Who Has The Best Era In Baseball

2021 MLB Stat Leaders

Batting Leaders Across the Board in Major League Baseball

BATTING AVERAGE AVG
1WSH/LAD .328
2OAK/CHC .326
3HOU .319
4WSH .313
5HOU .311
Complete Leaders
Home Runs HR
1KC 48
1TOR 48
3LAA 46
4TOR 45
5SD 42
Complete Leaders
RUNS BATTED IN RBI
1KC 121
2CHW 117
3TOR 116
4MIA/ATL 113
4BOS 113
Complete Leaders
Hits H
1WSH/LAD 195
2TOR 191
3TOR 188
4KC 184
5ATL 180
Complete Leaders
Stolen Bases SB
1MIA/OAK 47
2KC 40
3WSH/LAD 32
4BAL 30
4HOU/CLE 30
Complete Leaders

Pitching Leaders Across the Board in Major League Baseball

Wins W
1LAD 20
2STL 17
3LAD 16
3NYY 16
5WSH/LAD 15
Complete Leaders
EARNED RUN AVERAGE ERA
1MIL 2.43
2WSH/LAD 2.46
3LAD 2.47
4MIL 2.56
5PHI 2.78
Complete Leaders
Saves SV
1SD 39
2CHW 38
2LAD 38
4ATL 37
5LAA 34
Complete Leaders
Strikeouts K
1TOR 248
2PHI 247
3NYY 243
4WSH/LAD 236
5MIL 234
Complete Leaders
Quality Starts QS
1LAD 27
2TOR 23
2MIA 23
4STL 22
5PHI 20
Complete Leaders

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2021 MLB Team Pitching Stats

