How To Drag A Baseball Field

Dragging Patterns

When it comes to traditional grass infields, there are really just two dragging patterns to take into consideration. Following a course parallel to the grass borders of the infield skin, working your way inside, is what the Parallel Drag Pattern is all about. Keep an eye on your speed when cornering; slower is preferable. If you drive too rapidly, you will fling surplus material toward the outside border of the drag, where it will collect and accumulate in those locations. Combined with the parallel pattern, the Overlapping Circles Pattern is used to cross drag the infield and create a smoother surface.

If you move too rapidly, you may find yourself with a “bowling out” of the middle of the infield.

For smaller infields, consider doing it by hand.

You may find that dragging by hand is the best solution for little minor league grounds. Turning a drag in tight circles is difficult to accomplish with a tractor without dumping dirt or topdressing off the end of the drag, which will result in a bowling out effect over time if done repeatedly. In order to limit drag-related migration of infield material, dragging the infield skin by hand will provide you with the control you require. Watch the video on the following slide to see how a smaller infield is dragged by the hand.

Hand dragging a Little League field.

Because they cover such a huge area of soil, completely skinned infields might be more difficult to keep at a consistent surface grade than their grass-covered counterparts. This exposed soil is more vulnerable to wind and rain erosion because of its exposed nature. The use of proper dragging procedure, which includes dragging patterns, will help to reduce soil movement and maintain surface grade. Let’s have a look at various dragging patterns for infields that are completely skinned.

Avoid the “outward swirl”.

A common pattern that appears rational on the surface turns out to be the worst pattern you could ever utilize. The “outward swirl” is what we’re talking about. To begin, you should start in the centre and work your way outward in a reverse swirl toward your turf grass, correct? WRONG. By employing this strategy, you may remove dirt from the center of your fully skinned infield – the pinnacle of your crown — and place it on the outer areas of the infield. By removing the crown, you are removing your infield’s slope, which interferes with the flow of water.

The “inward swirl”.

The same concept, but with far greater outcomes. Instead of being a “retention pattern,” the inward swirl is a “building pattern,” which means it may really assist in retaining or building up the crown of your infield. Each day’s beginning point may be customized by using the clock face. Drag from the outside edge of the infield skin, working your way inward, until you reach a point somewhere about the middle of the infield skin.

When you’re finished, the drag collects all of the stuff on the outside and dumps it in the middle of the drag. This aids in the preservation of correct surface grade and drainage.

Overlapping ovals, working your way inward.

Href=” data-modaal-type=”image” data-modaal-overlay-opacity=” data-modaal-overlay-opacity=” the id of the data modaal-desc=9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9; 9 You’ll finish up with a smooth infield surface that has been crosscut as you work your way towards the outfield.” > Using overlapping ovals as a pattern for fully skinned infields is another useful strategy.

  • To decide your beginning point on the outside boundaries of your infield, visualize the face of a clock on your infield, similar to the pattern utilized with a grass infield.
  • For example, if you started at 3 o’clock on Day 1, you should have made your way across the infield with overlapping ovals toward 9 o’clock on Day 2.
  • It doesn’t matter where you start from or how you rotate around the “clock”; always complete your rotation at the middle of the infield to assist in bringing material back to the top of the crown.
  • Rotating the orientation of this pattern

Or, use the Figure 8.

Using the face of a clock as a guideline, as you circle around the field, you’ll be creating figure 8s. As is customary, begin on the outside perimeter of the infield and work your way toward the center. It is possible to use this pattern to slow down the erosion of the infield slope while also benefitting from the cross-cutting properties of overlap.

Remember to cleanup after dragging.

Using a steel mat drag results in the collecting of “spoils,” or waste materials, which is a byproduct of the dragging process. This waste material is left behind after you have finished dragging and must be removed from your infield. Dragging is an excellent method of collecting tiny stones and huge clumps of dirt that will eventually make their way onto your infield. After scooping up the debris, level the remaining clean soil using a field rake or level board to make it look even and uniform in appearance.

A quick review before one more brief lesson.

Dragging is the most fundamental task involved in the upkeep of a baseball or softball diamond. It is typically the first thing that is done to the field following a game or practice. Dragging methods that are followed correctly may make or break the quality of your infield. In this post, we’ll take a deeper look at what appears to be a straightforward task. 1. What is the reason for dragging? First, let us go through the reasons why we drag the infield. It is common for players to damage the soil during games and practices, producing divots and cleat imprints in addition to large clumps of soil in their wake.

