How To Make A Baseball Bat

How to Make a Baseball Bat

Article in PDF format Article in PDF format When you make your own baseball bat, you might develop a more personal relationship with the sport. Made-by-hand bats may also make wonderful souvenirs to be passed down from one generation to the next. Using a wood turning lathe, you can create a long-lasting baseball bat that is guaranteed to be a home run in the field.

  1. 1 Gather all of your supplies and equipment. Prepare all of your equipment and materials before starting a woodworking job. Make sure you have everything you need before starting. In order to ensure that all of your chisels are clean and sharp, check them as you gather your tools.
  • To make the bat, start with a wooden “blank.” The following tools are required: wood lathe (which may be acquired from a tool or hardware shop)
  • Roughing gouge, skew chisel, and parting tool are among the several chisels available. Calipers are used to measure things with a pencil. Sandpaper (in a variety of grits ranging from 60 to 600)
  • Wood stain and varnish
  • 2 Select a sort of wood from which to construct your bat. Ash wood has traditionally been used to construct baseball bats. Maple and birch are two more popular woods to work with.
  • Ash is a sturdy, lightweight wood that is both tough and flexible
  • It is commonly used in furniture construction. Maple is a denser, heavier wood that is ideal for power hitters because of its density. Unlike maple, birch gives a greater weight while yet retaining some flexibility, similar to ash.
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  • s3 Purchase a circular blank of the wood of your choice. Another option is to create your own blank by cutting a piece of wood that is 37 inches long, 3 inches wide, and 3 inches high. Find a lumber yard to acquire custom-sized pieces of wood, or check out a home improvement store to see what they have available. You may also get blank bats that are ready to be transformed into a bat online.
  • If you’re starting with a square piece of wood, you’ll need to chisel the corners off your blank before continuing. A tiny amount should be cut off each of the four long edges of the blank to form an octagonal shape. Removing the corners will reduce the quantity of wood you need to remove with the lathe, which will make it easier to construct your bat.
  • 4Make four-inch marks on the wood with a pencil. To help you determine how much wood you’ll need to remove in portions, make a pencil mark every few inches every few inches. 5 Determine the maximum barrel diameter that you desire. A standard baseball bat has a diameter ranging from 2 12″ and 2 5/8″ in diameter. A smaller diameter bat will be lighter and easier to swing than a larger diameter bat.
  • The bat’s handle should have a diameter of one inch and be around ten inches in length.
  • 6 Make a mark on each portion of the bat to indicate its diameter. Every 4″ portion of the bat should have its diameter measured. When turning the wood, the marks will act as a guide for the turner. From the knob to the tip of the barrel, these measures indicate 4 inch increments.
  • Two inches in diameter should be used
  • One inch in diameter for a 4″, one inch in diameter for an 8″, one inch in diameter for a 12″, one inch in diameter for a 16″, one inch in diameter for a 20″, one inch in diameter for an 18″, one inch in diameter for a 32″, one inch in diameter for a 36″, and one inch in diameter for a 48″.
  1. 1Input the blank into the alathe program. 2Set the tool rest after securing the blank in place with a spur center or other similar mounting device. An adjustable platform that stands in front of your spinning wood to support your tools while you cut, the tool rest may be adjusted to fit your needs. Position the tool rest so that it is only a few inches away from the widest point of the blank after it is finished cutting. The height of your lathe should be adjusted so that you are able to position your tool perpendicular to the spinning axis of the machine. 3 Start the lathe by turning the knob. Starting with the spinning of the wood, you may begin the cutting procedure. When dealing with tools and a lathe, it is important to exercise caution.
  • Always keep your gaze fixed on the piece of wood you are working with. Avoid using force when working with your tools
  • Instead, allow the spinning movement of the wood to do the work. Wearing eye protection is recommended.
  • 4 Make a cylinder out of the wood by rounding it out with a roughing gouge. Using a roughing gauge, you may produce a round, symmetrical surface by removing huge quantities of wood from the surface of a board. To transform a square piece of wood into a genuine cylinder, carefully remove the edges of the wood as you go along. Make certain that the wood is perfectly symmetrical
  • Otherwise, the wood may become unstable.
  • Make a shallow cut into the spinning wood with the gouge against the tool rest and gently slide it into the wood. Continue to hold the gouge firmly in both hands while maintaining complete focus on your job at all times
  • Using a slow, gliding motion, glide the gouge up and down the length of the wood to smooth it into a cylindrical shape. Each part of the wood should be marked every four inches, and the diameter of each section should be noted.
  • 5 To serve as a guide, make four-inch diameter incisions every four inches. To create a groove in the wood, use a parting tool to cut the groove. Removing a few millimeters at a time will ensure that you don’t take out too much material, and you will complete the depth for each piece. For each 4 inch area, cut each groove to the appropriate length by measuring it twice.
  • To begin, begin at the barrel end of the bat. Produce diameter cuts for the first 12 inches of the barrel’s circumference. Stopping periodically to verify the diameter of your groove with calipers is a good idea.
  • 6 Making use of a gouge, join the diameter cuts made along the first 12 inches of the barrel’s length. Remove the wood all the way down to the diameter cut that runs along the length of the bat. Slide the gouge down the highest area of the bat, removing the wood from around the diameter cut as it goes. Keep an eye on the wood while you’re removing it to make sure you don’t go any deeper than the diameter cut allows.
  • From the broadest point to the smallest point, work your way down. To join each section together, cut the wood down to the diameter of the cut along each segment.
  • 7 Remove any wood that has accumulated at the handle end of the bat. The roughing gouge should be used to reduce the wood on the handle end of the bat down to about 2 inches in width. Make a flat surface against the tool rest and move the chisel along the handle of a baseball bat.
  • Slightly move the chisel up and down the handle to narrow it
  • Remove wood from along the handle part until the diameter of the entire handle section reaches 2 inches in diameter
  • Stopping the lathe frequently to use calipers and verify your diameter is a good practice.
  • 8Make marks on the bat in four-inch intervals. Mark the handle end of the bat once again to use as a reference for where to trim the diameter of the bat. 9 Make four-inch-diameter cuts along the handle with a skew chisel, spaced four inches apart. Its sharp narrow tip allows you to carve a tiny groove to the necessary diameter using the skew chisel, which has a sharp narrow point. Cut a groove in the wood every four inches along the handle of the bat, just as you did when you made the barrel of the bat. Calipers may be used to measure the diameter of your grooves.
  • The grooves should be cut to the required diameter based on the specifications provided above.
  • 10Use the gouge chisel to connect the diameter grooves together. Begin at the barrel end of the bat and work your way toward the handle of the bat. Cut away the wood along each part to produce a flat surface that runs from one end of the bat to the other end of the bat. 11 Take the required bat length from the end of the barrel and multiply it by two. Make a mark on the ground where you want the bat to be the desired length. A bat’s length is usually 32 inches, which is considered conventional. The point at which you make your mark will be the point at which the knob of the bat begins.
  • Measure the bat using a measuring tape starting at the broad end of the barrel of the bat
  • The length of the bat should be marked to indicate where the handle finishes and the knob begins
  • 12 Construct the bat’s knob from scratch. Use a mixture of tools to shape the knob’s ends and round both ends of the knob to complete the construction. The knob is located at the bottom of the bat and is responsible for ensuring a proper grip during swinging.
  • To round off the top of the knob, use the skew chisel to round it off. The wood from the top of the knob where it joins to the handle needs to be removed. When fully extended, the knob will measure 2 inches in diameter at its widest point and will connect directly to the 1 inch diameter handle. Use the parting tool to remove enough wood from the knob to allow you to insert the skew chisel and round off the end. In order to round off the knob, you must first remove wood from the bottom of the bat in order to fit the skew chisel around the bottom of the bat. Create a rounded knob by smoothing the corners of the knob with the skew chisel to form a U shape
  • The handle should be blended into the rounded knob by use of the gouge.
  • 13 Examine the bat for any bumps. Remove the bat from the lathe and run your hands along the length of it to smooth it out. Check the bat’s surface for abnormalities or bumps to see if there are any.
  • Using the gouge, smooth over any lumps that may have formed. Maintain control of the handle while the bat is still being turned in order to guarantee that it is the proper thickness. If required, make adjustments to the handle’s thickness.
  • 14 Sand the bat with a fine grit. Using progressively finer grits of sandpaper, ensure that the whole surface of the bat is completely smooth.
  • Utilizing 60-80 grit sandpaper on the bat while it is still in its mounting position on the lathe, rough-sand the whole length of the bat
  • Sandpaper with increasing grits should be used to make the full length of the bat as smooth as possible: 120, 180, 220, 400 grits.
  1. 1 Using a varnish brush, coat the bat. Apply a stain on the bat with a cloth that has been soaked in the wood stain of your choosing. While the lathe is working, rub the stain into the bat to ensure uniform application.
  • To stain the bat, apply two coats of stain. Make sure to allow the bat to dry in between coats. You may also apply a lacquer finish to the bat to help keep the stain and surface of the bat looking good for longer.
  • 2Apply a thin layer of wax to the surface of the bat. To finish the surface of the bat, use a wax paste, such as Min-Wax paste. Using a bat, buff the wax on the surface of the lathe while it is operating. Making the tenons on either end of the bat smaller using a parting tool is a good idea. A tenon is the piece of wood that joins the bat to the rest of the wood on the lathe and allows the bat to rotate freely. Make it as tiny as possible without causing it to shatter.
  • Precisely align the separating tool with respect to the spinning bat
  • The tip of the parting tool should be inserted into the rotating bat located at the bottom of knob and uppermost section of the barrel. Reduce the diameter of the tenon to a quarter of an inch in size
  • 4 Take the bat out of the lathe and set it aside. Once the bat has been taken from the lathe, you may use a hacksaw to cut away the tenons that were attached to either end of the bat.
  • Your arms should be extended as you hold the baseball bat straight out in front of you. If you have difficulty grasping the bat, it is possible that the bat is too heavy for you.
  • 5 Finish the ends of the bat with your fingers. After removing the tenons from the ends of the bat, apply the finishing touches to the ends of the bat.
  • 5 Finish the ends of the bat with your hands. Following the removal of the tenons, apply the final touches to the ends of the bat.

