Who Has The Most Home Runs In Major League Baseball

All-Time MLB Home Runs List

With 762 home runs, Barry Bonds is the all-time leader in the major leagues. It’s one of the most prestigious, yet divisive, records in all of sports, and it’s still going strong. However, many baseball purists still regard Hank Aaron to be the actual “Home Run King,” despite the fact that Barry Bonds officially has more home runs than any other player in baseball history. No matter if you are willing to overlook some players’ suspected use of performance-enhancing drugs in the late ’90s and early ’00s, which resulted in some incredible home run totals, there is no doubt that every player on this list will long occupy a unique position in baseball history.

1. Barry Bonds – 762 home runs

He is the all-time leader in home runs for a career (762) and for a single season (48). Bonds, who is not in the Hall of Fame, is also the most valuable player in baseball history (73 in 2001). The seven-time MVP is also the all-time leader in walks (2,558) and has been the league’s top on-base percentage hitter on ten occasions during his career.

2. Hank Aaron – 755 home runs

Hammerin’ Hank hit 755 home runs in his career, never exceeding 50 in a single season and just four times finishing first in the Major League Baseball home run standings. The Alabama native was a picture of consistency, as he smashed at least 40 bombs in a season eight times, with a season high of 47 bombs in 1971.

3. Babe Ruth – 714 home runs

In a 14-year span from 1918 to 1931, the Sultan of Swat was by far the finest power hitter of his day, topping the majors in home runs 12 times during that span. Perhaps the most telling statistic about his domination is as follows: During the 1920 season, he hit 54 home runs, which was a single-season record at the time, more than the combined totals of the other 15 major league clubs.

4. Alex Rodriguez – 696 home runs

In addition to being a contentious character on this list, A-Rod experienced an outstanding mid-career surge in which he averaged 46 home runs per season during a nine-year span from 1999 to 2007. He had 613 home runs at the completion of the 2010 season (although still just 35 years old), but he only achieved 83 more because of injuries and suspensions throughout the next season.

5. Albert Pujols* – 677 home runs

With the exception of Miguel Cabrera, who became the 28th member of the 500-home run club on August 22, Pujols is the only active player on this list. Pujols was designated for assignment by the Angels on May 6, but he signed with the Dodgers shortly after and has continued to add to his impressive total despite receiving limited playing time. During his first decade in the majors, Pujols exploded onto the scene with 37 home runs as a rookie with the Cardinals in 2001, and he went on to smash at least 40 home runs on six other occasions during his career.

6. Willie Mays – 660 home runs

Mays is widely regarded as one of the finest all-around players in the history of the game.

He is a member of the Hall of Fame. In addition to hitting 660 home runs, he stole 338 bases (while leading the league in base stealers for four consecutive seasons from 1956 to 1959), scored 2,062 runs, and amassed 3,283 hits over his 16-year career.

7. Ken Griffey Jr. – 630 home runs

Rarely has a player experienced a five-year run as successful as Griffey’s from 1996 to 2000, during which time he averaged 50 home runs and 137 RBIs each season while batting. 290 points and a slugging average of 604 points While it looked like he might be on the verge of breaking the all-time record, he failed to hit 30 in a single season during his remaining six seasons in Major League Baseball.

8. Jim Thome — 612 home runs

The five-year span from 1996 to 2000, during which Griffey averaged 50 home runs and 137 RBIs while batting, was one of the most successful in baseball history. and slugging.604 on the other hand While it looked like he might be on the verge of breaking the all-time record, he failed to reach 30 in a single season during his remaining six seasons in baseball.

9. Sammy Sosa ­– 609 home runs

The five-year period from 1996 to 2000, during which Griffey averaged 50 home runs and 137 RBIs while batting, was one of the most successful in baseball history. 290 points and slugging.604 points Even though it seemed like he was going to flirt with the all-time mark, he failed to achieve 30 in a single season during his remaining six seasons in the majors.

10. Frank Robinson – 586 home runs

At age 20, Robinson became a major leaguer with the Cincinnati Reds, hitting 38 home runs and driving in a league-high 122 runs as a rookie. Robinson retired from baseball after the 1956 season. His power hitting continued to be among the best in the game for the following 15 years, albeit he only led the league in home runs on one occasion during that time (49 in 1966).

11. Mark McGwire – 583 home runs

Because of his probable participation with drugs, McGwire’s home run exploits may never be completely understood by the majority of baseball fans, but his stats are really remarkable. With 70 home runs in 1998, he shattered Roger Maris’ single-season home run record, and he backed it up with another 65 the next season. Three times, he hit at least 58 home runs in a season.