  • Rain can cause clods to “melt” and subsequently solidify, producing a rough, uneven surface if the field is not pulled before the clods are broken up and the soil is redistributed.
  • Upon completion of the drag, the field is uniform and visually pleasing.
  • The fact that we are dragging the surface on purpose should be noted because our objective is to move as little dirt as possible while doing so.
  • When performing normal maintenance, your objective is to groom the material rather than dragging it from one location to another.
  • 2.
  • In addition, each tool has a specific purpose and should be utilized at the correct moisture level for that particular instrument.
  • Used when the soil is relatively dry and has a friable condition, it should be effective (Figure 2).

In order to protect the granular topdressing from becoming mixed with the underlying soil underneath it, screen dragging is used.

Various sizes and combinations are available for screen drags; the biggest varieties have a tendency to sling more material while rotating, so avoid using very large or heavy screen drags.

Prior to being abraded by the metal screen, this assists in levelling out the soil surface.

Smoothing the surface should be accomplished by the use of a screen drag.

Figure 3: A screen drag is being dragged behind a utility vehicle for the sake of maintenance.

(Photo courtesy of Beacon Athletics.) A nail drag is a highly useful tool for keeping your infield in good condition, but it must be handled with extreme caution.

The drag should never penetrate more than 14 to 12 inches into the ground.

If the earth gives some resistance but the key penetrates it and comes out clean, the soil is suitable for nail dragging.

Once the substance has dried, pulling the nails too deeply will result in a loose, powdery surface (Figure 4).

Some of the dirt migrates into the grass margins, forming a lip around the grass.

Opening the skin before a rain will allow more water to seep into the skin rather than flow off the surface, thus avoid doing so before a rain.

Take note of the tracks in the dry stuff; when the ground becomes wet, this field will turn quite muddy.

The meteorological conditions—temperature, humidity, wind, and sunlight—have the greatest influence on infield drying.

If your field is solid enough to walk on, nail dragging your field will help expose more surface area to the air and speed up the drying process.

Avoid walking or running on the infield if it is not solid enough to prevent footprint impressions from appearing.

Everyone who has worked in the groundskeeping industry has learned the hard way that it is quite tempting to try to dry up the field.

Figure 5: This infield is too muddy to be used for either playing or working.

In addition, the footing would be shoddy, putting the players at danger of being injured themselves.

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Before any work can be done on the field, it must be allowed to dry completely.

Additionally, excessive nail dragging causes the topdressing substance to “sink,” necessitating the purchase and application of additional topdressing material.

If you want to build a nail drag, you should avoid using bolts because they are too forceful and because their flat bottoms tend to cause more surface disturbance than the neat incisions made by a sharp nail (Figure 6).

Figure 6b: Improper use of 12″ zinc hex bolts in the construction.

Finish drags are the third type of drag to consider.

Drags made of cocoa mats and tennis court brooms are two examples (Figure 7).

However, there is one exception to this rule: if the field is wet and your screen drag becomes clogged rapidly, you may use a cocoa mat drag to float across the surface, albeit this technique accomplishes nothing to truly level the soil.

(Photo courtesy of Beacon Athletics.) Figure 7b: When the field is too wet to screen drag, a cocoa mat drag is an excellent alternative.

You are now able to drag right over the anchors without having to fill them with dirt.

All dragging processes should be carried out in a clockwise and counterclockwise fashion.

When using a screen drag, it is often necessary to make more than one pass in order to thoroughly smooth the surface.

Resist the urge to begin in the center of the field and work your way outward when playing on an all-skin softball field.

On an all-skin field, you may either start at the outside and work your way inward, or you can employ a zamboni pattern throughout the entire field, switching directions every day.

Alternate between these patterns in order to prevent producing high and low patches on the playing surface.

(Photo courtesy of DiamondTex) When dragging, make sure to keep your feet at least a foot away from the grass (Figure 9).

This is simply plain obnoxious.

Edge upkeep is already the most difficult task on a groundskeeper’s list, therefore we don’t want to add to your workload later.

It is impossible to stress the significance of moving S-L-O-W!

Yes, you have four more fields to drag, and yes, it might be tedious, but you must not drag your field at a rapid pace.

The slinging of earth around the field caused by fast dragging generates a wavy pattern in the soil.

This is something that can only be taught by trial and error.

This guideline applies regardless of whether the drag is being pulled by a vehicle or by the hands of the puller.

Figure 9b: Using a hand rake, gently smooth the dirt near to the grass until it is smooth.

