What Is Tb In Baseball Stats

Total bases – Wikipedia

Total bases are the amount of bases a player has acquired as a result of his or her hits in baseball statistics. It is a weighted total in which the weight value for a single is 1, a double is 2, a triple is 3, and a home run is 4. Example: Three singles equal three total bases; a double plus a home run equal six total bases; three triples equal nine total bases Only bases gained as a result of hits are included toward this total. It is not possible to raise a player’s total number of bases by reaching base by other methods (for example, by reaching base on balls) or by moving forward after the hit (for example, by getting a hit from a subsequent hitter).

The slugging percentage of a player is calculated by dividing the total number of bases scored by the total number of at bats.

Records

Both Hank Aaron (left) and Babe Ruth (right) maintain the Major League Baseball records for total bases in a career and in a single season, with 6,856 and 457 runs respectively. Hank Aaron holds the all-time Major League Baseball record for total bases with 6,856 in his career. Because he has spent the most of his professional baseball career in the National League, he also owns the record for most total bases in that league with 6,591. Aaron has a total of 300 or more total bases in 15 separate seasons, which is a record.

  • In the American League, Ty Cobb’s total of 5,854 bases is the all-time high.
  • Babe Ruth holds the single-season MLB and American League hits marks with 457 total bases in the 1921 season.
  • In a single game, Shawn Green had 19 total bases, which is a single-game record.
  • Josh Hamilton of the Texas Rangers set the American League record most home runs and doubles in a game against the Baltimore Orioles on May 8, 2012, when he hit four home missiles and added a double (18 total bases).
  • During a game against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on June 24, 2010, Pedroia went 3-for-3 with three home runs, one single, and a double for the Boston Red Sox.
  • As a result of their 60 total bases, the Red Sox set the record for the most total bases scored by a club in a single game on June 8, 1950, when they defeated the St.
  • Among big league pitchers, Phil Niekrog surrendered the most total bases in a lifetime (7,473), while Robin Roberts (555 total bases surrendered in 19556) set the single-season record with 555 total bases surrendered.

Allan Travers of the Detroit Tigers holds the record for the most total bases allowed by a single pitcher in a single game with 42, set in 1989.

Postseason

In a postseason game, two players have combined to bat for a total of 14 bases. This feat has only been accomplished once in the World Series, by Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 of the 2011 World Series, when he hit two singles and three home runs in a single at-bat. Robertson accomplished the same feat when playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates in Game 2 of the 1971 National League Championship Series, hitting a double and three home runs in the process, according to Baseball Reference.

Louis Cardinals, but Derek Jeter has the lifetime postseason record with 302 total bases, which he has amassed throughout his time with the New York Yankees.

The Atlanta Braves collected 34 total bases in Game 5 of the 1991 World Series, defeating the Minnesota Twins by a score of 14–5.

All-Star Games

While representing the American League in the 1946 edition of the All-Star Game, Ted Williams hit for a record 10 total bases (two singles and two home runs), setting a new record. There have been a total of 52 total bases scored in a single All-Star Game, the most recent being the 1954 edition, when the American League had 29 players and the National League had 23. The American League has amassed the most total bases by a single team in an All-Star Game twice, in 1954 and 1992, when they defeated the National League.

References

  1. Team Batting Game Finder: From 1988 to 2018, playing for SFG, (requiring TB =40), ranked by highest total base hit (TB)
  2. “Giants 13, Braves 4”. Baseball Reference. Retrieved August 24, 2018. “Career LeadersRecords for Total Bases”. Baseball Reference. RetrievedJuly 8,2018
  3. “Batting SeasonCareer Finder: Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, Playing in the National League, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB =5500), sorted by greatest Total Bases”. Baseball Reference. RetrievedJuly 8,2018
  4. “Batting SeasonCareer Finder: For Single Seasons, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB =300), Lonnie Wheeler and Henry Aaron are two of the most well-known names in the world of sports (2014). I had a hammer at my disposal (2 ed.). On page 202 of Harper-Collins’ book, “Batting SeasonCareer Finder: Spanning Multiple Seasons or entire Careers, Playing in the American League, From 1871 to 2018, (requiring TB =5500), sorted by greatest Total Bases”, Baseball Reference. RetrievedJuly 8,2018
  5. “Active LeadersRecords for Total Bases”. Baseball-Reference.com. RetrievedApril 16,2020
  6. “Career LeadersRecords for Total Bases Baseball for Statheads. From 1871 to 2018, (requires TB =6000), Stats only available back to 1908 and some incomplete., sorted by greatest Total Bases”. Baseball Reference. RetrievedJuly 9,2018
  7. “Team Batting Game Finder: From 1908 to 2018, (require TB =50), sorted by greatest Total Bases”. Baseball Reference. RetrievedJuly 9,2018
  8. “Pitching SeasonCareer Finder: For Single Seasons, From 1871 to 2018, (require “Pittsburgh Pirates 9, San Francisco Giants 4” was the result of the game on April 16, 2020. Retrosheet from the 3rd of October, 1971. The American League defeated the National League 2-0 on April 16, 2020. “All-Time and Single-Season Postseason Batting Leaders”. Baseball Reference. RetrievedAugust 27, 2018
  9. “Team Batting Game Finder: In the Postseason, From 1903 to 2017, (requiring TB =32), sorted by greatest TB”. Baseball Reference. RetrievedJuly 9, 2018
  10. “Team Batting Game Finder: In the All-Star Game, From 1933 to 2017, (requiring TB =8), sorted by