Create a new question

  • Question What exactly is the purpose of the sand paper? The purpose of sandpaper is to smooth things out and remove any rough edges. The greater the grit level, the softer the surface. Question What is it about this product that prevents a bat from appearing sleeker and more polished? It has a polyurethane finish on it. It is available in both water-based and oil-based formulations, and you can get it at your local hardware shop. Question Is it possible to generate duplicate bats? Yes. Simply follow the steps outlined in the previous section to construct a bat. Question In the event that you choose to paint the bat rather than stain it, what should you do? If you want a solid color, you should dye the bat rather than stain it
  • Otherwise, you should stain it.

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  • Choose a piece of wood that is free of knots. In addition to causing weakness in the wood, knots may also be extremely harmful while spinning in a lathe. Work at a leisurely pace. Even if you take away additional wood, the wood that has already been taken cannot be replaced. Check your diameters using a caliper on a regular basis. It is not permissible to place your hand between the tool and the tool rest. You might end up hurting yourself.

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  • Maintain a strong grip on your instruments to prevent them from being yanked from your grasp by the rotating wood. Never make any adjustments to the tool rest or lathe while the lathe is turning
  • This is dangerous. Before taking any measurements using the calipers, turn off the lathe. When working with a lathe, it is essential to pay close attention to your task. Eye protection should be worn at all times to protect your eyes from flying wood fragments. Wear a face shield to protect your skin from any small pieces of wood that may be present.
See also:  What Is A Good Era In College Baseball

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About This Article

A circular blank of wood, a lathe, and several chisels to form the bat are required to begin the process of constructing a baseball bat. Summary of the ArticleX Depending on your requirements, the wood should be 37 inches long by 3 inches wide and made of one of the following types: ash for strength and flexibility, maple for power striking, or birch for a combination of the two. When you’re ready to start carving, you’ll use the lathe to rotate the wood as you carve out the shape of the bat with chisels in parts that have been measured out beforehand.

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Making a baseball bat is a satisfying experience. It’s a reasonably simple woodturning project that anyone can complete. After graduating from aluminum and composite bats, it is beneficial for young baseball players to refine their abilities with a traditional wood bat.