Regular SeasonMLBYear to DateSelect a Split for the 2021 Regular SeasonMLB

TEAM LEAGUE W L ERA G GS CG SHO SV SVO IP H R ER HR HB BB SO WHIP AVG
1Los Angeles DodgersDodgers1‌‌‌ NL 106 56 3.01 162 162 1 17 56 83 1452.0 1107 561 486 161 63 486 1599 1.10 .207
2San Francisco GiantsGiants2‌‌‌ NL 107 55 3.24 162 162 2 18 56 85 1455.0 1254 594 524 151 63 416 1425 1.15 .230
3Milwaukee BrewersBrewers3‌‌‌ NL 95 67 3.50 162 162 2 19 44 73 1436.0 1156 623 558 168 77 537 1618 1.18 .218
4Tampa Bay RaysRays4‌‌‌ AL 100 62 3.67 162 162 1 13 42 64 1455.2 1264 651 593 184 55 436 1478 1.17 .232
5Chicago White SoxWhite Sox5‌‌‌ AL 93 69 3.73 162 162 4 13 43 68 1403.1 1205 636 581 182 51 485 1588 1.20 .229
6New York YankeesYankees6‌‌‌ AL 92 70 3.74 162 162 3 13 47 73 1435.1 1243 669 596 196 56 492 1569 1.21 .231
7Houston AstrosAstros7‌‌‌ AL 95 67 3.78 162 162 2 8 34 61 1445.0 1231 658 607 187 70 549 1456 1.23 .228
8Atlanta BravesBraves8‌‌‌ NL 88 73 3.88 161 161 2 18 40 67 1410.2 1237 656 608 183 66 516 1417 1.24 .234
9New York MetsMets9‌‌‌ NL 77 85 3.90 162 162 2 8 41 69 1379.1 1221 668 597 190 70 475 1453 1.23 .236
10Toronto Blue JaysBlue Jays10‌‌‌ AL 91 71 3.91 162 162 1 14 34 52 1405.1 1257 663 610 209 75 473 1468 1.23 .236
11Miami MarlinsMarlins11‌‌‌ NL 67 95 3.96 162 162 1 8 33 58 1415.0 1282 701 622 162 88 529 1381 1.28 .241
12St. Louis CardinalsCardinals12‌‌‌ NL 90 72 3.98 162 162 3 15 50 71 1417.0 1234 672 626 152 85 608 1225 1.30 .234
13Oakland AthleticsAthletics13‌‌‌ AL 86 76 4.02 162 162 3 11 39 67 1433.0 1362 687 640 191 64 439 1332 1.26 .247
14San Diego PadresPadres14‌‌‌ NL 79 83 4.10 162 162 2 11 43 71 1430.0 1277 708 651 205 87 516 1517 1.25 .237
15Boston Red SoxRed Sox15‌‌‌ AL 92 70 4.26 162 162 7 49 76 1419.0 1409 749 671 176 79 546 1527 1.38 .258
16Seattle MarinersMariners16‌‌‌ AL 90 72 4.30 162 162 1 10 51 84 1440.1 1356 748 688 197 69 485 1328 1.28 .247
17Detroit TigersTigers17‌‌‌ AL 77 85 4.32 162 162 2 7 42 66 1419.2 1370 756 681 199 82 571 1259 1.37 .252
18Cleveland IndiansIndians18‌‌‌ AL 80 82 4.34 162 162 9 39 58 1408.0 1281 727 679 216 59 522 1391 1.28 .240
19Philadelphia PhilliesPhillies19‌‌‌ NL 82 80 4.39 162 162 5 12 36 70 1418.2 1321 745 692 200 75 509 1480 1.29 .244
20Cincinnati RedsReds20‌‌‌ NL 83 79 4.40 162 162 1 8 41 66 1434.1 1330 760 702 206 64 617 1524 1.36 .244
21Kansas City RoyalsRoyals21‌‌‌ AL 74 88 4.64 162 162 1 7 37 62 1417.1 1375 788 731 189 62 591 1344 1.39 .254
22Los Angeles AngelsAngels22‌‌‌ AL 77 85 4.69 162 162 1 4 39 65 1421.2 1373 804 741 188 76 592 1453 1.38 .251
23Texas RangersRangers23‌‌‌ AL 60 102 4.79 162 162 3 31 51 1424.1 1402 815 758 232 61 513 1239 1.34 .256
24Washington NationalsNationals24‌‌‌ NL 65 97 4.80 162 162 1 8 36 72 1394.1 1364 820 744 247 71 548 1346 1.37 .254
25Colorado RockiesRockies25‌‌‌ NL 74 87 4.82 161 161 3 6 33 63 1397.0 1397 796 748 196 63 539 1269 1.39 .260
26Minnesota TwinsTwins26‌‌‌ AL 73 89 4.83 162 162 1 9 42 63 1419.1 1392 834 762 239 62 484 1317 1.32 .255
27Chicago CubsCubs27‌‌‌ NL 71 91 4.87 162 162 1 8 40 59 1412.2 1386 839 765 235 98 596 1358 1.40 .255
28Pittsburgh PiratesPirates28‌‌‌ NL 61 101 5.08 162 162 6 25 50 1396.1 1400 833 788 213 78 606 1312 1.44 .260
29Arizona DiamondbacksD-backs29‌‌‌ NL 52 110 5.11 162 162 3 4 22 50 1417.1 1480 893 804 232 75 555 1238 1.44 .267
30Baltimore OriolesOrioles30‌‌‌ AL 52 110 5.84 162 162 1 5 26 54 1402.0 1518 956 910 258 68 563 1234 1.48 .273

Earned Run Average All-Time Leaders

The earned run average of a pitcher is the most often referenced pitching statistic, second only to all-time victories. According to Baseball Almanac’s analysis, each of the following pitchers has one of the top 1,000 greatest career earned run averages in the history of Major League Baseball (ERA). Notes: A pitcher must have pitched at least 1,000 career innings in order to be included on this list; raw earned run averages are presented in order to further clarify the one-thousand greatest career earned run averages of all time; and a bold faced entry indicates that the pitcher was active during the previous Major League season.” It was in 1915 when Hall of Fame pitcher Ed Walsh (1st Ranked Career Earned Run Average Leader) responded to a question about pitching guidance with the words, ‘Hook up with some decent catchers.’ Walsh shared his thoughts on his time with the Chicago White Sox, when he collaborated with catcher Billy Sullivan.” – Edward Gruver in the novel Koufax (2000) ATRULY One notable inclusion on this list of the top 1,000 finest earned run averages in baseball history is Babe Ruth, who is a member of the 500 Home Runs Club and who ranks within the top twenty!

Is it true that Hall of Fame pitcher Bob Gibson had an earned run average of 1.12 in 1968?

Dutch Leonard, a pitcher with a lifetime earned run average in the top 100, had a 0.96 earned run average in 1914, setting the record for the lowest single season earned run average in baseball history (minimum of two-hundred innings pitched).

