breaking-in potential, there is no harm in taking a few more practice hits before entering the batter’s box.

How to Break In a Baseball Bat

The original version of this article published on BaseballMonkey.com. As technology has progressed, so has the evolution of baseball bats, and the necessity of prepping your equipment for action has become an accepted aspect of the game. There’s no need to be concerned about breaking in a wooden bat when you purchase one online. It’s ready to go right off the shelf. Additionally, when purchasing an aluminum alloy bat, the majority of these bats are “hot out of the wrapper,” which means they are ready to use right away.

You’ll learn the following things from this guide:

  • Exactly why you’d want to break in a bat
  • Instructions on how to break in a composite baseball bat and a softball bat
  • What bat rolling is and whether or not it is allowed

Why Do I Need to Break in My Bat?

Many individuals are perplexed as to why they are required to break in a bat. You might be wondering why these pricey bats don’t arrive pre-assembled and ready to use straight from the factory. These are all reasonable issues, but the reason for breaking in a bat is straightforward: It is just not possible for composite bats to perform to their maximum capacity until they have received at least a couple hundred hits. The majority of single and double wall aluminum alloy bats are ready to use as soon as you remove them from their packaging.

While all bats are made to fulfill particular requirements based on the league and regulations in place, bats that are fresh off the production line have not been tested or put through a rigorous testing process.

As we’ll discuss later, some people are afraid that this procedure may harm the bat’s life, but as we’ll see later, you won’t be utilizing all of your power or strength while breaking a bat in.

Generally speaking, it takes longer for composite bats to reach their optimal performance, which is why you should always break your bat in before playing a regular game on a regular basis. ​

Baseball Monkey

Baseball Monkey is a prominent retailer of baseball and softball equipment for players of all ages and skill levels, including youth and recreational. In collaboration with one another, our experienced team created a one-stop resource center of material aimed to assist players in navigating the plethora of issues that arise as they prepare for the next baseball season. Since 1999, MonkeySports, Inc. has provided services to athletes all around the world. The fact that we employ gamers who are enthusiastic about the game, the gear, and the consumer allows us to provide professional customer service and product expertise.

  1. has six brick-and-mortar locations and six websites that are well-established.
  2. Baseball Monkey is a prominent retailer of baseball and softball equipment for players of all ages and skill levels, including youth and recreational.
  3. Since 1999, MonkeySports, Inc.
  4. The fact that we employ gamers who are enthusiastic about the game, the gear, and the consumer allows us to provide professional customer service and product expertise.
  5. has six brick-and-mortar locations and six websites that are well-established.

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How To Break-In A Composite Bat — 18YB

Composite bats differ from wood and aluminum bats in that they are made of a composite material. They are often constructed from a variety of various materials, with the majority of them using some kind of carbon fiber and other composite materials. The debate between composite and metal bats has been a topic of discussion for quite some time. The break-in period for aluminum and wood bats is completely unnecessary. They are completely assembled and ready to go right out of the package. Composite bats, on the other hand, require a break-in period before being used.

In this post, we want to provide answers to some of the most often asked questions we receive, such as: How do I break in a composite bat?

What is the purpose of breaking in my composite bat? (You can locate it at the bottom of this page, following our step-by-step tutorial.) We’ll get right to the point for those who prefer to skip the lecture:)

Our 3 Big Step Approach to Breaking In Your Composite Bat

The first step in our procedure is to hit a ball off of a tee. As a broad summary, you will be swinging a ball with half of your power at first, then a bit more power, and finally your maximum power with each of these three techniques.

  • To begin the break-in process, hit 50 balls off the tee with only HALF of your maximum power. After each hit, spin the bat 14 of a turn to the other side of the plate. The majority of bats are equipped with indicating markers to assist you in determining how much to modify the bat. This will help you to equally disperse the hits and break in the bat across its whole length. You want to be certain that no region is overlooked during the process
  • Thus, Use 75 percent of your power to hit another 50 balls off the tee, and then repeat the process for another 50 balls off the tee. It is critical that you remember to rotate your bat AFTER EVERY Smash
  • We propose that you hit maybe 10-15 balls off the tee with 100 percent of your power, simply to gain a better feel for and familiarize yourself with your new 2019 youth bat.