External links

Total bases (TB) are the number of bases a player has acquired as a result of hits in baseball statistics. It is a weighted total in which the weight value for a single is 1, a double is 2, a triple is 3, and a home run is 4. Only bases gained as a result of hits are included toward this total. It is not possible to raise a player’s total number of bases by reaching base by other methods (for example, by reaching base on balls) or by moving forward after the hit (for example, by getting a hit from a subsequent hitter).

Hank Aaron has 6,856 total bases in his career, making him the all-time leader.

Key

Rank Rank amongst leaders in career total bases. A blank field indicates a tie.
Player (2021 TBs) Number of total bases during the2021 Major League Baseball season
TB Total career total bases
* Denotes elected toNational Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bold Denotes active player.

List

Albert Pujols, the active leader in career total bases and the fourth-best player in baseball history,

Rank Player (2021 TBs) TB
1 Hank Aaron* 6,856
2 Stan Musial* 6,134
3 Willie Mays* 6,080
4 Albert Pujols(119) 6,042
5 Barry Bonds 5,976
6 Ty Cobb* 5,854
7 Alex Rodriguez 5,813
8 Babe Ruth* 5,793
9 Pete Rose 5,752
10 Carl Yastrzemski* 5,539
11 Eddie Murray* 5,397
12 Rafael Palmeiro 5,388
13 Frank Robinson* 5,373
14 Adrián Beltré 5,309
15 Ken Griffey, Jr.* 5,271
16 Dave Winfield* 5,221
17 Cal Ripken, Jr.* 5,168
18 Miguel Cabrera(182) 5,124
19 Tris Speaker* 5,101
20 Lou Gehrig* 5,060
21 George Brett* 5,044
22 Mel Ott* 5,041
23 Jimmie Foxx* 4,956
24 Derek Jeter* 4,921
25 Ted Williams* 4,884
26 Honus Wagner* 4,870
27 Paul Molitor* 4,854
28 Al Kaline* 4,852
29 Reggie Jackson* 4,834
30 Manny Ramírez 4,826
31 Andre Dawson* 4,787
32 David Ortiz* 4,765
33 Chipper Jones* 4,755
34 Carlos Beltrán 4,751
35 Gary Sheffield 4,737
36 Robin Yount* 4,730
37 Rogers Hornsby* 4,712
38 Craig Biggio* 4,711
39 Ernie Banks* 4,706
40 Sammy Sosa 4,704
41 Al Simmons* 4,685
42 Jim Thome* 4,667
43 Harold Baines* 4,604
44 Billy Williams* 4,599
45 Cap Anson* 4,592
46 Rickey Henderson* 4,588
47 Frank Thomas* 4,550
48 Tony Pérez* 4,532
49 Mickey Mantle* 4,511
50 Vladimir Guerrero* 4,506
Rank Player (2021 TBs) TB
51 Roberto Clemente* 4,492
52 Paul Waner* 4,478
53 Nap Lajoie* 4,472
54 Fred McGriff 4,458
55 Iván Rodríguez* 4,451
56 Dave Parker 4,405
57 Mike Schmidt* 4,404
58 Luis Gonzalez 4,385
59 Eddie Mathews* 4,349
60 Sam Crawford* 4,328
61 Goose Goslin* 4,325
62 Todd Helton 4,292
63 Brooks Robinson* 4,270
64 Eddie Collins* 4,268
65 Vada Pinson 4,264
66 Robinson Cano(0) 4,263
67 Tony Gwynn* 4,259
68 Charlie Gehringer* 4,257
69 Jeff Kent 4,246
70 Lou Brock* 4,238
71 Dwight Evans 4,230
72 Willie McCovey* 4,219
73 Johnny Damon 4,214
74 Jeff Bagwell* 4,213
75 Willie Stargell* 4,190
76 Rusty Staub 4,185
77 Jake Beckley* 4,160
78 Steve Finley 4,157
79 Harmon Killebrew* 4,143
80 Jim Rice* 4,129
81 Zack Wheat* 4,100
82 Torii Hunter 4,087
83 Paul Konerko 4,083
Al Oliver 4,083
85 Wade Boggs* 4,064
86 Harry Heilmann* 4,053
87 Andrés Galarraga 4,038
88 Bobby Abreu 4,026
89 Roberto Alomar* 4,018
90 Aramis Ramírez 4,004
91 Carlton Fisk* 3,999
92 Rod Carew* 3,998
93 Ichiro Suzuki 3,994
94 Garret Anderson 3,984
95 Carlos Delgado 3,976
96 Joe Morgan* 3,962
97 Orlando Cepeda* 3,959
98 Sam Rice* 3,955
99 Joe DiMaggio* 3,948
100 Steve Garvey 3,941