MLB Pitching Stats & MLB Pitching Leaders

1 J. Urías LAD 32 32 20 3 .870 0 0 13 0 0 185.2 151 67 61 19 38 195 2.96
2 A. Wainwright STL 32 32 17 7 .708 3 1 22 0 0 206.1 168 72 70 21 50 174 3.05
3 G. Cole NYY 30 30 16 8 .667 2 1 18 0 0 181.1 151 69 65 24 41 243 3.23
4 W. Buehler LAD 33 33 16 4 .800 0 0 27 0 0 207.2 149 61 57 19 52 212 2.47
5 M. Scherzer NYM 30 30 15 4 .789 1 0 18 0 0 179.1 119 53 49 23 36 236 2.46
6 C. Morton ATL 33 33 14 6 .700 0 0 19 0 0 185.2 136 77 69 16 58 216 3.35
7 K. Gausman TOR 33 33 14 6 .700 0 0 20 0 0 192.0 150 66 60 20 50 227 2.81
8 H. Ryu TOR 31 31 14 10 .583 1 1 13 0 0 169.0 170 85 82 24 37 143 4.37
9 Z. Wheeler PHI 32 32 14 10 .583 3 2 20 0 0 213.1 169 72 66 16 46 247 2.78
10 S. Matz STL 29 29 14 7 .667 0 0 9 0 0 150.2 158 70 64 18 43 144 3.82
11 M. Fried ATL 28 28 14 7 .667 2 2 19 0 0 165.2 139 61 56 15 41 158 3.04
12 K. Hendricks CHC 32 32 14 7 .667 1 0 19 0 0 181.0 200 101 96 31 44 131 4.77
13 C. Flexen SEA 31 31 14 6 .700 0 0 15 0 0 179.2 185 74 72 19 40 125 3.61
14 E. Rodríguez DET 32 31 13 8 .619 0 0 9 0 0 157.2 172 87 83 19 47 185 4.74
15 L. McCullers Jr. HOU 28 28 13 5 .722 0 0 15 0 0 162.1 122 59 57 13 76 185 3.16
16 R. Ray SEA 32 32 13 7 .650 0 0 23 0 0 193.1 150 62 61 33 52 248 2.84
17 A. DeSclafani SF 31 31 13 7 .650 2 2 15 0 0 167.2 141 61 59 19 42 152 3.17
18 F. Montas OAK 32 32 13 9 .591 0 0 20 0 0 187.0 164 79 70 20 57 207 3.37
19 C. Rodón CWS 24 24 13 5 .722 1 1 9 0 0 132.2 91 39 35 13 36 185 2.37
20 T. Mahle CIN 33 33 13 6 .684 0 0 12 0 0 180.0 158 78 75 24 64 210 3.75
21 D. Cease CWS 32 32 13 7 .650 1 1 10 0 0 165.2 139 77 72 20 68 226 3.91
22 W. Miley CHC 28 28 12 7 .632 1 1 15 0 0 163.0 166 64 61 17 50 125 3.37
23 C. Bassitt OAK 27 27 12 4 .750 1 1 16 0 0 157.1 127 55 55 15 39 159 3.15
24 J. Berríos TOR 32 32 12 9 .571 1 0 17 0 0 192.0 159 83 75 22 45 204 3.52
25 G. Márquez COL 32 32 12 11 .522 3 1 17 0 0 180.0 165 92 88 21 64 176 4.40
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G-Games is a proposal. GS- The Games Have Begun The letters W stand for wins and L stand for losses. WP CT- Percentage of wins and losses CG-Complete Games are exactly what they sound like. SHO- ShutoutsQS- Quality StartsSV- SavesBSV- Blown SavesSHO- ShutoutsQS- Quality Starts IP is an abbreviation for innings played. Pitched H- HitsR- RunsER- Earned RunsH- HitsR- RunsER- Earned Runs HR- Home Runs are permitted. BB- Takes a stroll Consequently, strikeouts ERA is an abbreviation for Earned Run Average.

Is High ERA Good or Bad in Baseball?

When we read about baseball statistics, we tend to see numbers such as batting average, home runs, RBIs, and stolen bases among other things. And, based on these statistics, we may legitimately conclude that the higher the player’s numbers are, the more talented he or she is. But what does the Earned Run Average (ERA) tell us about a pitcher’s ability to control the game? When learning about pitching stats for the first time, many people are perplexed as to whether a high earned run average (ERA) is a good or bad thing.

The earned run average (ERA) measures how many runs a pitcher allows on average over the course of nine innings.

A lower earned run average (ERA) correlates to fewer runs scored against a pitcher. The earned run average (ERA) of a pitcher is something that many people pay attention to – especially fantasy baseball fans – yet a low ERA does not always indicate whether a pitcher is effective or ineffective.

What is Considered a Good ERA?

There are a few commonly agreed principles for what constitutes a good ERA, even if the definition might differ from person to person.