Maintain alternate directions while moving slowly and staying away from the boundaries of the field if it is too muddy.

For more information, please see our website’s previous editions of theH K Maintenance Minute, in which we cover additional field management methods to let your facility gleam. Good luck with your dragging! H K Sports Fields – Better Fields Lead to Better Performance.

Dragging Tips for a Baseball Infield

ByMCThe infield clay is one of the most important portions of the field that demands a great deal of attention. Many people observe the dragging routine before a game, but they are probably unaware that it is the 4th or 5th time that they have dragged the field that day, employing a variety of drags to prepare for the game. There are a variety of drags available, including flex drags, stiff drags, coco mats, nail drags, float board drags, harrow drags, and others. Groundskeepers at the highest level of competition not only drag the field before games, but they also drag the field during games.

  1. Infield clay types, moisture levels, and your equipment will all influence the amount of dragging and the optimum style of dragging you will need to perform.
  2. They are extremely quick and nimble.
  3. In certain parks, we even witness fields being pulled by hand, which is unusual.
  4. Many people think that hand dragging produces the finest finish drag on the infield as well.
  5. Ridged flex mats are available for those who need to undertake leveling tasks with the mats they are made up of.
  6. Because of the hard drags, the baselines, as well as regions surrounding the mound and plate, stay level much more easily than they would without them.
  7. Tips for dragging:
  1. Remember that this is not a race, so take your time, especially when it comes to your turn. Always maintain the drag approximately a foot away from the grass, and always pull the bases when you drag the ball around. While attempting to avoid second base may be entertaining, you are altering the gradient of your field and producing lips when you strike the turf with the drag. What happens if the drag does not follow the baseline? Don’t drag it all the way down to the baseline! You’ll need to rake these places and smooth them down using a smoothing board.
  1. Begin by tracing a tiny circle pattern across the whole field, then dragging a center line from one end of the field to the other.
  1. On a daily basis, alternate patterns and dragging directions from clockwise to counter clockwise
  2. Choose the finish drag that will result in the smoothest surface possible. Coco mats are commonly used for final dragging since they mostly brush the clay and do not displace material in the same way as large drags do.
  1. Some flex mats contain a leveling bar on the front that helps to eliminate little bumps from the workouts
  2. However, this is not always the case. Before you begin dragging, be certain that you have adequate moisture and that you are using the right nail type. to pull the deep ruts out of the way
  1. • After the drag, saturate the field with water to help it retain its shape and stability. You may have seen patterns in the clay sections during some of the allstar games. calcined clay, which has a lighter color than the remainder of the infield, is used for this material. Although it appears to be a ridge, it is really a soil conditioner that is used on a regular basis for infield maintenance.

How to Drag your Baseball or Softball Infield

ByMC Theinfieldclayis one of the most important components of the field that demands a great deal of TLC. There are many people that witness the dragging routine before a game, and many of them are probably unaware that it is the fourth or fifth time they have dragged the field on that particular day utilizing a variety of drags. There are a variety of drags available, including flex drags, stiff drags, coco mats, nail drags, float board drags, harrow drags, and others. As part of their preparation for games, groundskeepers at the proleveleven drag the pitch during matches.

  • There are various aspects that must be considered while determining which method or approaches to use.
  • The three-wheeled “sand pro” type devices are commonly used to haul drags at sports facilities.
  • When doing this activity, some people prefer to utilize a small smoothtired tractor since it leaves less tire tracks and ruts in the ground.
  • Due to the fact that it is all they have to drag their field.
  • Among recreational-level fields, the 4′ by 6′ flex mat is perhaps the most commonly encountered.
  • When compared to flex drags, a stiff drag draws more material into the screen and does not move with the curves as much.
  • The 3×3 stiff drags perform an excellent job of maintaining the level of the baselines, as well as the regions surrounding the mound and plate, when used properly.