Continue with the Soft Toss Method

Soft throwing is the next activity on the list! Soft throwing, as simple as it may appear, not only promotes hand-eye coordination, but it also assists your little batter in getting a better feel for contact with his or her new youth bat. The purpose of soft toss is to simulate a ball that is traveling towards the hitting zone when the ball is in the most advantageous position for striking. A parent, coach, or teammate will sit beside the batter and throw the ball into the strike zone with his or her underhand motion.

  • The batter will soft throw the ball 75 times (we’re allowing for misses here), while utilizing just 50 percent of his or her power on each toss. We cannot emphasize how important it is to adjust the bat by 14 inches again. Step one should be repeated with 75 percent of the hitter’s power
  • To finish, be sure to obtain at least 10-20 excellent solid hits on the ball while using 100 percent of the slugger’s power.

Live Pitching OR Pitching Machine Method

  1. Please bear with us
  2. We understand that this is a time-consuming process. You will have finished the procedure once you have done this final step! It is totally up to you whether you want to use live pitching or a pitching machine. A pitching machine is recommended since the accuracy will be more constant and to your taste
  • If you choose either option, have the ball hurled at 50 percent of the regular fastball velocity. Hit 30 balls with 50 percent of your hitting power, remembering to rotate the bat by a quarter inch after each one. (Are you getting annoyed yet?)
  • Steps A and B should be repeated with a 100 percent fastball and 100 percent batting power, striking the ball for a total of 30 more times while rotating the bat 1 inch after each hit

That’s all there is to it! Your composite bat is ready to go for the big game. Although it is critical for a young batter to become familiar with his or her new composite bat, we recommend that they only use their bat when absolutely necessary, as this will help to extend the life of the bat.

TLDR; How You Should Break-In Your Composite Bat?

The process of breaking in a composite bat is a straightforward yet time-consuming one. With our three techniques of hitting (hitting off a low-cost batting tee, soft toss, live pitching, and/or pitching machine), the bat must take around 250-300 good swings. Depending on your perseverance, this might take anywhere from 1.5 to 2 hours. We encourage that you complete it in one sitting because it is MUCH simpler to do so. We also urge that you bring a teammate, coach, or parent with you to some of the sessions, such as the soft toss and live pitching, to assist you with anything you need them to.

This is due to the fact that they may have pock marks on them, which might interfere with the bat’s ability to perform properly.

Why You Really Have to Break-in Your Composite Bat?

While we’ve already provided you with an outline of the how, we’ll now discuss the why. As we briefly explained at the outset of this post, composite bats are constructed of materials that must bind together and become used to being struck in order to function properly. Simply said, they are not performing to their maximum capacity when they are originally purchased. Putting these materials through a few hundred swings will increase the overall quality of the materials. However, you might wonder: Why don’t manufacturers create bats that are ready to use right out of the box?

(See the following section for the answer.) These are just a few of the questions that our post here addresses!

What is Bat Rolling? Is Bat Rolling Illegal?

It’s possible that you’ve heard the phrase “bat rolling” before. Bat rolling is often a two-step technique that, when completed, results in a bat that looks and feels similar to a bat that has already been broken-in to your swing. As an example, consider the following two steps: Please keep in mind that we are here to educate, not to justify unlawful break-in techniques. BAT ROLLING IS NOT ALLOWED: Bat rolling is recognized by umpires, coaches, and other authorities who have received special training.

Heat rolling (heating the bat) is a technique used to loosen the composition of the bat, allowing it to roll more easily when it is heated.

There you have it, a rolled bat that didn’t require any form of “manual” break-in procedure to achieve its full potential.

A bat’s trampoline effect may be significantly increased by applying the appropriate amount of compression.

This results in a substantial increase in the pop. Despite the fact that this is a pretty unusual method of breaking in the bat, we strongly advise against it. This is only permitted in the case of home-run derbies.