What is a Good ERA in Major League Baseball?

The following is a breakdown of excellent ERAs against bad ERAs for pitchers currently playing in the Major Leagues (info courtesy offandom.com).

Rating Earned Run Average (ERA)
Exceptional 2.00 and under
Excellent 2.00 – 3.00
Above Average 3.00 – 4.00
Average 4.00 – 5.00
Below Average 5.00 – 6.00
Poor 6.00 and above

What is a Good ERA in High School Baseball?

When considering the depth of a hitting lineup in high school, it’s vital to understand that it’s different from the depth of a batting order in college or the Major Leagues. The lack of depth in a high school baseball lineup results in pitchers with lower earned run averages (ERA) than they would otherwise have. An analysis of high school pitchers’ earned run averages is provided below.

Rating Earned Run Average (ERA)
Exceptional 0.00 – 0.60
Excellent 0.60 – 1.20
Above Average 1.20 – 2.00
Average 2.00 – 3.00
Below Average 4.00 – 5.00
Far Below Average 5.00 and above

Because there is no standard set for gathering data from High School baseball games, determining what what constitutes a good ERA for High School pitchers can be challenging. Consider looking at some genuine high school pitching statistics, such as those on MaxPreps and Broward High School Baseball, to see how the above chart compares to the real world. In addition, high school baseball games are generally seven innings in length. As a result, when computing the ERA for a high school pitcher, most coaches will use a 7-inning game rather than a 9-inning game as the basis for their calculations.

In order to demonstrate how to calculate the ERA for High School baseball games, consider the following formula:ERA = 7 * (/)

Is a 4.5 ERA Good?

An ERA in baseball does not necessarily indicate whether a pitcher is excellent or poor – it is only one of the numerous signs that a coach may consider when evaluating a pitcher. In the case of specific statistics, it is beneficial to have a broad understanding of what each statistic signifies. (See also: In baseball, a pitcher with a 4.5 earned run average falls into the typical range for Major League pitchers, which is between 4.00 and 5.00. Moving down the ladder of competition, on the other hand, is associated with lower ERAs on average, therefore an ERA of 4.5 in high school baseball is considered to be below average.

This component is also highly influenced by the level of competition in the baseball league — the greater the quality of the batters in the league, the higher the ERA is likely to be.

What is a Good Career ERA in Baseball?

On average, most pitchers in the Major Leagues will have a career span of around 5.6 years, but what does a decent ERA look like for those fortunate few who are able to make a career out of pitching look like? In general, a lifetime ERA in the range of 4.00 – 5.00 is regarded to be a decent one, with the best pitchers having ERAs below 2.00 on the season.

According to Baseball Almanac, Ed Walsh is credited with having the best lifetime earned run average (1.82), which he achieved throughout his playing career.

Why a Low ERA is Better Than a High ERA in Baseball

To further comprehend why a low ERA is preferable to a high ERA, let’s first examine what an ERA is in the first place. ERA is an abbreviation for Earned Run Average. In baseball, the Earned Run Average (ERA) is the average number of earned runs that a pitcher has allowed during a nine-inning span. Calculating a pitcher’s earned run average (ERA) is as simple as taking the amount of earned runs a pitcher has allowed, dividing that number by the number of innings pitched, and multiplying the result by nine.

Check out the video below for an excellent demonstration of how to calculate a pitcher’s earned run average in baseball.

ERA Only Calculates Earned Runs

One thing to keep in mind is that a pitcher’s earned run average (ERA) is only determined based on the earned runs the pitcher has allowed. This implies that if a runner scores on an error, the run does not count towards a pitcher’s earned run average (ERA) calculation. As a result, when a fielder makes a mistake, this statistic does not punish the pitcher. One of the primary reasons coaches value a pitcher’s earned run average (ERA) is that they may deduce that pitchers with a lower ERA are more difficult to hit than pitchers with a higher ERA.

Consider the following scenario: a groundball hit near the shortstop may be a simple play for one shortstop, but a base hit for another shortstop who is moving more slowly.

Pitchers With a High ERA Give Up More Runs on Average

It is one of the most important reasons why so many people pay attention to a pitcher’s ERA is that the ERA is a rather accurate predictor of how many runs the pitcher allows. Baseball, like most other sports, is won when one team scores more runs than the other team throughout the course of the game. As a result, it stands to reason that pitchers with a lower ERA will provide their side a significantly higher chance of winning the game. A low earned run average (ERA) does not always equate to more wins, but it does indicate that a pitcher with a low ERA is more likely to provide his team a greater chance of winning than a pitcher with a high ERA does.