Step 1: Tools and Supplies

The equipment and supplies required include a 36″ wood bat blank and wood latheturning tools, among other things. Fine Japanese saw with square, outside calipers, sandpaper, oil/varnish finish

Step 2: Choosing the Wood

The first step is to locate a suitable blank of either hard maple or northern ash for the project. The rough dimensions should be roughly 3″ round and 36″ long in circumference. The straighter and tighter the grain is, the less likely it is to break when it is being used in a project. Material that has been graded for the purpose of creating bats is far superior to the material that may be found at your local hardwood store. You may discover a variety of useful resources on the internet. For those who cannot locate a round blank, a square blank in cross section might be used to begin the process.

Waste at both ends should be accommodated by making the blank about 3 inches longer than the final length.

Step 3: Marking the Center

Mark the center of the cylinder on both sides of the cylinder as the next step. If you have a center finder, you may make use of it. If not, a useful approach is to use a square to inscribe a right angle inside the circle if the circle is not perfectly round. Draw a line across the center of the square where the legs of the square join the circumference.

That line passes through the middle of the picture. Repeat the process after rotating the square 90 degrees, and the junction of those two lines will serve as the center of the square. Make a hole in the middle of the piece with an awl so that the centers may fit into it.

Step 4: Roughing Out the Blank

Place the blank on the lathe and turn it. Rather of using a live center at the tailstock, I prefer to utilize a steb center at the headstock. I position the bat such that the barrel is as near to the headstock as possible. I find it simpler to spin this way, and the machine appears to shake less, but if you place it with the barrel at the tailstock, the majority of the cuts are “downhill,” which is not what you want. Make a cylinder out of the blank, making sure it is at least 2.75″ in diameter along its length.

If you have a lathe that has the ability to vary the speed, 800 rpm is an excellent speed to use.

Step 5: Marking Out the Bat

In order to mark out the bat, I draw three-inch pencil lines every three inches on the blank, starting at the end of the handle and ending at the barrel. Simply holding a pencil up to the spinning blank will result in a clean line being drawn.

Step 6: Gauging the Depth

A parting tool is used to create a narrow channel in the barrel, starting at the end of the barrel. I leave the diameter of the cut at approximately 1/8 inch “larger than the final finished measurement I normally cut to depth the first three or four of these markings, working my way down from the barrel. In order to duplicate an existing bat, use the calipers to transfer the measurements from the original. Measure the existing bat with the calipers to determine the proper setting. Add about 1/16 of a percent “to the measurement in order to accommodate cutting and sanding Cut the blank with a separating chisel until the caliper can just barely fit through the hole in the center.

Step 7: Shaping the Barrel

I use the roughing gouge to remove the majority of the trash that accumulates between the depth cuts once again. At this point, I often increase the speed of the lathe to 1200-1600 rpm. When cutting the barrel, I concentrate on the back of the profile of the barrel in order to maintain a proper curvature between cuts. After that, I use a skew gouge to smooth the surface of the wood. While I’m describing the tools I prefer to use, it should be noted that other turning tools may be used just as well.

This enables me to obtain a decent surface before the bat becomes too whippy on the lathe, which saves time.

Step 8: Shaping the Handle and Knob

Continue to use the parting tool to indicate the right depth of the cuts for the remainder of the project. Make a fairing curve between the channels cut with the parting gouge by using the spindle gouge or the skew chisel, depending from your preference. The forms and sizes of knobs vary significantly and are just a matter of personal choice; they have no bearing on the overall performance.

Step 9: Supporting the Center

The most difficult component of turning a bat is that, down towards the handle, a bat is rather thin in comparison to its overall length, making it difficult to turn. You will notice that the bat will vibrate as you begin cutting towards the handle, causing the tool to bounce and leave spiral chatter marks. The first step is to ensure that all of your tools are as sharp as they can be. The second step is to devise a strategy for supporting the stock in the center of the market. For the expert turner, the most effective and convenient method is to place your hand just behind the cut and support it.

Support from behind is the most adaptable and effective approach to minimize chatter marks, but it may be a bit intimidating for the newcomer. You may use a store purchased or shop constructed steady to do this.

Step 10: Sanding the Bat

There are varied quantities of sanding required depending on the condition of the surface and the fairness of the curve. For rough surfaces and profiles that are not entirely smooth, you should start with an 80-grit sandpaper and work your way up. Using a tiny piece of wood to support the sandpaper will assist to smooth out the contour and prevent the defects from becoming worse. This will ensure that you are not just polishing the peaks and valleys of the shape. You can begin sanding with 100 or 120 grit sandpaper when the surface has been improved.

Step 11: Applying Finish

I’ve discovered that a combination of oil and varnish provides the greatest finish. These sorts of finishes can be purchased at a hardware shop or created by mixing your own ingredients. While the bat is still placed on the lathe, I normally apply a couple of coats of finish to protect it. I fill a towel halfway with the concoction and hold it up to the spinning bat to absorb the excess.

Step 12: Trimming the Ends

I use the skew chisel, which is held vertically, to make extremely clean cuts on the end grain of the lumber. Immediately prior to making these cuts, I sharpen my skew. If you’re using a gouge or a scarping tool, exercise caution here since it’s very hard to wipe out the markings left in the end grain once you’ve finished. After that, I use a parting chisel to clear some space and leave a shoulder for the saw to ride on top of. My first step was to trim the protrusion at the top of the barrel to about an inch across (I’m going to hollow out that end of the bat), and then I took off approximately 1/4″ of the end at the handle (to leave as little as possible that I have to sand).

Step 13: Hollowing the End

Most bats these days have a little hollow at the end of their wings, although this is completely optional. You may just leave the end slightly convex and sand it when you remove it from the lathe to achieve the desired result. Because I’ve created a large number of them, I’ve constructed a jig to hold the bats upright as I hollow out the end of the bats. I use a 1/2 spiral upcut bit and a template bushing to guide the router through the process. Then, using a 1.25-inch round nose bit, cut a circle template into the end of the bat, and follow the path of the circle template.