Disadvantages of Bat Rolling

While we could have included some advantages to bat rolling, we like to discourage others from doing so. Here are some of the disadvantages of Bat Rolling! 1.BAT ROLLING IS NOT ALLOWED. DON’T MAKE THE MISTAKE. YOU WILL MOST LIKELY BE DETECTIVELY CAPTURED. WE FORESTOOD TO WARN YOU. 2.After rolling your bat, the manufacturer’s warranty is almost always terminated, in nearly all cases. 3.The bat’s durability and lifetime are often reduced when it is rolled about a lot. The impact of a heavy blow might be enough to crack it open.

Final Thoughts:

We hope you found our lengthy, but important, essay on preparing your composite bat for game play to be helpful. We anticipate that when new technology developments enter the market, composite bats will continue to improve in quality and performance. Despite the fact that it is a lengthy procedure, it is important that you devote the necessary time and effort to ensure that everything is ready for your son or daughter’s wedding day!

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Bat Care & Break-In

Tips and tactics to help you take care of your bat and ensure that it is properly broken in for optimal performance are provided below. The conclusion of this essay contains several unlawful break-in techniques that you should absolutely avoid at all costs. Some businesses and websites provide the service of rolling or shaving a bat. We do not encourage doing any of these because they are both unlawful and can result in a variety of problems for you.

BAT CARE

  • Individuals should only be allowed to use the bat. When the temperature is below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, do not use. It is not recommended to preserve the bat in temperatures exceedingly hot or cold. It takes a bat around 4 hours to reach the temperature that it is now at. Using the bats in cooler weather is possible as long as they are stored in a warm environment. Do not use the bat to knock dirt off of your metal cleats
  • Instead, use your hands. Baseballs and softballs with leather covers should be used in accordance with the rules. Stay away from the yellow cage balls with dimples. To hit the cage balls, it’s advisable to retain an old bat or a cheap alloy in your possession. Do not hit balls that have been soaked in water. Check your bat for signs of wear and tear on a regular basis. Rotate your bat 1/4 turn with each swing to ensure that the striking surface is distributed evenly.

BREAK IN

  • An initial break-in period is not required for aluminum and alloybats. All of these bats are “fresh out of the package,” meaning they are ready to be utilized in a game straight away
  • It is possible that compositebats will require a break-in period. In the event you believe your bat is not performing at its best right out of the wrapper, we recommend around 50-100 swings either off of a tee or via soft throw with a quarter rotation of the barrel after each swing

ILLEGAL BREAK IN PROCESSES

Shaving and rolling bats are also considered illegal. These are not recommended since they will result in the following consequences:

  • A lawsuit may be filed if someone is wounded while using a bat that has been altered. If this occurs, the owner of the bat, everyone in the batters box, and the person who altered the bat are all accountable for the outcome and may be charged with damages. You are in violation of the Manufacturer’s Warranty. You may reduce the durability of your bat by using it less.
  • Rolled bats are compressed between two rollers in order to shorten the break-in period
  • This process is known as rolling. Removal of the bat’s end-cap and shaving the insides of the bat walls is the procedure by which the bat walls are made thinner by removing the end-cap.

How to Work in your Composite Bat

We used our Rapsodo hitting equipment to evaluate the exit speed velocities of a brand new out of the package 2018 Rawlings Quatroin a 31-inch drop 10 pitching bat before and after breaking it in. It was discovered that after the 200+ swing break-in time, there was a modest increase in ball departure speed (1.0 mph faster). While we believe that the exit speed is favorably connected with the USABat Quatrobreak-in, we are not prepared to make such a claim for every bat on the market. The evidence is promising enough to believe that what manufacturers have been telling us for years is correct: composite bats perform better once they have been broken in for a period of time.

Check out our list of the best bats.

Collected Pre/Post Break in Baseball Flight Data

30 Hits Right Out of the Package Avg. Speed: 58.4mph Rapsodo Exit Velo (Rapsodo Exit Velo) 30 Hits after 200+ Work In Hits at an average speed of 59.4 mph Rapsodo Exit Velo (Rapsodo Exit Velo) Prior to the break-in, the composite exit velocity was measured. Exit Velocity Composite Following a Break-In

How We Broke in Our Baseball Bat

We must have hit the Quatro 250 times off the tee. We spun the bat between 1/8th and 1/4 of a turn between each hit, depending on the situation. We alternated between hitting the ball on the inside of the sweet area and hitting the ball on the outside of the sweet spot, which was not always successful.