High ERA Pitchers Allow More Base Runners

Now that we understand that the earned run average (ERA) is computed solely on the basis of the pitcher’s earned runs, we can make an informed judgment that pitchers with a high ERA will also allow a greater number of base runners. Because, after all, the only way for a hitter to score is to get on base first, which is the only thing he can do. In order for the run to be considered legitimate, the base runner must reach base without the defense committing an error. Consequently, in order for the base runner to be included in the pitcher’s earned run average, he or she must first reach base through a walk or a single.

Baseball games are frequently decided by only a few runs, thus any statistic that a coach or manager can utilize to inform them on how to allow fewer runs is beneficial to the club.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, the earned run average (ERA) is the average number of runs allowed by a pitcher for every nine innings thrown by that pitcher. It is calculated by multiplying the number of earned runs allowed by nine and dividing the total number of innings pitched by the number of earned runs allowed. Runners who reach base on errors (including errors by pitchers) do not count towards the pitcher’s earned run average if they subsequently score. Henry Chadwickis credited with inventing the statistic, which gained popularity as a measure of pitching performance once relief throwing became popular in the 1900s.

  • After pitchers such as James Otis Crandall and Charlie Hall established themselves as relief specialists, determining a pitcher’s success through the traditional approach of tabulating wins and losses became more difficult.
  • ERAs for prior seasons are listed in modern-day baseball encyclopedias, although these were calculated many years after the players’ actual accomplishments.
  • The importance of a strong ERA changes from year to year, just as the value of a high batting average.
  • (two earned runs allowed per nine innings).
  • For those years, only pitchers of the quality ofDazzy Vance orLefty Grove were able to maintain an ERA below 3.00 on a continuous basis.
  • Currently, a pitcher’s ERA of less than 4.00 is regarded extremely outstanding, however pitchers like as Greg Maddux and Pedro Martnez stand out in the same way as Grove and Vance did in their day.
  • The current world record is 1.12, which was established by Bob Gibson in 1968.
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Currently, Ed Walsh holds the career ERA record of 1.82, and Clayton Kershaw is the active player with the lowest career ERA (among those who have more than 1,000 innings pitched, a threshold that excludes most relief pitchers) with a 2.44 ERA through the 2019 season (as measured by innings pitched).

  1. This earned him the right, in many fans’ eyes, to be considered on an equal footing with starters in debates over the title of “greatest pitcher” if the term “greatest pitcher” were to be used.
  2. This can occur if a pitcher allows one or more runs to score without striking out a hitter in the process (usually in a single appearance).
  3. A pitcher’s earned run average (ERA) between 2.00 and 3.00 is regarded exceptional and is only reached by the greatest pitchers in the league.
  4. An earned run average (ERA) of between 4.00 and 5.00 is considered ordinary; the vast majority of pitchers have an ERA in this range.
  5. It can be inaccurate to evaluate relief pitchers only on the basis of their earned run averages (ERAs), because a pitcher is only accountable for the runs scored by batters who reach base after he has pitched.
  6. If he retires the next hitter, his earned run average for the game would be zero, despite the fact that he has relinquished the lead.
  7. This ability to exert their greatest effort for a few innings, or even only for a few hitters, allows relievers to maintain their ERAs as low as possible.

Since the introduction of the designated hitter rule in the American League in 1973, pitchers who have spent the majority of their careers in the AL have been at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to maintaining low ERAs when compared to National League pitchers, who can often get an easy out facing the ninth batter in the AL (oddly, Martinez and Rivera, the ERA kings of the last decade or so, have been mostly active in the American League).

This disparity between the leagues also affects relievers, though not to the same extent as it does starters.

The park in which a pitcher’s club plays half of its games, as well as the tendency of official scorers to award errors or base hits in situations that might be either, can all have an impact on his or her earned run average (ERA).

Because of the high altitude in Denver, fly balls can go up to 10% farther than they would at sea level, reducing the ability of pitchers to throw efficient breaking balls in the field.

When it comes to contemporary baseball, Sabermetrics is a technique that makes use of severalDefense independent pitching statistics in an attempt to quantify a pitcher’s skill independently of elements that are outside his control.