Notes

  1. Inactive players include those who have declared their retirement or who have not participated in a complete season of competition

External links

  • Record holders in the field of baseball (Baseball Reference – Career Leaders)

Total bases

When it comes to baseball statistics, total bases refers to the amount of bases a player has acquired through hits, which is the sum of his or her hits weighted by 1 for a single, 2 for a double, 3 for a triple, and 4 for a home run. Total bases are calculated as follows: For the purposes of this total, only bases gained through hits are considered.

With the help of the formula, it is possible to compute total bases from regularly used baseball statistics. Singles (1B) may be expressed as, which, when paired with the TB formula provided, enables for the simplified formula listed at the top of the page to be calculated.

Leaders

All-Time Total Bases Leaders(through games ofSeptember 30, 2008) Active players inbold.
Rank Player Name Total Bases
1 Hank Aaron 6,856
2 Stan Musial 6,134
3 Willie Mays 6,066
4 Barry Bonds 5,976
5 Ty Cobb 5,854
6 Babe Ruth 5,793
7 Pete Rose 5,752
8 Carl Yastrzemski 5,539
9 Eddie Murray 5,397
10 Rafael Palmeiro 5,388
11 Frank Robinson 5,373
12 Dave Winfield 5,221
13 Cal Ripken, Jr. 5,168
14 Tris Speaker 5,101
15 Ken Griffey, Jr. 5,092
16 Lou Gehrig 5,060
17 George Brett 5,044
18 Mel Ott 5,041
19 Jimmie Foxx 4,956
20 Ted Williams 4,884
21 Honus Wagner 4,862
22 Paul Molitor 4,854
23 Al Kaline 4,852
24 Reggie Jackson 4,834
25 Andre Dawson 4,787
26 Robin Yount 4,730
27 Rogers Hornsby 4,712
28 Craig Biggio 4,711
29 Ernie Banks 4,706
30 Sammy Sosa 4,704
31 Al Simmons 4,685
32 Gary Sheffield 4,616
33 Harold Baines 4,604
34 Billy Williams 4,599
35 Rickey Henderson 4,588
36 Cap Anson 4,574
37 Frank Thomas 4,550
38 Alex Rodriguez 4,543
39 Tony Perez 4,532
40 Manny Ramírez 4,516
41 Mickey Mantle 4,511
42 Roberto Clemente 4,492
43 Paul Waner 4,478
44 Nap Lajoie 4,474
45 Fred McGriff 4,458
46 Dave Parker 4,405
47 Mike Schmidt 4,404
48 Luis Gonzalez 4,385
49 Eddie Mathews 4,349
50 Sam Crawford 4,328
51 Goose Goslin 4,325
52 Brooks Robinson 4,270
53 Eddie Collins 4,268
54 Vada Pinson 4,264
55 Tony Gwynn 4,259
56 Charlie Gehringer 4,257
57 Jeff Kent 4,246
58 Lou Brock 4,238
59 Darrell Evans 4,230
60 Willie McCovey 4,219
61 Jeff Bagwell 4,213
62 Willie Stargell 4,190
63 Rusty Staub 4,185
64 Steve Finley 4,157
65 Jake Beckley 4,150
66 Harmon Killebrew 4,143
67 Jim Rice 4,129
68 Jim Thome 4,116
69 Iván Rodríguez 4,110
70 Zach Wheat 4,100
71 Al Oliver 4,083
72 Wade Boggs 4,064
73 Harry Heilmann 4,053
74 Andrés Galarraga 4,038
75 Chipper Jones 4,020
76 Roberto Alomar 4,018
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Closest active players to 4,000 Total bases