We also employed a variety of batters, and we made every effort to use hitters that were far stronger than the bat required. Breaking in a Composite Baseball or Softball Bat: 6 Steps to Success

  1. Take the bat out of its packaging
  2. Make use of a tee or a gentle toss. Every time you hit a ball, spin the bat between 1/8 and 1/4 of a turn. Striking inside the sweet area first, followed by hitting outside the sweet spot alternately
  3. Continue for a minimum of 200 times—the more, the merrier
  4. Alternate batters—make use of hitters who are significantly stronger than the bat’s intended size

How Much More Exit Velocity does a Composite Break-In Produce?

We will not be able to provide a scientific solution to that issue given the limited data and resources we currently have at our disposal. Understanding gained from papers such as this one by Dr. Russell of Penn State is essential for developing better solutions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the composite Quatro’s departure speed increased once it was broken in, according to our tests. Our 30 hits average improved by 1.2mph in departure speed, or around 5 feet in distance when seen from an ideal angle.

We believe it is probable that other composite bats will behave in a similar manner in terms of break-in and variations in exit velocity.

JustBats.com is home to Quatro.

Quattro Review (Quatro Review)

How To Properly Break-In Your Baseball Bat

It is critical to spend time breaking in your baseball bat during this period since it is during this phase that you will be preparing it for play and optimizing its performance. However, in order to achieve the greatest results and avoid any potential complications, you must understand how to properly break-in your baseball bat without causing any substantial changes to it. Before you begin, make sure you understand what you’re doing to your bat. This will help you prevent any potential issues, such as questions of legality or damage to your batter’s equipment.

Alternatives To Break-Ins

If you don’t want to break in your bat or if you just don’t have the time, there are alternative alternatives available. The most popular method is to acquire a rolled softball bat, which can be found at sporting goods stores that have already been broken in. Just keep in mind that rolled bats can be perfectly OK for informal play, but they may be considered unlawful in official league games and tournaments if you want to compete in any of those events.

The Break-In Process

To begin, it is recommended that you utilize an official game ball throughout this process in order to achieve the greatest and most consistent outcomes. If you use other types of baseballs, you may not get the same outcomes as you would with game balls, resulting in lost time and effort.

Step One

Once you’ve obtained your bat and official ball, begin by hitting the ball off a tee 50 times with approximately equal amounts of speed and strength on each hit. Make careful to rotate the bat a quarter-inch after each hit to ensure that the entire area is covered.

Step Two

After you’ve completed the first round of 50 hits, you’ll need to repeat the procedure, but this time with just 75% of your normal speed and strength, as described above. You should hit the ball off a tee 50 times, rotating the bat by a quarter-inch after each hit, just like you did in the first phase of this process.

Step Three

Following that, you must remove the tee and hit the ball 50 times from soft-tossing position to complete the round.

At this point, you should still be using around 75% of your available power and rotating the bat by a quarter-inch.

Step Four

This is the point at which you can finally let go of your inhibitions and strike the ball as hard and as quickly as you are capable of. Continue with the soft-tossing and quarter-inch rotations for the rest of the game.

Step Five

After you’ve gotten through the first 200 hits, you’ll need to switch to a pitching machine to finish the job. Set the speed of the pitches to 50 percent of the regular fastball speed at which you typically strike out with your fastball. Under these new conditions, you must hit the ball 50 times with your bat—and, as usual, remember to spin your bat between hits.

Step Six

Finally, in order to complete the task, you must hit 50 further balls from the pitching machine, maintaining the rotation after each hit. Set the speed to 100 percent of the fastball speed at which you regularly hit the ball this time around to get the best results.

Ready To Use

Once you’ve learned how to properly break-in a baseball bat and have gone through the procedure, you’ll want to take extra precautions with that bat from that point on. Your bat will deteriorate with time, so storing it for when you actually need it is critical to its survival. After spending all that time breaking it in, you don’t want to be using it for every little thing that happens. 373 people have looked at this post.