All-Time Leaders

Rank Player ERA Team(s) Year(s)
1 Ed Walsh 1.82 Chicago (AL),Boston (NL) 1904 – 17
2 Addie Joss 1.89 Cleveland 1902 – 1910 Boston (NA),Chicago (NL)
3 Mordecai Brown 2.06 St. Louis (NL),Chicago (NL),Cincinnati,Brooklyn (FL),St. Louis (FL),Chicago (FL),Chicago (NL) 1903 – 16
4 John Loomis Hamilton 2.10 Providence,New York (NL),Brooklyn (NL),New York (NL) 1878 – 94

What is a Good and Bad Earned Run Average?

Pitcher’s Earnings-per-Pitcher (ERA) Calculation in Major League Baseball Betting What is the difference between a good and a bad earned run average? MLB Handicapper, Lootmeister.com, Lootmeister.com The earned run average (ERA) of a pitcher is one of the most critical statistics he may have in his arsenal of tools. It is, without a doubt, the most telling statistic that we use to evaluate a pitcher’s performance. Certain other numbers, such as a pitcher’s won-loss record or his WHIP, have a significant influence on the outcome of a game (walks and hits per innings pitched).

  1. In this regard, the earned run average (ERA) remains the most important pitching statistic.
  2. If he allows an average of 2 runs per nine innings pitched, his earned run average (ERA) would be stated as 2.00.
  3. Because victories and losses are occasionally gained in questionable methods, fans, the media, and those in the industry prefer to look at the winning and losing percentages first.
  4. To put it another way, the fewer runs you allow, the lower your earned run average (ERA).
  5. Look for pitchers with a low earned run average (ERA).
  6. From the comfort of your own home, you may place bets on baseball games using your credit card.
  7. First and foremost, you have starters, middle relievers, and closers, each of whom has his or her own definition of excellence to live up to.
  8. Some of the more common watermarks used in ERA are listed below.

(There have only been three pitchers with a career ERA less than 1.00, and all three were born around the turn of the century; about 1900’ish) 1.50:If a pitcher, whether a starter or a reliever, has an ERA in this range, he is unquestionably a great pitcher who is either already a star or is on his way to become one.

  • A pitcher that resides in this area is most likely one of the best in the league at his position.
  • 2.50:This is an excellent ERA for any pitcher to have.
  • 3.00: For a starter who throws a lot of innings, 3.00 is a respectable earned run average.
  • Filmed by (Jim Palmer/Bruce Sutter/Trevor Hoffman/Rollie Fingers/Felix Hernandez) in the United States.
  • Still, he’s certainly good enough to earn a slot in the starting lineup.
  • If your score is less than 4.00, you’re in good shape.
  • 4.50:A 4.50 ERA is acceptable for a young pitcher just getting started in the Majors or for a veteran who is going through a tough period, but it is not going to get a player where he wants to go in the game.
  • Bob Gibson, a starting pitcher in contemporary times, holds the record with a 1.12 earned run average in 1968.
  • However, the winner of the ERA championship is frequently somewhere between the high-ones and the high-twos.
  • Relievers do not accumulate enough innings to be eligible for season ERA championships.
  • A relief pitcher has had some of the lowest ERA totals in recent memory, including 0.60 in 2012 and.061 in 1990, respectively, for Fernando Rodney and Dennis Eckersley, respectively.

It may not convey the entire tale, but it does reveal a significant portion of it. It is the most revealing statistic when it comes to determining how well a pitcher is at what he is expected to do—keep rival teams’ offenses to a minimum of runs.

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In the more than 100 years of Major League Baseball history, there have been a plethora of outstanding pitchers. The following is a ranking of the absolute greatest Major League Baseball pitchers from the modern period, which is defined in this case as 1960 and onward. During this time, the game welcomed the four pitchers who currently hold the top four spots on the all-time strikeout list. While some other pitchers, such as modern-day aces like Clayton Kershaw or Noah Syndergaard, may push their way into our list in the future, the pitchers on our list have all ended their pitching careers.

and continues with the most dominant closer in baseball history.

12. Mariano Rivera

Statistics: 1,283.2 innings pitched, 82-60 batters faced, 652 strikeouts, 2.21 earned run average, 1.00 earned run average, 8.3 strikeouts per nine innings pitched. Rivera, the best closer in the history of the game, completed 89.07 percent of his regular season save opportunities (652/732) to earn the title of greatest closer ever. The 652 saves that Rivera has amassed throughout his time with the New York Yankees are the most well-known of the several records he possesses. Given the high turnover rate among closers, it seems probable that the record will remain in place for the foreseeable future.