  • Baseball statistics
  • List of the top 500 Major League Baseball home run hitters
  • List of the top 500 Major League Baseball home run hitters The following is a list of all-time home run leaders throughout history. Home run champions in Major League Baseball are listed below. The 500-home-run club Baseball players who have 3000 hits and 500 home runs in Major League Baseball are listed below. List of Major League Baseball players who have 3000 hits and 300 home runs
  • MLB players who have 2,000 hits
  • MLB players who have 400 doubles
  • MLB players who have 100 triples
  • MLB players who have 1,000 runs
  • MLB players who have 1,000 RBI
  • MLB players who have 300 stolen bases
  • MLB players who have 3000 hits and 300 home runs
  • MLB players who have 100 triples a ranking of the top 100 MLB players in terms of base on balls (walks)
  • Top 15 in strikeouts, as well as a list of active Major League Baseball players who rank in the Top 50
  • The following is a list of Major League Baseball players with a batting average of.325 or higher: List of Major League Baseball players who have an on-base percentage of.400 or higher
  • The following is a list of Major League Baseball players who have a slugging percentage of.500 or higher: List of Major League Baseball players with an on-base plus slugging percentage of.900 or higher: a list of Major League Baseball’s all-time leaders in games started and finished
  • A list of Major League Baseball’s all-time leaders in career wins
  • The 300-win club
  • The top 100 Major League Baseball strikeout pitchers
  • The 3000 strikeout club
  • A list of the 300-save club and the Blown saves
  • And a list of the 300-save club and the Blown saves. List of the most successful saves in Major League Baseball history

Other

  • Baseball.reference.com – Career LeadersRecords for Total Bases
  • ESPN’s MLB Statistics Glossary
  • Baseball.reference.com – Career LeadersRecords for Total Bases

Total Bases (TB) (Baseball) – Captain Calculator

TBis the total number of bases a hitter has amassed while at the plate. There are no complicated calculations involved; each base hit has the same weight as the previous one – a single base hit adds one to the total, a double base hit adds three to the total, and so on. However, it does not take into consideration bases acquired in other methods (such as walks or hit by pitch).

Formula – How to calculateTB

TB = 1 base hit plus (2 x 2 base hits) + (3 x 3 base hits) + (4 x 4 base hits) + (4 x home runs)

Example

If a hitter has 75 one-base hits, 38 two-base hits, 7 three-base hits, and 13 home runs, then the following is true: TB = 75 + (38 x 2) + (7 x 3) + (38 x 2) + (38 x 3) (13 x 4) A total of 224TB is equal to 75 + 76 + 21 + 52TB. This hitter has amassed 224 bases on hits over his career.

Sources and more resources

  • Wikipedia –List of Major League Baseball players who have amassed a total of 4,000 base hits
  • Baseball-reference.com –all-time career leaders and all-time records in total bases
  • Baseball rules and baseball statistics from Major League Baseball, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Baseball), the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Softball), the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Baseball and Softball), the National Federation of High Schools (NFHS), and the International Baseball Federation

Offensive Baseball Stats Glossary

Since the late 1800s, measuring offense has been one of the most widely used sets of statistics, with batting averages appearing in newspapers as far back as the late 1800s. The formulae, explanations, and statistics that follow will give you with an overview of the most popular and less common elements that are currently utilized to quantify offense.