Step 14: Engraving the Bat

If you have access to a laser cutter, you can really make the bat stand out from the crowd. I install it on a rotating mechanism on the laser cutter and use the laser cutter to carve out anything the player desires. In order to achieve a cleaner cut, I wrap the area to be cut with blue masking tape before starting the engaving process. If you don’t have access to a laser cutter, you may make logos and names on the bat with a wood burner or by painting them on with acrylic paint. Labels are customarily affixed on the face grain of the bat, and the player is instructed not to strike the ball on the label when using the bat (or 180 degrees opposite).

In order to determine if it moves further or breaks more frequently in one way than the other, Mythbusters should investigate this.

Step 15: Finishing the Bat

The final step is to apply additional finish. At this point, I often wet sand the finish with 400 grit sandpaper and apply as many coatings as my patience or children will allow until one of them wants to pull it out and bash it with a sledgehammer.

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Make Your Own Baseball Batby Jack MastenNorth Creek, NYWhat does a retired Industrial Arts Teacher give his 15 year old grandson for a gift? Seeing that he is the starting catcher on hishigh school baseball team, why not make him a baseball bat from Northern White Ash.

Materials and tools will be required.

  • A Northern White Ash 3″ x 3″ x 36″ long
  • A lathe
  • Roughing gouge
  • Parting tool
  • Spindle gouge
  • A skew
  • A band saw
  • Finishing supplies
  • A caliper
  • A ruler, pencil, paper, and hardboard
  • One grandson (seen)

My idea to make a wooden baseball bat for my grandson came to me one day. Tim first approached me when I was having a conversation with a buddy about the baseball bats that Major Leaguers were using at the time of his visit. When I was growing up and playing baseball for the Basloe Dodgers in Herkimer, New York, virtually all of the bats available were made of Northern White Ash. Today, almost all of the bats available are made of Western Red Cedar. This was the case for many years until someone came up with the brilliant idea that Maple would make an excellent bat.

  1. The majority of them, though, are Maple, not Ash.
  2. A chunk of this wood was made available to me by a friend who owns a band saw mill, but practically any reputable hardwood vendor could provide you with this material.
  3. 2.
  4. In my case, I used a bat that was appropriate for a high school performance.
  5. Cut out the form with a band saw or a hand-held jig saw, preserving the negative area to be used to verify the turned piece once it has been cut out.
  6. On both ends of the stock, draw a pencil line from corner to corner from one end to the other.
  7. Make a small hole at the junction of your lines on both ends, and then close the hole.
  8. Position the band saw so that the corners are cut at a 45-degree angle.
  9. 6) Insert the live center into one end of the stock and put the stock on the lathe, securing the tail stock, and turning at 600 rpm.
Step 7:Turn the piece using your roughing gouge.
7. Using your roughing gouge, turn the piece until it runs smooth and is round to 2″ diameter for the length of the stock. At this time turn the speed up to 1200 rpm.8. Following the pattern, layout and using the parting tool and calipers, mark and cut the barrel of bat for 12″ length. Work the barrel on the live end of the lathe. From this point to the knob, following the pattern, lay out and using the parting tool and caliper, taper the stock to make the handle to about 1″ diameter. The knob size is optional, or cut to match your original plan.9. Using the spindle gouge, turn the stock to dimension. Use the negative portion of the pattern to check the shape of the turned areas on the bat.10. Sand the bat using 60 to 220 grit sandpaper. Apply one coat of shellac and rub out, then apply 2 coats of spar varnish.11. Design a label and Grandson’s name and paint onto the finished bat.


Jack Masten is a retired Industrial Arts Teacher. You can reach him by email [email protected] toWood Newsfront page Bookmark and Share

The Craft of Creating a Wooden Baseball Bat – Grainger KnowHow

It takes 25 miles south of Chicago for the crack of a hardwood bat to reverberate through the Pro Shop of the Homewood Bat Company in Homewood, Illinois, where the bats are made. Todd Pals, the company’s creator, stands beside the pro shop’s indoor batting cage, watching a customer try out one of the company’s handcrafted wooden bats. In the background, more than a hundred game-ready bats are hung on the wall, waiting to be tested. It is critical for players who pick Homewood to take a few swings in the showroom before making their final decision.

  • According to Todd, “a lot of our clients may have never even touched a wood bat before.” Although the models appear to be identical, there is a great deal of subtle variance amongst them.
  • The result of this approach is a bat that is uniquely their own.
  • Aside from that, there are a variety of barrel sizes to pick from.
  • ” Choosing the Proper Timber The foundation of a professional bat is made of high-quality timber.
  • “Getting the greatest wood possible is the first step in the production process,” Todd explains.
  • In fact, Todd adds that selecting the wood is the most time-consuming component of the production process.
  • In order to do this, Homewood draws its lumber from New England and southern Canada, where short growing seasons and abundant rainfall combine to produce straight, tight-grained timber.

“There has to be a large quantity of moisture in the wood for the bat to be able to bend in response to the shock,” he explains.

Todd checks the grain of a maple dowel that he has picked up.

“The weight is 87.8 ounces.” The machine will remove around two-thirds of that wood, resulting in a bat that is rather light in weight.” Bats that are lighter and more nimble have been increasingly popular among players in recent years.

To Todd, this lathe cuts the bat in a single pass and sands it on the way back to the workshop.

“After it’s been chopped, we take another look at it,” Todd explains.

When Todd points to a row of PVC pipes that have been filled with lacquer, he explains, “This method is fairly simple.” “We totally submerge the bat in the tube and then draw it out again.” The Major League Baseball permits just four colors on its bats, but players are free to use whatever two-tone combination they like.

  • After it has dried overnight, we will sand it down, add our sticker, and cover it with a second layer of lacquer.
  • After a final coat of lacquer has been applied, the bat will be placed back on a lathe and cupped.
  • Cupping allows us to employ a bigger, stronger piece of wood while also removing a little weight from one end of the piece, making it more swingable.” Homewood manufactures bats for players of all skill levels for the love of the game.
  • While the majority of high schools continue to use aluminum bats, wooden bat youth events are becoming increasingly popular.
  • It’s a more accurate measure of hitting skill.” The vast majority of Homewood’s bats are intended for use in the baseball industry.
  • “While most people think of baseball in terms of the Major Leagues, there are seven minor league affiliates for every Major League Baseball team, in addition to the independent leagues.
  • “And it is the players that are truly motivating us to achieve our goals.
  • This website makes no assurance that the information or references are complete or that they will remain up to date.