Step By Step Guide of How to Break Your Bat in Correctly

Baseball was first played in the United States, but it has since expanded to other parts of the world. Today, the International Baseball Federation (IBF) has more than 100 member countries, making it the largest sports organization in the world. Baseball and softball players, on the other hand, must concentrate on their bat performance. That’s why it’s so critical to properly break in your bat before using it. You might not consider this information important if you are planning on utilizing shaved and rolled softball bats that are ready to use right away and do not require breaking in.

Ensure the Bat Needs Breaking in

If your softball bats are not shaved Miken softball bats, it is likely that they are composite softball bats. Composite bats are comprised of carbon fiber and must be broken in before they can function at their peak performance. It’s important to understand that you must hit 200 balls with your composite bat before it is considered ready for use. Additionally, if you acquire aluminum-derived bats, you will not be required to break them in.

Use a Game Ball

When breaking in your bat, utilize a game ball that has been approved by the league. By using different balls when breaking in your bat, you will end up damaging it and reducing the performance capabilities of your bat. Also, make sure the softball is at the proper temperature, which is 15 degrees Celsius, because a cold softball can harm your bat before it ever gets to the breaking point.

Use a Tee

If you’re playing softball, you’re probably used to hitting a thrown ball, but while breaking in your bat, you should use a tee. You may utilize half the strength you would normally use when hitting a softball from a tee while hitting a softball that is pitched to you.

In this manner, you may break inside the bat without causing any damage to it. In addition, make sure you hit the game ball 100 times from the tee box before moving on.

Rotate the Bat

It is critical to remember that you should break in your bat in a consistent manner. In the case of shaved Miken softball bats, the interior of the bat has been neatly shaved to provide adequate performance from whatever angle at which the softball is struck. As a result, while breaking in a new bat, try rotating it by 1/4″ before striking it to ensure that the entire circle is broken in. If, on the other hand, you miss hitting the ball, don’t flip the bat or count the balls.

Throw Short Lobs

You may think about asking your instructor to pitch the ball from close range after you have hit the ball 100 times from the tee. These are referred to as short lobs, and they are useful in breaking in your bat gradually over time. These pitches should be slow enough so that you are not injuring your bat, despite the fact that they allow for stronger swings than a tee. To achieve the best results, repeat this process at least 50 times. The advantage of purchasing shaved fastpitch bats is that you will not have to go through the hassle of determining whether or not your bat is ready to strike a fast pitch.

See also:  How Long Do Innings Last In Baseball

The 21st of March, 2020

How to Break a Bat Over Your Leg

Image courtesy of the Boston Globe/Getty Images 1 of 41 (of a total of 4) Illustrations by Mark Nerys, courtesy of the Boston Globe and Getty Images. Illustrations by Mark Nerys, part 3 of 4. Illustrations by Mark Nerys, page 4 of 4. Getting back to the introduction Whether you’re Barry Bonds or a man in your local work league, you’re likely to get hit by a pitch at some time in your baseball career. What distinguishes the two is that, when the pros become frustrated, they can pull off what appears to be an enormous act of strength, but in reality only needs a little understanding.

To get you in the mood, check out the video below, which is a collection of the most incredible bat breaks ever.

  • Bench press, barbell bentover row, pullup, military press, dip are all good upper-body exercises. Jump squats, power cleans, snatchs, lunges, and heavy medicine ball slams are all good exercises for developing strength and power.

Step 1

First and foremost, strike out. (Bonus points for bringing the inning to a close. ) When you go to your dugout, hold both sides of the wooden (not aluminum) bat at the ends and raise it to about head height with your arms extended. Also, be certain that you are a formidable human being. “This move needs more than simply physical strength; it necessitates an explosive individual,” says Tracy Baldwin, the strength and conditioning coach for the Oklahoma State baseball team. “It is not something that should be done by the average person.”

Step 2

Take a deep breath in, then push the bat downward with your leg raised toward it in an explosive motion. “You’re going to be firing that leg in an explosive manner, so everything is going to be flexed,” says Baldwin of the move. “Quadriceps, hip flexors, and your entire body.”