Offensive Stats 101

Formulas / Definitions / Examples
Adjusted Production
(On Base Percentage divided by League OBP) + (Slugging Average divided by League SA) -1The adjusted production statistic is a park and league adjusted version of on base plus slugging percentage. It is specifically used and created by Total Baseball for comparison of players from different eras in different parks. This is an advanced statistic which requires the complete understanding of on base percentage, slugging average and a park adjustment factor. Total Baseball has adjusted OBP and SA for the player’s home park and League OBP and League SA are the league average for each statistic respectively. As in OPS, the decimal point is dropped when APRO in seen or used.
Batting Average or
Number of Hits (divided by) Number of At BatsEasily the most common statistic in baseball and the most understood – even outside of the game. It has been historically used as the benchmark for hitters since the late 1800’s making it historically rich, easy to understand, easy to compute and almost everyone knows what a.300 hitter is. One of the only disadvantages is the batting average statistic does not take into account walks or extra-base hits.
Base On Balls Percentage
Number of Total Walks (divided by) Number of Plate AppearancesAnother common statistic in baseball and also quite easy to understand and easy to compute. The primary purpose for this offensive measurement is to gauge the percentage of a batter’s appearance at the plate that directly result in the player being walked. Newer than batting average but nice to use and understand for determining hitters that are “perhaps” more respected or simply have a better “eye.”
Home Run Ratio
Number of Home Runs Hit (divided by) Number of At BatsAnother common statistic in baseball and also quite easy to understand and easy to compute. The primary purpose for this offensive measurement is to gauge the percentage of a batter’s at bats that directly result in the player hitting a home run. Newer than batting average but nice to use and understand for determining hitters that are more apt to hit home runs more often than others.
Isolated Power
Total Bases – Hits (divided by) At BatsIsolated Power, or extra-bases per at bats, was also invented by Branch Rickey and All Roth during the 1950’s. On Base Percentage measured for the manager how often a player reaches base while the isolated power showed them how often those bases reached were extra base hits – beyond a single. The total bases here was calculated by awarding 0 for a single, 1 for a double, 2 for a triple and 3 for a home run.
Major League Equivalency
Secret FormulaThis is a “secret” formula used and developed exclusive by Bill James of STATS, Inc. which is used to determine what a Minor League player would have hit had he been a player in the Major Leagues. It is not used as a tool for future predictions but rather determines the player’s level of performance in the past and adjusts for the difficulty level in the big leagues to estimate performance on a current Major League roster.
On Base Percentage
(Hits + Walks + Hit-By-Pitch) divided by (At Bats + Walks+ Hit-By-Pitch + Sac Flys)The On Base Percentage statistic was originally created by Branch Rickey and Allan Roth in the 1950’s as a means to measure the percentage of times a player reaches any base. It did not originally include the sacrifice fly denomination but when it was officially adapted in 1984 it appeared using the formula written above. It is easily one of the most important statistics and it is specifically written with managers in mind.
On Base Plus Slugging
On Base Percentage + Slugging AverageThis is not a true statistic by definition but it is often used as an index for rating an overall player’s performance and production versus his fellow players. The formula above requires the use and understanding of two others, also on this page, and when seen in text appears without the decimal point.
Plate Appearances
At-Bats + Bases on Balls + Hit By Pitcher + Sacrifice Hits + Sacrifice Flies + Times Reached on Defensive InterferencePlate appearances have long sparked controversy as it is a factor used to determine the yearly batting champion. Currently, 3.1 plate appearances per game are required for batting title eligibility.
Runs Created
On Base Percentage x Total BasesThis statistic was originally created by Bill James to measure a player’s total offensive production. By combining the two statistical (OBP and TB which are listed on this page) results you can determine that desired production. Bill James describes it by saying scoring runs consists of two actions: First – getting on base or creating baserunners (which is on base percentage) and Second – the advancing of those runners around the bases (which is total bases). A superb stat that creates a great index for offensive ratings.
Runs Created Per 25
Runs Created (divided by) Number of Outs x 25This statistic was also created by Bill James and uses the results of the runs created formula listed above. You then divide by the number of outs the player actually made and multiply it by 25. The figure is an estimate of how many runs a team made of
Slugging Average
Number of (Singles +++) divided by At BatsA players Slugging Average, or Slugging Percentage, is directly defined as total bases per at-bat. To calculate a player’s total bases you award a 1 for a single, a 2 for a double, a 3 for a triple, and a 4 for a home run then add them all together. Divide that by the total number of at bats a player has and you can easily determine the overall number of bases a player generally touches during his at bats.
Strikeout Ratio
Number of Strikeouts (divided by) Number of At BatsAnother common statistic in baseball and also quite easy to understand and easy to compute. The primary purpose for this offensive measurement is to gauge the percentage of a batter’s at bats that directly result in the player striking out. Not one of the nicest hitting statistics to lead the league in each year.
Stolen Base Percentage
Number of Successful Stolen Bases (divided by) Number of Stolen Base AttemptsAnother common statistic in baseball and also quite easy to understand and easy to compute. The primary purpose for this offensive measurement is to gauge the percentage of a base runners attempted steals that directly result in the player successfully stealing the base.
Stolen Base Runs
(.3 x Stolen Bases) – (.6 x Caught Stealing)This is another very goodTotal Baseballstatistic aimed at quantifying base-stealing. Numerous statistical studies done byTotal Baseballhave shown that the break even success rate for steals (the rate at which an attempt to steal is neither helping nor hurting the team in terms of total runs scored) is about 67%. Each successful steal adds approximately.3 runs to a team’s total runs scored which is much less than often believed. Therefore, the statistic is meant to estimate the impact of base-stealers, which, other than the elite base-stealers, rarely amounts to more than a few runs per year for each team.
Total Base Percentage
(Hits + Walks + Hit-By-Pitch) divided by (At Bats + Walks+ Hit-By-Pitch)This statistic is no longer used as a newer / improved version was adopted in 1984 byMajor League Baseballand listed above – See On Base Percentage. This worked the in the same respect however it failed to account for a player’s sacrifice flys hit during a game.
Total Bases
Number of (Singles +++)When calculating batting average, every hit simply counts as one. Total bases places a “weight” on each base hit and according toThe Baseball Dictionary”computes his worth as a batter.”
Offensive Stats 101
See also:  How Much Do Baseball Scouts Make

You may not have known that the first time the batting average statistic appeared in print was during the 1874 season, two years before the debut season of the National League. The majority of baseball fans are aware that Babe Ruth has the greatest lifetime slugging average, but do you know who comes in second (click here for the top one-hundred players)? Branch Rickey and Allen Roth (a statistician with the Brooklyn Dodgers in the early 1950s) came up with the formula for on-base percentage when they were working together.

Baseball Abbreviations

Tony Gwynn had another outstanding season in 1997, with 592 at-bats and 220 strikeouts, and an avg of.372, which was the best in the National League. Which of these abbreviations do all of these letters stand for? The Baseball Almanac is glad to give a standard collection of acronyms that are seen and used in print on a regular basis in the sport of baseball.