Readers who have particular queries should refer to the appropriate standards or get legal advice from a qualified professional.

How Wood Baseball Bats Are Made

Although the process of manufacturing a wooden bat can be time-consuming, we would be derelict if we did not highlight the most vital component of the process, which begins working long before we do. You need the proper piece of wood in order to make the greatest possible bat. The eastern half of the United States and Canada are home to a number of mills, all of which supply us with high-quality ash, birch, maple, and beech. It is necessary to harvest the trees and transport them to the mills, where they are cut (formed into rectangles), doweled (rounded out into cylinders), and dried (using a VAC/Kiln to achieve the proper moisture content levels).

After they have been dried, they are separated according to the straightness of their grain (the straighter the grain, the better), weight, and the presence of obvious flaws, and then graded.

Storage and preparation

Although the process of creating a wooden bat can be time-consuming, we would be derelict if we did not highlight the most vital component of the process, which begins working long before we do. You need the proper piece of wood in order to make the greatest bat possible. The eastern half of the United States and Canada are home to a number of mills, which supply us with high-quality ash, birch, maple, and beech timbers. It is necessary to harvest the trees and transport them to the mills, where they are cut (formed into rectangles), doweled (rounded out into cylinders), and dried (using a VAC/Kiln to achieve the right moisture content levels).

Following drying, they are separated by straightness of grain (the straighter the grain, the better), weight, and the presence of visible imperfections, and then graded appropriately.

The Custom Crafting Processing Begins

However, we would be negligent if we did not highlight the most vital aspect of the process, which gets to work long before we do. To get the greatest bat possible, you must start with the best piece of wood available. The eastern half of the United States and Canada are home to a number of mills, which supply us with high-quality ash, birch, maple, and beech woods. The trees are gathered and transported to mills where they are cut (formed into rectangles), doweled (rounded out into cylinders), and dried (using a VAC/Kiln to achieve the proper moisture content levels).

After they have been dried, they are separated by the straightness of their grain (the straighter the grain, the better), weight, and the presence of visible flaws, and then evaluated according to their quality. Then they are forwarded to us.

Sanding

The sanding station is where you will first see the high level of craftsmanship in our bats. Each bat is subjected to no fewer than six rounds of intense sanding to ensure that it is as smooth and pleasant as possible when it is finished. After the sixth cycle, the bat is “boned” in order to compress the grains and give it an additional “pop” and longer life span overall. After that, it is subjected to one more sanding cycle, which is referred to as the ” polish sand “, in order to get a good gloss.

Chopping

The ends of the product are removed at the cutting station, and you can nearly see the finished result. The only uncertainty is whether or not the bat in question will actually make it to the “finished” condition. Up to this point, it has been visually reviewed multiple times, and if any problems have been discovered, we have been made aware of them. However, just because some of them have been labeled as “blems” does not always imply that we will toss them away or turn them into firewood.

Blems

In addition to being divided into a dozen or so different categories (with our very finest being placed in theElitecategory), the blems are given the opportunity to test their mettle on the baseball field as well. However, all of them, including those that have been marked during the cutting process, are subjected to a sanding procedure to assure smoothness and safety before being placed in a separate section for sale under the heading “XX – Blemishes.” They are sold at great discounts with the express knowledge that they will not be expected to survive as long or function as well as our finished models, which are sold at full price.

Despite this, we have received several compliments on them from customers who have referred to them as the “perfect practice bats” or “batting cage bats.” And, even with the previously stated knowledge of quality, we provide a slight discount to those who purchase a large quantity of our blems.

Finishing

The “finishing” phase is the next step for those bats that have made it through the quality-control process thus far. Following labeling and possible cupping to make the end of the bat less end-heavy, the bat is delivered to the finish room, where it will be polished and finished to the customer’s requirements. In the finish room, the bat is stained in accordance with the choices provided by the buyer when the bat was originally put to their basket. (Despite all of the advantages we have received so far in our approach, this has been dubbed the “most thrilling” stage.

There are almost 1000 different color choices when you combine the colors of the handle, barrel, and logo/text.

(It also gives Viper bats a gleaming sheen that makes them appear almost as lovely as the distance you can see from them.) Sorry for the shameless plug, /endShamelessPlug.) As soon as the bat has dried fully, it is branded, laser etched with the customer’s unique writing if required (in which case additional stain and spray is applied), and then delivered to the shipping department.

Shipping

When the bat is ready, all that’s left is for the clever, enlightened, web-savvy folks up front to tenderly wrap the bats in their cozy, tight bags and take them away, escorted by teams of wild stallions, white doves, and a ceremonial procession, to their final destination.

Swing Hard, Hit Hard

This is our favorite portion, because it involves getting your bat, taking it out into the world, and doing havoc. You have our full support if you are holding one of our bats, regardless of whatever side you are playing for. You are also representing Team Viper, therefore we are rooting for you. As a result, go ahead and choose your ideal bat.

Interested In Making Your Own?

Check out Woodbillets.com if you’re a hobbyist who’s interested in building or just finishing your own bat. In that location, you will have access to both wood billets for cutting from scratch and pre-cut bats for finishing if you do not want to make your own bats. 2004-2021 Viper Bats, Inc. reserves the rights to the trademark American MadeCopyright Policy Regarding Personal Information

How to Make a Baseball Bat Nameplate

FIRST AND FOREMOST, ALWAYS ASK FOR ADULT HELP WHEN USING TOOLS YOU HAVE NEVER USED BEFORE. Don’t toss out that old wooden baseball bat just yet. Even as a nameplate, it has the potential to be a hit.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • Pencil and paper
  • Pencil and paper
  • Hobby knife
  • Coping saw for cutting out the letters
  • Wooden bat
  • Keyhole saw (for curved cuts) or ripsaw (for straight cuts)
  • Round and triangular files
  • Sandpaper
  • And a file stand.

WHAT YOU’LL DO

Step 1: Decide whether you want to utilize a straight or a curved cut for your project. When you cut the bat, you should lower the thickness of the bat by approximately half. This will result in a perfectly level surface. It will be necessary for the flat surface to be long enough to accommodate the name. Despite the fact that the flat surface will not be visible when done, sand it smooth. It will be easier to trace the name with the pencil if you do this first. Draw a template of your name on a piece of paper and cut it out with a hobby knife for Step 2.