Step 3

Meet the bat with your lower quad, which should be at around waist level. To ensure proper contact with the bat, place your leg towards the handle, precisely where the bat begins to thicken.

That’s where the action is. Also, attempt to drive the bat into your leg with your right foot. “Make certain that the bat breaks but not your leg,” Baldwin advises with a smile. Joe Wuebben contributed to this article as well.

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The Benefits of Breaking in Your Baseball Bat

Despite their light weight, wooden bats are thick and sturdy pieces of equipment due to their inherent durability. However, it is precisely this resilience that might limit your ability to launch a ball into the air and so reduce your total performance. Understand the advantages of breaking in your baseball bat, as well as how to do it safely and effectively without damaging it. There’s a tight line between making it acceptable for competitive play without compromising its integrity and doing so without compromising its integrity.

The Advantages of Breaking It In

The following are the primary benefits of breaking in a baseball bat.

Performance

A coating of resin is included within the barrel of a baseball bat. This layer helps to keep the bat stable and prevents it from bending. Because of this lack of elasticity, the trampoline effect on your bat is severely limited. With each swing, you have more power since the trampoline effect has increased in intensity. In order to increase the overall trampoline effect, it is necessary to break up this resin coating, which allows the bat to bend more each time it makes contact with the ball.

Longevity

Breaking in your bat has the additional benefit of improving the lifespan of your bat. If players do not break the resin layer in after purchasing the item, it may come apart unevenly during play, which can be frustrating. That unevenness has the potential to render the bat ineffective and lower the efficacy of strikes.

How to Break It In

Manually breaking in a bat can be a time-consuming operation, but it is important in order to improve a player’s overall effectiveness. It will take around 75 to 100 swings of a regulation golf ball off a tee before the break-in process is complete. It is necessary to rotate the bat roughly a quarter-inch after each hit in order to provide comprehensive coverage all across the bat’s surface area. If you don’t, you run the chance of uneven breaking. The next stage is to switch to a pitching machine for practice.

Hit with the bat while rotating it for about 75 to 100 times more than the previous hit count.

The third stage is to repeat the previous step, striking the ball 75 to 100 times at 40 mph, but this time with maximum force.

Don’t Waste Time on Inadequate Bats

Because the bat you use to break in is the same one you use for games, it’s critical that you understand how to choose the proper one from the start. Find one that is both comfortable for you and compliments your playing style and stick with it. It should draw attention to your best assets while remaining proportionate to your size. Knowing the benefits of breaking in a bat and going through the process is pointless if you start with a bat that isn’t suited for your style of play.

The Science Behind Breaking Baseball Bats

San Francisco Giants pitcher John Bowker throws his broken bat to the ground after flying out to left field in the fourth inning of a baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals on Friday, April 18, 2008 in Saint Louis. (Photo courtesy of AP Photo/Tom Gannam. ) When a maple bat’s broken barrel struck Susan Rhodes, 50, in the head while she was sitting four seats behind the visitors’ dugout at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on April 25, she was taken to the hospital. She had no idea what was going to happen.

Bats being broken in baseball games is nothing new, but the Rhodes incident, along with other similar injuries suffered this year by a hitting coach and an umpire, have raised the question of whether America’s pastime has suddenly become a lot more dangerous, and whether the new trend in bat wood is to blame.

  • As a result of Barry Bonds’ preference for maple bats, an increasing number of players are turning to maple, raising the possibility that maple bats are more prone to breaking.
  • Cox, like Rhodes, had no idea what was going on.
  • The meeting was the first of many.
  • The development of the bat There was no debate over whether bat was better in the early days of baseball: while Babe Ruth was hitting home runs, he and every other player was using a hickory bat, and no one else was either.
  • “Hickory was a common wood back then, and it’s still renowned today as a good strong wood,” he added.
  • One of the critiques was that it was a hefty bat, and this was one of them.” In response to the quest for a lighter-weight bat (which would allow for faster swinging and greater batting averages), ash became the wood of choice for big leaguers in the late 19th century.
  • However, because to its lesser weight, ash does not have the same strength as hickory.

“If you want a really strong wood, that is possible, but you will end up with an increase in weight,” Smith stated.