Baseball Stats

Baseball Abbreviations 101
Offensive Abbreviations for Statistics
ABBBAVGCS2BGIDP GRSLHBPHHRRHRIBBISO LOB OBPOPSRRBISFSHSSLGSB%SBRSBSOTB3B At BatsBases on Balls (Walks)Batting AverageCaught StealingDoublesGround into Double Plays Grand SlamsHit by PitchHitsHome Run RatioHome RunsIntentionalBasesonBalls(Walks)Isolated Power Left on Base On-Base PercentageOn-Base Plus SluggingRunsRuns Batted InSacrifice FliesSacrifice Hits (Bunts)SinglesSlugging PercentageStolen Base PercentageStolen Base RunsStolen BasesStrikeoutsTotal BasesTriples
Pitching Abbreviations for Statistics
AOBB BFPBKCBOCGCGLERERAGFGOGOAOGPGSHHBPHRIBBIPIRAIPSLMB9OBAPARRPFRWS/SHOSOSVSVOTBWWP Fly Outs (Air)Walks (Bases on Balls) Batters Facing PitcherBalksCombined ShutoutComplete GamesComplete Game LossesEarned RunsEarned Run AverageGames FinishedGround OutsGround Outs / Fly Outs RatioGames PlayedGames StartedHitsHit BattersHome RunsIntentional WalksInnings PitchedInherited Runs AllowedInnings Per StartLossesBaserunners Per 9 InningsOpponents’ Batting AveragePlate AppearancesRunsRelief FailuresRelief WinsShutoutsStrikeoutsSavesSave OpportunitiesTotal BasesWinsWild Pitches
Defensive Abbreviations for Statistics
ACSDPEGPOFAPBPKPOSBTCTP AssistsCaught StealingDouble PlaysErrorsGames PlayedOutfield AssistsPassed BallsPickoffsPutoutsStolen Bases Total ChancesTriple Plays
Miscellaneous Abbreviations for Statistics
ML SER Major League Service
Baseball Stats Abbreviations 101

The “common” set has several variations (DO Doubles, TR Triples, etc.), but these are the ones that are regarded “official” and are the ones that are used here at Baseball Almanac, among other places. Did you know that the National Association (a non-official league that gave rise to the National Leagueofficial )’s statistics were destroyed in a fire in the early 1900’s? Major League Baseball organized a Special Baseball Records Committee in the 1960s to examine the irregular records that had been kept previous to the 1920 season.

CEB Abbreviations

ANALYSIS STATISTICS
Avg against left-handed pitchers
Avg against right-handed pitchers
Avg whenleading off an inning
Avg whenbatting with 2 outs
Avg whenbatting with runners on base
Avg whenbatting with bases empty
Avg whenbatting with runners on 2nd or 3rd base
Number of groundouts (includes SACs, but not errors)
Number of fly outs(incudes SFs, but not errors)
Fly outs to groundouts ratio
Avg as pinch hitter
with runners in scoring pos Avg whenbatting with runners in scoring positions
w/rnr on 3rd and LT 2 outs Avg whenbatting with runner on third base and less than 2 outs
Avg whenbatting with 2 outs
Runs batted in with 2 outs
Success advancing runners
Number of timesbatter made an out and advanced at least 1 runner
Number of runnersleft on base by last batter of inning
Reach first base on error
Reach first base on fielder’s choice
Strikeouts look

STATS Hosted Solution

Definitions of Baseball Terms % Inherited Scored A Relief Pitching statistic indicating the percentage of runners on base at the time a relief pitcher enters a game that he allows to score. 1st Batter OBP The On-Base Percentage allowed by a relief pitcher to the first batter he faces in a game. Active Career Batting Leaders Minimum of 1,000 At Bats required for Batting Average, On-Base Percentage, Slugging Percentage, At Bats Per HR, At Bats Per GDP, At Bats Per RBI, and K/BB Ratio.

One hundred (100) Stolen Base Attempts required for Stolen Base Success %.

Two hundred fifty (250) Games Started required for Complete Game Frequency.

Any player who appeared in 1995 is eligible for inclusion provided he meets the category’s minimum requirements. BA ScPos Allowed Batting Average Allowed with Runners in Scoring Position. Baserunners per Nine Innings These are the hits, walks and hit batsmen allowed per nine innings. Bases Loaded This category shows a player’s batting average in bases loaded situation. Batting Average Hits divided by At Bats. Bequeathed Runners Any runner(s) on base when a pitcher leaves a game are considered bequeathed to the departing hurler; the opposite of inherited runners (see below). Blown Saves This is charged any time a pitcher comes into a game where a save situation is in place and he loses the lead. Catcher’s ERA The Earned Run Average of a club’s pitchers with a particular catcher behind the plate.