The float board is another useful tool. These are occasionally manufactured by hand from wood or steel and are intended to level the infield of your baseball field. Tips for dragging:

  1. Remember that this is not a race, so take your time, especially when it comes to your turn. Always maintain the drag approximately a foot away from the grass, and always pull the bases when you drag the ball around. While attempting to avoid second base may be entertaining, you are altering the gradient of your field and producing lips when you strike the turf with the drag. What happens if the drag does not follow the baseline? Don’t drag it all the way down to the baseline! You must rake these areas and smooth them down using a smoothing board or acquire a drag that is appropriate for the job. Begin by tracing a tiny circle pattern across the whole field, then dragging a center line from one end of the field to the other. On a daily basis, alternate patterns and dragging directions from clockwise to counter-clockwise are performed
  2. Choose the finish drag that will result in the smoothest surface possible. Coco mats are commonly used for final dragging since they mostly brush the clay and do not displace material in the same way as large drags do. Some flex mats contain a leveling bar on the front that helps to eliminate little bumps from the workouts
  3. However, this is not always the case. Before you begin dragging, be certain that you have adequate moisture and that you are using the right nail type. to pull the deep ruts out of the way After the drag, a small amount of water should be applied to the field to stabilize the surface. You may have seen patterns in the clay sections during some of the allstar games. calcined clay, which has a lighter color than the remainder of the infield, is used for this material. Although it appears to be a ridge, it is really a soil conditioner that is used on a regular basis for infield maintenance. The wetness of the infield clay should be monitored throughout the day. Water should be added if the surface is too dry, but only after you’ve completed your normal morning ritual. After the games, talk to the participants about how the game went and make any required adjustments to your strategy. Have a good time
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Infield maintenance includes dragging the field, so pay close attention to the dirt as you drag it in order to assess if you’re using the proper drag.

Baseball Field Drags

Several different sorts of drags are required to keep your infield in optimum playing condition. Infield grooming, which includes everything from float drags and stiff drags to nail drags and harrow drags, necessitates that you adjust to the conditions of your infield. The type of infield soil you utilize, as well as the amount of moisture present, will determine the sort of baseball field drag you require. A firm drag will bring more material into the screen, which is useful for leveling. When dealing with obstinate clay particles that need to be broken up, heavier infield drags or the use of a leveling bar might be beneficial.

The Drag Spiker is an excellent tool for keeping your infield skin in good condition on a regular basis.

Infield float drags, also known as Quick Manual Drag Mats, are excellent finishing drags that can be pulled by hand for your infield, baselines, and home plate areas.

Visit our video collection to see the various demonstration and educational movies we have available.

Nail Dragging: Why & How – Beacon Athletics

If you have ever worked in baseball as a turf manager or groundskeeper, you are likely to be familiar with the notion of nail dragging. “You should think about nail dragging your soil every now and again,” someone may have said to you in the past. Alternatively, you may have heard the phrase “you’ve got to nail drag!” “Why should I go through with it?” you might wonder. With correct watering, raking, and dragging procedures, you may almost always achieve a satisfactory infield surface condition.

►Nail Dragging: Time and field expectations

In order to get down to the specifics of the nail drag and what it can accomplish for you, it is first necessary to address the issues of time and field expectations. Depending on the level of competition, the game day nail drag procedure might be time-consuming and need at least two hours, which includes finishing the screen dragging and noon watering. As baseball groundskeepers, we know that time management is critical to our ability to achieve success. In my experience, game day nail dragging occurs in spurts of activity, followed by pauses to answer emails or check weather predictions, among other things.

  1. start, I will frequently walk the nail drag across the infield skin for the first pass of the morning starting at 9:30 a.m.
  2. start.
  3. That does not imply that I have worked on the procedure for three continuous hours.
  4. To prepare for subsequent levels, one possible scenario for you at your facility is to begin nail dragging and complete the first pass before stepping back to work on the mound or cutting some turfgrass.
  5. Keep in mind that the weather will play a significant role in your infield skin’s performance throughout the day.

If rain is forecasted, it may be a good idea to forgo the nail dragging and instead roll to firm up your skin regions so that you are prepared to deal with the precipitation when it arrives.

►Three reasons when you should nail drag

  1. When it comes to field renovation, you want to spike your infield skin vigorously, potentially to a depth approaching one inch, so that you can either prepare the skin for regrading or push some calcined clay deeper into the profile. After scarifying the surface, it may be used in the fall or before to the season, or it can be used throughout the season if you have at least a few days before play to allow the surface to settle after scarifying. Following a rain occurrence, it is quite good to apply a nail drag to your infield skin as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that, regardless of the exact proportions of sand, silt, and clay in your batting cage mix, heavy rain will cause the majority of the finer sized particles in your infield mix to sink, while the coarse sand will rise to the top. The surface of your field will not be rendered unusable as a result of this, but the quality of the surface will be diminished. When coarser sand particles dominate the upper profile of the infield skin, the infield skin tends to play a little soft, and cleats tend to move a lot of loose material around as a result. So, following a rain event, as soon as you are able to get outside, start nail dragging.slowly. & the more fortunate you will be in the future
  2. Nail dragging on game day — This is the most exact of the three techniques. Let’s go a little more into this one.