  1. Step 3: Invert the template so that it is facing up.
  2. Place the inverted template on a flat surface and trace the name with a pencil.
  3. The coping saw blade should be set such that it cuts on the draw stroke in Step 5.
  4. Work slowly and carefully, being sure to maintain the saw blade parallel to the work.
  5. As soon as you’re satisfied with the letters, your bat nameplate will be finished.

It is important to note that you should only submit images of your project. We are unable to share any images that include people’s faces due to privacy regulations. Before submitting anything to a website, always get your parent’s permission first.

Baseball bat – Wikipedia

Baseball As America, a traveling exhibit by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, features four historically significant baseball bats on display. From left to right: Babe Ruth’s bat used to hit his 60th home run during the 1927 season, Roger Maristo’s bat used to hit his 61st home run during the 1961 season, Mark McGwire’s bat used to hit his 70th home run during the 1998 season, and Sammy Sosa’s bat used to hit his 66th home run during the same season. It is a smooth wooden or metal club that is used in the sport ofbaseball in order to strike the ball after it has been thrown by the pitcher.

Although traditionally, bats weighing up to 3 pounds (1.4 kg) were swung, currently, bats weighing 33 ounces (0.94 kg) are typical, with the highest weights ranging from 34 ounces (0.96 kg) to 36 ounces (0.98 kg) (1.0 kg).

Terminology

At the National Baseball Hall of Fame’s traveling exhibit “Baseball As America,” there are four historically noteworthy baseball bats to see. To the left are the bats that were used by Babe Ruth to hit his 60th home run in the 1927 season, the bat that was used by Roger Maristo to hit his 61st home run in 1961 season, the bat that was used by Mark McGwire to hit his 70th home run in 1998 season, and the bat that was used by Sammy Sosa to hit his 66th home run in the same season. It is a smooth wooden or metal club that is used in the sport ofbaseball in order to strike the ball after it has been pitched by the pitcher.

Its thickest component cannot be more than 2.75 inches (7.0 cm) in diameter and its length cannot be more than 42 inches (1.067 m).

History

The shape of the bat has evolved over time to become more sophisticated. Baseball hitters were known to mold or whittle their own bats by hand during the mid-19th century, resulting in a wide variety of forms, sizes, and weights. There were flat bats, round bats, short bats, and obese bats, to name a few variations. Earlier bats were known to be far heavier and bigger than the bats that are presently controlled. The forms of knives, as well as the patterns of their handles, were explored extensively during the nineteenth century.

Innovations

Emile Kinst was given Patent No. 430,388 on June 17, 1890 for a “better ball-bat.” The patent was for a “improved ball-bat.”

  • Emile Kinst received his patent for the ball-bat, sometimes known as the banana bat, on June 17, 1890. In order to be called a banana bat, the bat’s form is shaped like a banana. According to Kinst, the purpose of his invention is to “provide a ball-bat which shall produce a rotary or spinning motion of the ball in its flight to a greater degree than is possible with any present known form of ball-bat, and thus to make it more difficult to catch the ball, or if caught, hold it, and thus to further modify the conditions of the game.” The mushroom bat, invented by Spalding in 1906, is an example of this. The Spalding firm created a bigger baseball bat with a mushroom-shaped knob on the handle in response to the increased size of baseball bats in the 1900s. The WrightDitsons Lajoie baseball bat, as a result, allowed the hitter to achieve a more even distribution of weight across the whole length of the bat. This bat featured a standard-sized barrel, but it also had two knobs on the grip for more control. The lowest knob was located at the bottom of the handle, while the other knob was approximately two inches above the lowest knob on each side of the handle. Because the knob is located in the middle of the grip, this was created to allow for more space between the hands during playing. When hitters choked up on the bat, the second knob allowed a stronger grip with the mushroom-shaped handle
  • In 1990, Bruce Leinert had the concept of putting an axehandle on the baseball bat, which became a popular design feature. In 2007, he submitted a patent application for the ‘Axe Bat,’ and the bat began to be utilized in the collegiate and professional ranks over the next few years. Axe handled bats were used by the Marietta CollegePioneers baseball team to win the NCAA Division III World Series in 2012. Several Major League Baseballplayers, includingMookie Betts,Dustin Pedroia,George Springer,Kurt Suzuki, and Danby Swanson, have adopted the bat handle.

Materials and manufacture

Emile Kinst received a patent for the ball-bat, sometimes known as the banana bat, on June 17, 1890, in Montreal. The banana bat is so named because of the way it is formed. “The object of my invention is to provide a ball-bat which shall produce a rotary or spinning motion of the ball in its flight to an even greater degree than is possible with any present known form of ball-bat, and thus to make it more difficult to catch the ball or, if caught, to hold it, and thus to further modify the conditions of the game,” wrote Kinst, the bat’s inventor.

Spalding Company created a bigger baseball bat with a mushroom-shaped knob on the handle in the 1900s because baseball bats were becoming larger.

The lowest knob was located at the bottom of the handle, while the other knob was approximately two inches above the lowest knob on each side of the knob.

This also offered hitters an edge when they choked up on the bat, because the second knob allowed a stronger grip with the mushroom-shaped handle; in 1990, Bruce Leinert came up with the notion of placing an axehandle on a baseball bat; A patent application for the “Axe Bat” was submitted in 2007, and the bat began to be utilized in collegiate and professional baseball during the following years.

Many Major League Baseball players, includingMookie Betts,Dustin Pedroia,George Springer,Kurt Suzuki, andDansby Swanson, have adopted the axe handle as a bat handle, includingMookie Betts and Dustin Pedroia, who won the NCAA Division III World Series in 2012.

Environmental threat to ash wood

More than 50 million trees have been destroyed by theemerald ash borer, an alien beetle that was mistakenly introduced into the United States from Asia. It is now threatening the groves of ash trees in New York’s Adirondack Mountains that are used to create baseball bats. The beetle is likely able to survive in an environment that was previously too cold for it due to global temperature rise.