To figure this for a catcher, multiply the Earned Runs Allowed by the pitchers while he was catching times nine and divide that by his number of Innings Caught. Cheap Wins/Tough Losses/Top Game Scores First determine the starting pitcher’s Game Score as follows:

  1. Start with a number of 50
  2. The starting pitcher gets one point for every strikeout he records
  3. After the fourth inning, add 2 points for each additional inning the pitcher goes on to complete. For each strikeout, add one point to your total. For each hit that is permitted, deduct two points. For each earned run that is permitted, subtract 4 points. Add 2 points to account for an unearned run. For each stroll, deduct one point from your total.

If the starting pitcher scores over 50 and loses, it’s a Tough Loss. If he wins with a game score under 50, it’s a Cheap Win. Cleanup Slugging% The Slugging Percentage of a player when batting fourth in the batting order. Clutch This category shows a player’s batting average in the late innings of close games: the seventh inning or later with the batting team ahead by one, tied, or has the tying run on base, at bat or on deck. Complete Game Frequency Complete Games divided by Games Started. Defensive Batting Average A composite statistic incorporating various defensive statistics to arrive at a number akin to batting average.

The formula uses standard deviations to establish a spread from best to worst. Earned Run Average (Earned Runs times 9) divided by Innings Pitched. Fast-A Otherwise known as “Advanced A,” these A-level minor leagues are the California League, Carolina League and Florida Stat League. Favorite Toy The Favorite Toy is a method that is used to estimate a player’s chance of getting to a specific goal in the following example, we’ll say 3,000 hits.Four things are considered:

  1. Needed Hits – the number of hits required to get the desired result. (Of course, this could also be “Need Home Runs” or “Need Doubles” – whatever you choose to call it.)
  2. Years Remaining in the Contract. The formula 24-.6 is used to estimate the number of years that will be required to achieve the target (age). As a result of this approach, players under the age of 20 have 12.0 seasons left on their contract. Players under the age of 25 have nine seasons left on their contract, players under 30 have 6.0 seasons left on their contract, and players over 35 have just three season left on their contract. Any athlete who is currently actively participating in competitive sports is presumed to have at least 1.5 seasons left, regardless of his or her age. Hit Level has been established. For 1996, the established hit level would be calculated by multiplying 1993 hits by two times 1994 hits by three times 1995 hits by six, and then dividing the result by six. In order to be eligible, a player must have an established performance level that is more than three-fourths of his or her most recent performance level—for example, a player who had 200 hits in 1995 cannot have an established hit level lower than 150 hits. Hits that are expected to be made in the future. This is calculated by multiplying the second number (the number of ears left) by the third number (the established hit level)

Once you have obtained the projected remaining hits, the probability of achieving the objective is calculated as (projected remaining hits) divided by (require hits), minus.5. If your “require hits” and your “projected remaining hits” are the same, you have a 50 percent probability of achieving your target using this technique of calculation. If your anticipated remaining hits are 20 percent greater than your required hits, you have a 70 percent probability of achieving your target in time. There are two specific rules, as well as a note:

  1. The probability of a player continuing to develop toward a goal cannot be more than.97 per year. For example, a player cannot calculate that they have a 148 percent probability of completing their goal because this is against the rules.)
  2. The possibility of a player continuing to develop toward the objective cannot be more than.75 each season if his offensive winning percentage is below.500 throughout the season. If a below-average batter is two years away from attaining a goal, his likelihood of accomplishing that objective cannot be proved to be better than nine-sixteenths of a percent, or three-fourths times three-fourths, no of his age.
  3. Rather of using actual figures from a complete season of play, we utilized predicted metrics for 1994 and 1995.
Fielding Percentage (Putouts plus Assists) divided by (Putouts plus Assists plus Errors). First Batter Efficiency This statistic tells you the batting average allowed by a relief pitcher to the first batter he faces. GDP per GDP Situation A GDP situation exists any time there is a man on first with less than two outs. This statistic measures how often a player grounds into a double play in that situation. Go-Ahead RBI Any time a player drives in a run which gives his team the lead, he is credited with a go-ahead RBI. Ground/Fly Ratio (Grd/Fly) Simply a hitter’s ground balls divided by his fly balls.

  1. During the seventh inning or later, the batting side is either up by one run, tied, or has a possible tying run on base, at the plate, or on deck
  2. The game is over

Note: this situation is very similar to the characteristics of a Save Situation. Leadoff On Base% The On-Base Percentage of a player when batting first in the batting order. No Decision (ND) The result when a starter is credited with neither a win nor a loss. OBP+SLUG (OPS) On-base percentage plus slugging percentage. Offensive Winning Percentage (OWP) The Winning Percentage a team of nine Fred McGriffs (or anybody) would compile against average pitching and defense.