►Game day nail dragging

For a truly nice nail drag to be executed on game day, the moisture content of the skin must be at the proper level of wetness. Therefore, depending on the time of year and your schedule, soaking the infield skin in a strong solution throughout the afternoon or night before gameday is important. It takes some time to become familiar with your field, its sun patterns, and how it responds to water. Consider that if there is a prediction for dry weather, the post-game watering will need to be extensive.

  • Also keep in mind that you will need to use less water in the areas where runners take the lead off first and second base.
  • This is accomplished by soaking in large amounts of water after practice or games.
  • What is the significance of this?
  • Dust management and look are important, but light watering infield soil for appearance or dust control will not result in a high-end surface that delivers excellent ground balls and hops for your infielders.
  • My preferred method of walking a nail drag is because it is both healthy and allows me to get a good sense of the state of the dirt at the same time.
  • The earth should be damp such that nail dragging can effectively scarify all of the cleat marks to a depth of about one-quarter inch.
  • No matter what sort of utility vehicle or trap rake you use to nail drag, remember to start off gently and work your way up the hill.
  • If you maintain a steady speed while driving, the surface will always be smoother as a result.
  • The following are the two most common reasons for nail dragging on game day:
  1. It is necessary to clear up all of the cleats and traffic markings from the previous day. It is necessary to prepare the infield surface for the game.

It is the tractor and nail drag that are being used to tighten the skin while you work on it that are referred to as “set up.” As a result, I prefer treaded tires on the trap rake rather than knobby tires for this reason (picture below). The tires, as well as the repetition of the nail drag traveling over the earth, will aid in the firming up of the ground surface. I will continue to drive thenail dragover certain locations in tight figure-eight patterns to help firm up the ground in heavy traffic areas where infielders play and the lead off area near 2nd base to help firm up the dirt.

Once you have completed all of your work to your satisfaction, you can screen drag the surface to finalize it before watering it in the middle of the day.

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The amount of watering required following this procedure is determined on the time of your game that day or evening, as well as a variety of meteorological considerations.

Take into account the sky cover, wind, dew points, and any rain that may be in the forecast, and then make adjustments to your plans.

All about nail drag and bolt drag for a baseball field

Davidin Louisiana writes: I wanted toask you about baseball field drags. I hear aboutdrags having nails and bolts. I hear some say don’t use dull bolts- make sure you have something sharp. What do youthink about all that from experience? After reading about not usingthe bolts I thought about taking them out and grinding them sharpthinking that would help. Appreciate yourthoughts. Thanks. – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Hello David, Both a baseballfield nail drag and bolt drag have a place in your arsenal offieldmaintenance tools. Thedrag with the bolts, or what some people would call a spike drag,is great for breaking up hardened surfaces or disintegrating smallweed seedling starting to pop up.Often the bolt drag isheavier and is intended to break up the surface a bit deeper thana nail drag.I have a spikedrag that is a rectangular metal frame about 4 feet wide and 3 feetlong with three rows of bolts alternating where they come down onthe ground. If needed I put my nail drag on top of the spike dragfor additional weight to sink the bolts down into the baseball dirta bit more. The spike dragis good for dragging in spirals around the baseball or softballinfield to also level it out a bit. My spike drag can be flippedover, bolts up, so the smooth flat metal then drags and moves dirtto level as needed. This drag is heavy and must be pulled by a ridingmower or tractor. No way you would hand drag with this. The spike dragor bolt drag is not intended to be your final grooming, but if needed,the field is still quite playable. I use my spike drag about onceevery month or so on the baseball and softball fields. On the otherhand anail dragis used more often. Like its nameimplies it is usually a wood frame with a series of rows of nailssticking out. Usually 4 inch nails through a 2×4 so about an inchof nail sticks out. Too much sticking out results in nails bendingover. Not good.This drag is used more to scarify the surfaceand can be your final grooming.You can also finish itoff with a metal mesh drag.Nail drags workbest if the ground is not too hard. You want to rough up the surfaceonly, not dig way in with a nail drag. If the surface is quite hard,then use a bolt drag with weights first to dig it up a bit, followedby the nail drag. You should nothave to put weight very often on the drag with nails. If you dothe nails will bend and not work as well. Nails really only needto stick out of the wood by a half inch for it to work.Naildrags are great for working soil conditioner such as calcined clayinto the top inch of your baseball dirt.My nail dragis about 5 feet wide by 3 feet. It is too heavy to pull by hand.Ipullmy baseball field nail drag and bolt drag with a tractor. Ithas wheels on the reverse side so I can flip it over and pull itfrom the storage bin to the complex of four basebal and softballfields. I sometimes lay the spike drag on top to haul it to thefields also.I’m sure you’llread or hear about many variations of this. Try to see what worksbest for you and understand the pros/cons and uses or each. I wouldn’t discountany idea until you prove it unworkable for you. And here isa picture of a heavy duty spike and leveling attachment used bya tractor to get a softball field ready for the spring.Thisis good for digging up the dirt, removing weeds, and leveling it. Definitely have to follow use of this with the bolt, nail, and metalmesh drag to get a proper playing surface.Yours for betterplay more often, J.ReinerJim ReinerPublisher, Editor,GroundskeeperThe UltimateBaseball Field Renovation Guide
JimReiner was a groundskeeper with the Texas Rangers AAA team and hasbeen involved with baseball his entire adult life.He devoteshis efforts to training coaches, players, and parents of all levelsof youth baseball and softball to use their existing field and turnit into a safe, high performance field. Jim’s website has been onlinesince 2006 helping hundreds of thousands from little league to probaseball improve their ball fields.