Regulations

More than 50 million trees have been destroyed by theemerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that was mistakenly introduced into the United States from Asia. It is now threatening the groves of ash trees in New York’s Adirondack Mountains, which are used to create baseballbats. The beetle is likely able to thrive in an environment that was previously too cold for it due to global temperature change, scientists believe.

  • The bat’s diameter cannot be greater than 2 +5 8inches (67 mm) when measured in relation to its breadth and length. Its “drop” (the difference between inches of length and ounces of weight) must be no greater than 3: In order to be legal, a bat measuring 34 inches (863.6mm) in length must weigh at least 31 ounces (880 g). The bat may be made of any safe solid uniform material
  • However, the National Federation of State High School Associationsrules specify that only “wood or non-wood” materials may be used in the construction of the bat. A BBCOR (Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution) bat must be utilized in order for an aluminum bat to be legally used in a game. This is because it has been discovered that when this ratio is exceeded, a pitcher loses his capacity to protect himself.

Depending on the league (such as Little Leaguebaseball), the bat may not be larger than 2 14 inches (57 mm) in diameter for players aged 12 and younger, or less. However, in many other leagues (such as the PONY League Baseball and the Cal Ripken League Baseball), the diameter of the bat cannot be greater than 2 + 3 4 inches (70 mm). There are restrictions on how much and where a baseball player can use a baseball bat while applyingpine tarto to the ball. Rule 1.10(c) of the Major League Baseball Rulebook states that it is not permitted to be more than 18 inches above the bottom handle.

In succeeding years, rules 1.10 and 6.06 were amended to better represent the objective of Major League Baseball, as demonstrated by the league president’s decision.

Rule 6.06 only applies to bats that have been captured “altered or tampered with in such a way that the distance factor is improved or that the baseball exhibits an unexpected reaction This includes bats that have been filled, have a flat surface, have been nailed, have been hollowed, have been grooved, or have been coated with a material such as paraffin, wax, or other similar substance.” There is no longer any reference of a “illegally hit ball” in the document.

In 2001, the Major League Baseball permitted the use of Gorilla Gold Grip Enhancer in major and minor league games as a replacement to pine tar, which was previously prohibited.

Care and maintenance

A baseball bat that was used in a game and autographed by Tony Gwynn Players might be quite fussy about the bats that they use. All of Ted Williams’ baseball bats were cleaned with alcohol every night, and he carried them to the post office for frequent weighings. According to him, “bats gather up moisture and dirt that is laying about on the ground,” and they can acquire an ounce or more in a relatively short period of time. He also took great care to ensure that his bats did not gather moisture and so acquire weight by storing them in humidors, one of which was located in the clubhouse and another which was transportable for use on the road.

His explanation was that the sawdust serves as a “buffer” between the bats and the rest of the environment, absorbing any moisture before it can permeate into the wood.

In addition to animal bones, other materials such as rolling pins, soda bottles, and the edge of a porcelain sink have been utilized as boning materials.

When it came to hardening his bats, Pete Rose had his own method. He would soak them in a vat of motor oil in his basement and then hang them up to dry.

Fungo bat

A fungo bat is a specifically constructed bat that is used for practice by baseball and softball coaches. There is no consensus on where the wordfungo() came from, although the Oxford English Dictionary thinks that it is derived from the Scottish fung, which means “to throw, toss, or fling.” A fungo is a baseball bat that is longer and lighter than a regular bat, and it has a lower diameter as well. In order to hit balls thrown into the air by the hitter, rather than pitched balls, the bat is built to do so.

During fielding practice, coaches hit a large number of balls, and the weight and length of the balls allow the coach to hit balls repeatedly with good precision.

See also

  • Baseball bats made of composite materials
  • Pink baseball bats
  • A list of baseball bat manufacturers
  • Cricket bats
  • Softball bats

References

  1. AbJenn Zambri. “Size Matters: The Top 10 “Biggest” Players in Major League Baseball History.” Bleacher Report is a sports news website. Beckham, Jeff (13 September 2015)
  2. Retrieved 13 September 2015
  3. (August 18, 2014). “Using an axe handle on a baseball bat gives you greater power and fewer injuries.” Wired.com. on the 31st of July, 2018, from McAuley, Grant (May 19, 2018). “The Braves’ Swanson has switched to an axe handle bat as his preferred weapon.” The Game 92.9 is a radio station that broadcasts games. Obtainable on July 31, 2018
  4. Jeff Passan is the author of this article (June 23, 2015). “Why Dustin Pedroia’s Axe Bat, Dustin Pedroia, may be instrumental in making the round handle obsolete.” Yahoo Sports is a sports news website. Accessed July 31, 2018
  5. AbPatterson, Brittany. “Baseball Bats Threatened by Invasive Beetle”. Retrieved July 31, 2018. Scientific American is a magazine dedicated to science and technology. Scientific American is a magazine dedicated to science and technology. Canadian Sports Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 3 (August 2008), p. 8 (Publication Mail Agreement40993003, Oakville, ON)
  6. “The Well Is Effectively Dead.” Retrieved on November 21, 2017. NPR.org, accessed September 20, 2010. Retrieved on September 13, 2015
  7. “MLB restricts use of several maple bats in lower leagues
  8. Safety concerns mentioned.” archive.li.com, September 11, 2012. Retrieved on September 13, 2015. The original version of this article was published on September 11, 2012. CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  9. Abcd”Wood science and how it applies to wooden baseball bats”.woodbat.org. Retrieved 14 July 2017. CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  10. “Wood bats – on which “side” should the ball’s impact be?”.baseball-fever.com. Retrieved14 July2017
  11. Abc”Safety testing for maple bats mandated”.baseball-fever.com. Retrieved13 September2015
  12. Abc”Wood bats – on which “side” should the ball’s impact be?”.baseball-fever.com. Major League Baseball is a professional baseball league in the United States. The following website was accessed on July 14, 2017: “Hitting with Wood”.woodbat.blogspot.com. 3rd of March, 2009. “Maple and Ash Baseball Bats May Strike Out,” according to a report published on July 14, 2017. NPR.org published an article on July 4, 2008, titled abc”Babe Ruth modified the design of bats to have a thinner handle,” retrieved on September 13, 2015. Review by a spokesman (Spokane, Washington). The Associated Press published an article on March 11, 1979, on page C5
  13. Brian Mann is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom. “A Beetle May Soon Strike Out Baseball’s Famous Ash Bats,” reports the New York Times. NPR.org is the official website of National Public Radio. “Official Baseball Rules” were retrieved on November 21, 2017. (PDF). Major League Baseball is a professional baseball league in the United States. 2012-05-07
  14. Retrieved 2012-05-07. Season 5 of Mythbusters features a “Corked Bat,” and the “National Collegiate Athletic Association Standard for Testing Baseball Bat Performance” (PDF) is available at acs.psu.edu as of October 30, 2006. Archived from the original on 10 December 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  15. “Baseball Rules Committee Focuses on Clarification of Bat Standards and Sportsmanship During Pre-Game Practice”Archived from the original on 24 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  16. “NCHSAA Baseball Rules Committee Focuses on Clarification of Bat Standards and Sportsmanship During Pre-Game Practice”Archived from the original on 24 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  17. “NCHSAA Baseball Rules Committee Focuses on Clarification of Bat Standards and Archived from the original on July 6, 2010, via the Wayback Machine
  18. 2007 RegulationRule ChangesArchivedSeptember 26, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  19. “2017 Rules and Regulations for PONY Baseball” (PDF).bsbproduction.s3.amazonaws.com. “2017 Rules and Regulations for PONY Baseball” (PDF).bsbproduction.s3.amazonaws.com. Obtainable on July 14, 2017
  20. Dana Heiss Grodin and Heiss Grodin (March 7, 2001). “Equipment and product information.” According to USA Today. The original version of this article was published on March 4, 2016. Sandra L. Lee is the author of this work (December 27, 2001). “For the time being, the mansion is still standing.” Lewiston Morning Tribune, p. 1A. Lewiston, Maine. Obtainable on November 7, 2012