The formula: (Runs Created per 27 outs) divided by the League average of runs scored per game.

“Hold Percentage” is computed by dividing extra bases taken (by baserunners) by the number of opportunities.

Note: such plays are often referred to as pickoffs, but appear in official records as Caught Stealings.

Pickoff (fielding play 1-3 being the most common) is not an official statistic. Percentage of Pitches Taken This tells you how often a player lets a pitch go by without swinging. Percentage of Swings Put In Play This tells you how often a player hits the ball into fair territory, or is retired on a foul-ball out, when he swings. Pickoffs (Pk) The number of times a runner was picked off base by a pitcher. Pivot Percentage The number of double plays turned by a second baseman as the pivot man, divided by the number of opportunities. PkOf Throw/Runner The number of pickoff throws made by a pitcher divided by the number of runners on first base. Plate Appearances At Bats plus Total Walks plus Hit By Pitcher plus Sacrifice Hits plus Sacrifice Flies plus Times Reached on Defensive Interference. Power/Speed Number A way to look at power and speed in one number.

A player must score high in both areas to earn a high Power/Speed Number.The formula: (HR x SB x 2) divided by (HR + SB). Quality Start Any start in which a pitcher works six or more innings while allowing three or fewer earned runs. Quick Hooks and Slow Hooks A Quick Hook is the removal of a pitcher who has pitched less than 6 innings and given up 3 runs or less.

A Slow Hook occurs when a pitcher pitches more than 9 innings, or allows 7 or more runs, or whose combined innings pitched and runs allowed totals 13 or more. Range Factor The number of Chances (Putouts plus Assists) times nine divided by the number of Defensive Innings Played.

The average for a Regular Player at each position in 1997:

  • 5.00 points for second base, 2.67 points for third base, 4.56 points for shortstop, and 1.99 points for left field, 2.55 points for center field, and 2.06 points for right field.
Relief Points (Pts) Wins plus saves minus losses Run Support Per 9 IP The number of runs scored by a pitcher’s team while he was still in the game times nine divided by his Innings Pitched. Runs Created A way to combine a batter’s total offensive contributions into one number. The formula:(H + BB + HBP – CS – GIDP) times (Total Bases +.26(TBB – IBB + HBP) +.52(SH + SF + SB)) divided by (AB + TBB + HBP + SH + SF). Runs/Times on Base This is calculated by dividing Runs Scored by Times on Base Save Percentage Saves (SV) divided by Save Opportunities (OP). Save Situation A Relief Pitcher is in a Save Situation when upon entering the game with his club leading, he has the opportunity to be the finishing pitcher (and is not the winning pitcher of record at the time), and meets any one of the three following conditions:

  1. He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and has the opportunity to pitch for at least one inning, or he enters the game with the potential tying run on base, at bat, or on deck, regardless of the count, or he pitches three or more innings regardless of the lead and the official scorer awards him a save
  2. Or he pitches three or more innings regardless of the lead and the official scorer awards him a save
SBA Stolen-base attempts against a catcher SB Success% Stolen Bases divided by (Stolen Bases plus Caught Stealing). Secondary Average A way to look at a player’s extra bases gained, independent of Batting Average. The formula:(Total Bases – Hits + TBB + SB) divided by At Bats. Slow-A Otherwise known as “Regular A,” these full-season minor leagues contain less-experienced professional players.

Slugging Percentage Total Bases divided by At Bats. Stolen Base Percentage Allowed This figure indicates how successful opposing baserunners are when attempting a stolen base.

Formulas and Definitions PA AB + BB + HBP + SF + SH + defensive interference PA* AB + BB + HBP + SF Total Bases AVG H/AB OBP (H + BB = HBP)/(AB + BB + HBP + SF) SLG TB/AB Breakdown Categories Ahead/Behind in Count For hitters, ahead in count includes 1-0, 2-0, 3-0, 2-1 and 3-1.

Behind in count for hitters includes 0-1, 0-2, 1-2 and 2-2.

Therefore, a game at 5:30 in Yankee Stadium is a day game while one in Shea Stadium at the same time is a night game.

Turf is artificial turf. Groundball/Flyball Ratio A hitter’s stats against pitchers that induce mostly grounders or flies, respectively.

If it is greater than 1.50, he is a Groundball hitter.

Same cutoffs apply for classifying pitchers.

  • For a batter to be considered a “Hits Best Against” candidate, there must be at least 10 plate appearances between him and the pitcher
  • And for a pitcher to be considered a “Pitches Best Against” candidate, the batter must have a.300 batting average against the pitcher, and the pitcher must limit the batting average of the batter to under.250.

Thus, not all hitters will have five pitchers that qualify and not all pitchers will have five batters who qualify. Scoring Position At least one runner must be at either second or third base. Vs. 1st Batr (Relief) Describes what happened to the first batter a reliever faces.

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