As a result, there is a type of optimal equilibrium.” During the 1990s, maple became increasingly popular as a substitute for hardwoods.

The majority of players, though, continued to use ash bats – at least until Barry Bonds broke the single-season home run record in 2001, when he used a maple bat to do it.

“For more than 50 years, northern white ash served as the primary wood source.

As a result, there was a significant shift “Smith shared his thoughts with LiveScience.

Maple and ash are known to shatter in a variety of ways.

Smith believes that the structure of the pores, which convey moisture inside the trees before they become bats, is responsible for part of the variation in breaking patterns seen.

“If you were to kind of climb inside of the wood, what you’d discover is that there are a whole lot of pores in the grain sections that are responsible for transporting moisture throughout the tree.

Growth planes feature weak sections as a result of the concentration of vacancies in the wood in a few specific locations.

“The barrel would just sort of start to weaken, and you’d have small layers that flaked off,” Smith explained.

“You don’t have the flaking types of failures in maple bats that you did in ash bats,” he explained.

Although ash is susceptible to flaking because to its porous composition, the same structure that channels fractures down its length also allows the crack to expand before it may split the bat in half.

Given the dispersed pores of maple, fractures in the wood can develop in any direction.

“You’re possibly more likely to have bat particles flying through the infield,” Smith said, pointing out that maple doesn’t flake, which would serve as a signal to a player that his bat is breaking.

It is most advantageous for a bat when the grain aligns with the length of the bat.

In Smith’s opinion, “if you have a bat that is not cut straight to the grain, it’s going to be a weaker bat.” “Whether this is the root reason of the maple failures or not, there are a variety of other factors that may be at play, but this could at the very least be a contributing component.” a tremendous amount of force Another element that has more to do with the batter than with the wood is as follows: He had a horrible track record with the ball.

The ball comes into contact with the bat across a small area for only about one thousandth of a second, yet the force of the hit is around 5,000 pounds during that brief contact.

This indicates that the bat is vibrating and bending, which indicates that the ball is in play.

This is precisely where the bat of Colorado Rockies star Todd Helton shattered before the barrel struck Rhodes, the fan.) This brings us to another characteristic of today’s bats that might be contributing to their breakage: their small grips.

Smith blames the shrinking of the handle to the introduction of metal bats, which most players now grew up with and which have narrower handles on the majority of occasions.

Today’s topic of discussion is controversy.

The most recent incidence happened on June 24 during a game between the Colorado Rockies and the Kansas City Royals, when plate umpire Brian O’Nora was struck in the head by a stray bat fragment while working the outfield.

As a result, there is no real evidence that bats are breaking more frequently now than in the past, or that maple breaks more frequently than ash.

He also pointed out that broken ash bats had caused injuries in the past as well.

There have been a lot of suggestions for techniques to lessen the amount of broken bats.

“There’s no doubt that increasing the diameter of the handle will result in a stronger bat,” Smith asserted.

Smith went on to say, “Really, the problem is a part of the game.” In addition, maple bats will most certainly continue to collapse in a more brittle manner than ash bats, since “wood bats fail, and they’ll continue to fail.” Moreover, according to Smith, Major League Baseball might conduct a study of wood kinds and impose limits on species that break in a more brittle manner, or it may establish requirements for the grain alignment of bats in order to make them less prone to shatter.

Alternatively, extra protective netting might be installed in front of lower-level infield seats in stadiums, which would provide greater protection to supporters (Detroit Tigers center fielder Curtis Granderson suggested this option in his ESPN.com blog, since fans are the primary concern for injuries because it is easier for players to dodge errant shards).

Despite Smith’s agreement that it would make fans safer, he adds, “You then have to stare through that dumb net in order to enjoy the game.”

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Currently, Andrea Thompson works as an associate editor at Scientific American, where she covers topics such as sustainability, energy, and the environment, among other things. Prior to that, she worked as a senior writer for Climate Central, where she covered climate science, and as a reporter and editor for Live Science, where she largely covered Earth science and the environment. A graduate degree in science, health, and environmental reporting from New York University, as well as a bachelor’s degree in atmospheric chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in atmospheric chemistry from the same institution.

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