 According to a Sports Illustrated article, former New York Yankees manager Joe Torre reportedly stated, “Let’s face it- the regular season for Mo is fantastic, but that’s just the cupcakes and the ice cream.” What distinguishes him from the rest of the field is his performance in the postseason.” With five World Series championships and an 8-1 postseason record with a 0.70 ERA, Rivera is a 13-time All-Star who has converted 42 of 47 save opportunities.

He has also won five Cy Young Awards.

11. Jim Palmer

Stats: 268-152, 2.86 ERA, 1.180 WHIP, 2,212 strikeouts in 3,948 innings pitched Jim Palmer, like Mariano Rivera, spent his whole professional baseball career with the same franchise, the Baltimore Orioles. From 1965 through 1978, Palmer won 20 or more games in a season eight times, all of which occurred during the 1970 and 1978 seasons. Palmer’s career spans 19 seasons, beginning in 1965. Palmer was recognized for his great defensive play during this time period, earning three Cy Young awards as the league’s top pitcher and four Gold Glove trophies for his outstanding defensive play.

With a 2.61 earned run average and 90 strikeouts in 17 outings, he ended with an 8-3 record in the postseason. Palmer made history in 1966 by becoming the youngest pitcher to ever pitch a shutout in the World Series at the age of 20 years and 11 months, a mark that has stood to this day.

10. Curt Schilling

Statistics: 216-146, 3.46 ERA, 1.14 WHIP, 3,116 strikeouts in 3,261 innings. Having retired from baseball, Schilling has generally only made headlines when he says or does something controversial, such as when he posts anti-Muslim jokes to his personal Facebook page. But put aside the possibility that he’s a bit of a jerk in real life, since for 20 years on the mound, he was a complete and total professional. On his way to three World Series championships and being named the MVP of the Fall Classic in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks, Schilling had a stellar career that spanned five different teams in both the American and National Leagues.

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In 2001 and 2004, he was the league’s leading strikeout pitcher, and he presently ranks 15th all-time in the majors in that category.

Kathy Willens contributed to this report.

9. Pedro Martinez

Stats: 219-100, 2.93 ERA, 1.054 WHIP, 3,154 strikeouts in 2,827.1 innings pitched. Martinez had a 2.20 earned run average and over 250 strikeouts each season during the late 1990s and the early 2000s, according to baseball-reference.com. Martinez won three Cy Young trophies throughout his career, one with the Montreal Expos and two with the Boston Red Sox. He won the National League Cy Young Award with the Expos and the American League Cy Young Award twice with the Red Sox. Moreover, Pedro is a member of the uncommon ‘Pitching Triple Crown’ club, having achieved that feat in 1999 by going 23-4 (most wins), 2.07 ERA (lowest ERA), and 313 strikeouts (most strikeouts).

 Martinez posted a 6-4 record in the playoffs while boasting a 1.08 WHIP — a statistic that he was accustomed to dominating as he led the league in ERA five times during his previous five seasons in the league.

8. Nolan Ryan

Stats: 324-292, 3.19 ERA, 1.247 WHIP, 5,714 strikeouts in 5,386 innings pitched Nolan Ryan’s career has yet to be equaled in terms of duration, having spanned almost 27 seasons in the majors and four distinct decades in the game. Ryan was recognized for having an excellent arm, routinely clocking in at speeds in excess of 100 mph on the radar gun and maintaining a high velocity until the final phases of his professional football career. Â The most significant record he established was for all-time strikeouts, with 11 seasons in a row in which he led the league in strikeouts.

Ryan has thrown seven no-hitters, which is more than any other pitcher in history; yet, he also has another, less glamorous record, having walked 2,795 batters in his career.

However, despite his domination, Ryan was never honored with the Cy Young Award. Photo courtesy of Associated Press photographer Bill Janscha.

7. Steve Carlton

Stats: 329-244, 3.22 ERA, 1.247 WHIP, 4,136 strikeouts in 5,217.2 innings pitched. Carlton had a long and successful MLB career, which spanned from 1965 through 1984 and included stops with six different teams. However, he is most well-known for his stint with the Philadelphia Phillies, who he joined after being acquired from the St. Louis Cardinals in what is widely regarded to be one of the finest transactions in the history of baseball. Carlton put up great numbers during this time period, and he was recognized with four Cy Young Awards.

His 1972 season was arguably the most dominant in baseball history, as he went 27-10 with a 1.97 ERA and 310 strikeouts while winning the Triple Crown, as well as the Cy Young Award, for his efforts.