External links

  • “Size Matters: The Top 10 “Biggest” Players in Major League Baseball History.” Blacher Report is an online publication that covers sports and entertainment. Burton, Jeff
  • Beckham, Jeff (13 September 2015)
  • (August 18, 2014). “Using an axe handle on a baseball bat gives you greater power and less injuries.” Wired.com. Grant McAuley’s retrieved on July 31, 2018
  • (May 19, 2018). “Braves’ Swanson’s new preferred weapon is an axe-handled bat.” The Game 92.9 is a radio station broadcasting in the United States and internationally. on the 31st of July, 2018
  • Jeff Passan’s name is Passan. He is a lawyer (June 23, 2015). What Dustin Pedroia’s Axe Bat may do to make the round handle obsolete is explained in this article. Sporting News on Yahoo! “Baseball Bats Threatened by Invasive Beetle,” according to Patterson, Brittany. Retrieved July 31, 2018. Scientific American is a magazine that publishes research and analysis on scientific subjects. Scientific American is a magazine that publishes research and analysis on scientific subjects. Canadian Sports Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 3 (August 2008), p. 8 (Publication Mail Agreement40993003, Oakville, ON)
  • “The Well Is Effectively Dead”. Retrieved on November 21, 2017. NPR.org published an article on September 20, 2010 about the importance of education. “MLB restricts use of several maple bats in lower leagues
  • Safety concerns mentioned,” archive.li, September 11, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2015. On September 11, 2012, the original version was archived. CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  • Abcd”Wood science and how it applies to wooden baseball bats”.woodbat.org. Archived from the original on July 14, 2017. On September 13, 2015, Baseball Fever published “Wood Bats – On Which “Side” Should the Ball’s Impact Be?” on their website. On July 14, 2017, they published “Safety Tests for Maple Bats Mandated.” On September 13, 2015, Baseball Fever published a blog post entitled “Wood Bats – On Which “Side” Should the Ball’s Impact Be?” on their website. Major League Baseball is a professional baseball league in the United States that competes against other professional baseball leagues. “Hitting with Wood”, woodbat.blogspot.com, retrieved on July 14, 2017. “Hitting with Wood”. 3.03.2009 – The third of March. “Maple and Ash Baseball Bats May Strike Out,” according to the article published on July 14, 2017. NPR.org published an article on July 4, 2008, entitled Babe Ruth modified the design of bats to include a thinner handle, which was published on September 13, 2015. Reviewed by a spokesman (Spokane, Washington). Page C5 of the March 11, 1979, edition of the Associated Press. The author, Brian Mann, has written a book on his experiences in the military. “Baseball’s fabled ash bats may be struck out by a beetle soon.” Listen to NPR online at NPR.org. The “Official Baseball Rules” were published on November 21, 2017. (PDF). Major League Baseball is a professional baseball league in the United States that competes against other professional baseball leagues. This page was last modified on 7 May 2012. Season 5 of Mythbusters features a “Corked Bat,” and the “National Collegiate Athletic Association Standard for Testing Baseball Bat Performance” (PDF) is available at acs.psu.edu. Baseball Rules Committee Focuses on Clarification of Bat Standards and Sportsmanship During Pre-Game Practice”Archived24 May 2008 at theWayback Machine
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Baseball Rules Committee Focuses on Clarification of Bat Standards and Sportsmanship During Pre-Game Practice”Archived10 December 2008 at theWayback Machine
  • National Collegiate Athletic Association Baseball Rules Committee Focuses on Clarification of Bat Standards and Sportsmanship During Pre-Game Practice”Archived24 May 2008 theWayback Machine (retrieved on July 6, 2010)
  • Accessed September 26, 2008, at theWayback Machine
  • “2017 Rules and Regulations for PONY Baseball” (PDF).bsbproduction.s3-amazonaws.com
  • “2007 RegulationRule Changes” (PDF).bsbproduction.s3-amazonaws.com
  • “2007 Rules and Regulations for PONY Baseball” (PDF). BSF Productions. It was retrieved on the 14th of July, 2017. Dana Heiss and Heiss Grodin (March 7, 2001). A guide to various pieces of equipment and products In the United States of America Today On March 4, 2016, the original version of this article was archived. Sandra L. Lee is a writer and editor who lives in the United Kingdom (December 27, 2001). “For the time being, the mansion is still there.” On page 1A of the Lewiston Morning Tribune: On November 7, 2012, I was able to retrieve

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