Dragging Practices on Infields

On infields, there are two sorts of drags that may be used. Nail drags and mat drags are two types of drags. This is an extremely vigorous drag that is used to loosen the surface and integrate conditioners such as Turface® into the paintwork. Before applying the nail drag, make sure the surface is damp to ensure optimum penetration of the nail drag tool. The mat drag’s function is to smooth out the surface and break up clumps in order to give the surface a completed, polished appearance. Mat drags are available from your distributor in a range of materials, including coconut fiber, steel, and carpet.

You can drag in whatever pattern you like with either drag, but avoid falling into the trap of dragging your field in the same manner every time.

This results in irregularities in the surface of your infield.

When dragging your infield, the following actions will ensure your success.

  1. Remove the bases from the sleeves and insert the plugs into them. It is important to keep at least six inches away from grass areas to avoid dragging dirt into the turf and producing lip buildup. High spots surrounding bases should be raked down using the rear of your rake. Water your infield and let it to soak into the soil for a few minutes. Hold the hose up high to imitate rain, and if feasible, have someone else hold the hose to prevent it from dragging over the infield. Begin by nail dragging the top 1/2 to 1 inch of your infield mix to loosen it up. Mat dragging should be started once the infield dirt has dried to ensure a smooth, completed surface. To avoid high and low places, particularly where you halt, alternate dragging patterns. Drag carefully in order to prevent soil from spreading to grass areas and to obtain a groomed look. Match the drag widths to the base path dimensions so that the work may be completed in one or two full passes
  2. Hand dragging the edges reduces lip build-up and is required on the mound, base paths, and plate regions, among other places. Slowly drag your feet. In the event that you are throwing earth while dragging, you are traveling too rapidly. Whenever you are leaving the field, pick up and shake the drag to prevent dirt from being dragged off of the infield and into the grass. In the case of base paths, you can either use a drag to move the base pathways down or manually rake the base paths to get the same outcomes as a drag. For further information, see “Maintaining Base Paths.”

Baseball Field Drags and Softball Drag Mats

Any owner of a baseball or softball field is familiar with the difficulties of keeping the field in good condition for game day. It is at this point that we come in. In addition to all-steel drag mats, rigid steel drag mats, nail drags, infield eraser mats, and heavy-duty drag chains for tractors, we also have mats that are specifically intended for rock removal. Contact us now to learn more about our field drag equipment. Maintaining your baseball or softball infield on game days and off days does not have to be a time-consuming chore.

Alternatively, our rigid steel drag mat is the most popular choice among groundskeepers at every level of play and in virtually every field condition (except for damp, wet fields).

We’ve got you covered there, too!

Because it operates in moist, damp soil conditions that would normally “load up” ordinary metal drags, it can help to make your playing surface more level, safer, and more enjoyable.

Don’t have access to a tractor?

This nail drag is ideal for scarifying the baselines, cutouts, and home plate sections of baseball diamonds.

Every type of soil condition, as well as every level of play, is covered by our product offering.

If you don’t find what you’re looking for or aren’t sure which drag mat is best for your application, please contact one of our field or facility specialists for assistance.

We have decades of combined expertise and would be delighted to assist you in finding the most qualified candidate for your profession.

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