6. Roger Clemens

Statistical information: 354-184, 3.12 ERA, 4,672 strikeouts in 4,916.2 innings Clemens was one of the most dominant forces on the mound during his 24-year professional baseball career, which spanned four different organizations. â€The Rocket†is third on the all-time strikeout chart with 4,732 and has a victory total that is nearly twice as high as his losses in his career. Clemens was awarded seven Cy Young Awards, as well as seven championships for having the lowest earned run average (ERA) in a season.

But this may not have been his most dominating period of the season.

Two of his World Series titles came with the New York Yankees, both of which occurred just before millennium’s turn.

Kathy Willens contributed to this report.

5. Sandy Koufax

Statistics: 165-87 record, 2.76 ERA, 1.106 WHIP, 2,396 strikeouts in 2,324.1 innings pitched Koufax is widely regarded as the gold standard in the field of pitching brilliance. The dominant streak that Koufax had in the mid-1960s was unusually long, and it is difficult to find a pitcher who can match it. Between 1963 and 1966, Koufax posted a record of 97-27, as well as a 1.86 earned run average and 1,228 strikeouts. During this time, he won three Cy Young awards and was named the National League MVP on three separate occasions.

Clayton Kershaw, a fellow lefty and the current number one pitcher in the game, has earned countless parallels to Koufax as a result of his domination while wearing a Los Angeles Dodgers outfit.

If Kershaw can maintain his dominance, and possibly even remain healthy for a longer period of time than Koufax did, he will very certainly be considered one of the all-time greats to grace the game in the same way that Koufax is. (Image courtesy of AP)

4. Bob Gibson

Stats: 251-174, 2.91 ERA, 1.188 WHIP, 3,117 strikeouts in 3,884.1 innings pitched. In addition to winning two World Series victories, a Cy Young Award and an NL MVP Award during his career, Gibson has made a total of nine All-Star appearances and has been named to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Gibson, who was considered to have some of the greatest â€pure stuff†of any pitcher in baseball history, was elected into Cooperstown (Hall of Fame) on his first vote in 1981, making him the youngest player ever to do so.

 Gibson’s post-season accomplishments are well documented, as are those of the other pitchers on this list as well.

Bob Gibson is also a member of the renowned no-hitterâ€TMs club, which was founded in 1922.

3. Tom Seaver

Stats: 311-205, 2.86 ERA, 128 ERA+, 1.121 WHIP, 3,640 strikeouts in 4,783 innings, 2.86 ERA, 128 ERA+ During his rookie season with the New York Mets in 1967, Seaver earned the Rookie of the Year award, and he still maintains the franchise record for most victories with the team. Over the course of his 20-year professional career, he was awarded three National League Cy Young Awards. Seaver was elected into Cooperstown in 1992, when he established a record for the greatest vote percentage for induction ever with a score of 98.84 percent, which remains the highest in baseball history.

In 1969, he was an integral part of the New York Mets’ World Series victory.

According to BaseballHall.org

2. Greg Maddux

355-227, 3.16 ERA, 1.143 WHIP, 3,371 strikeouts in 5,008.1 innings pitched When it came to striking out batters, Greg Maddux relied on his excellent precision to place pitches in the corners of the strike zone to keep them off the base paths of his offerings. He won four Cy Young trophies in a row from 1992 to 1995 while pitching for the Atlanta Braves, which included Hall of Famers Tom Glavine and John Smoltz. He retired after his last season in 1995. When the Braves won their first World Series in 1995, this was the rotation that contributed to that victory.

In the 1990s, no other pitcher accumulated more victories than Maddux, who is now ranked eighth on the all-time wins record with 355.

1. Randy Johnson

Stats: 303-166, 3.29 ERA, 1.171 WHIP, 4,875 strikeouts in 4,135.1 innings pitched. Randy Johnson is widely regarded as the most scary pitcher to ever take the mound, because to his towering height and lanky build, as well as his uncanny sidearm delivery. Because of his 6’10” size, Johnson was dubbed “The Big Unit” because of his deadly fastball, which often reached speeds of 100 mph or higher. The five-time Cy Young Award winner led the league in strikeouts nine times throughout his career and is presently ranked second all-time in this category with 4,875, trailing only Nolan Ryan, who holds the record of 4,875 strikeouts.

In addition, the 10-time All-Star was the first pitcher to win the Triple Crown in baseball in 2002.

In addition to his outstanding regular-season accomplishments, Johnson was awarded the post-season MVP in 2001, the year in which he won his first and only World Series victory with the San Francisco Giants. Denis Poroy contributed to this report.

Goliath Team

Since 2013, Jack Sackman has been contributing to Goliath’s film and television coverage.

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