12. Harmon Killebrew – 573 home runs

Killebrew was a traditional slugger who struck out a lot and never had a high batting average. During a 12-year span in the late 1950s and early 1960s, he hit at least 40 home runs on eight different occasions. Killer’s 393 home runs in the 1960s were the most by any player in the era.

13. Rafael Palmeiro – 569 home runs

Palmeiro, the third player on this list to be affiliated with the drug era, averaged 41 home runs and 121 RBIs each season from 1995 to 2003 while playing for Baltimore (four years) and Texas (four years) (five years). In his first season in Texas, he hit.324 with 47 home runs and 148 RBIs, stats that were comparable to those of a triple crown winner.

14. Reggie Jackson – 563 home runs

Mr. October was most known for his playoff exploits, but he was also a productive player from April through September, hitting 30 or more home runs seven seasons over a 21-year career that included appearances with the A’s (twice), Orioles, Yankees, and Angels, among other teams.

15. Manny Ramirez – 555 home runs

During his peak, Ramirez was regarded as one of the most fearsome hitters in baseball.

From 1998 through 2008, the mysterious slugger had a successful career. 318 hits a season, with an average of 38 home runs, 123 RBIs, and 101 runs scored. He was an integral part of the Red Sox’s unforgettable 2004 World Series championship squad.

16. Mike Schmidt – 548 home runs

Schmidt, who is widely regarded as the greatest third baseman in history, led the National League in home runs eight times during a 15-year period. He spent his whole 18-year career with the Phillies, and he was voted the National League MVP on three separate times.

17. David Ortiz – 541 home runs

“Big Papi” was a late bloomer who didn’t break out as a major-league power hitter until his late 20s, when he was signed by the Red Sox following an unremarkable six-year stint with the Minnesota Twins. Ortiz led the league in home runs with 54 in 2006, and he will be recognized as one of the most beloved Red Sox players of all time when his career comes to a close.

18. Mickey Mantle – 536 home runs

Few players were as good as the Mick when he was at his peak – sadly, that peak only lasted around 10 years, owing in large part to injuries. During a six-year span (1955-60), he led the American League in home runs four times and hit a career-high 54 in 1961, when he finished second to teammate Roger Maris in the category (61).

19. Jimmie Foxx – 534 home runs

Foxx is perhaps one of the most unappreciated sluggers in the history of the game. When he hit a combined 106 home runs with 332 RBIs in 1932-33, he slugged an incredible.726 with a 1.186 on-base percentage, he was undoubtedly the best player not named Babe Ruth in the history of the game (excluding Babe Ruth).

20t. Willie McCovey – 521 home runs

Throughout the 1960s, McCovey was regarded as one of the game’s top first basemen. He was the league’s leading home run hitter three times, with his best season coming in 1969, when he hit.320 with 45 home runs and 126 RBIs to win the MVP award.

20t. Frank Thomas – 521 home runs

The Big Hurt hit at least 40 home runs in five different seasons, yet he never finished first in the league in any of those seasons. During his 19-year career, he was more than just a power hitter; he was also an on-base monster, leading the league in walks and on-base percentage four times during his tenure with the Mets.

20t. Ted Williams – 521 home runs

Williams, widely regarded as the greatest pure hitter in baseball history, put up some astounding numbers over his first ten seasons in the majors, despite the fact that he was absent for three seasons while serving in the military. The following are some of his most notable accomplishments: he has hit for the Triple Crown twice, has led the league in runs scored for five consecutive seasons (during which he has played), has led the league in walks eight times, and is the all-time leader in on-base percentage in the major leagues (.482).

23t. Ernie Banks – 512 home runs

When it came to baseball in the late 1950s, Banks was perhaps the finest player in the game, collecting back-to-back National League MVP Awards in 1958 and 1959 while playing the difficult position of shortstop. During that span, he hit a total of 92 home runs and drove in a total of 272 runs while leading the league in games played in both seasons.

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23t. Eddie Mathews – 512 home runs

He was a reliable power bat for the Milwaukee Braves from the 1950s and into the 1960s, hitting at least 30 home runs in nine consecutive seasons during that time period.

He was the league’s leading scorer twice, with 47 in 1953 and 46 in 1959, and he was selected to 12 All-Star games.

25. Mel Ott – 511 home runs

There were only two players in the 1930s who hit more home runs than Ott (308), and they were Jimmie Foxx (415) and Lou Gehrig (347). Despite never hitting more than 38 home runs in a season, he was the best in the league five times throughout that decade (though he did hit 42 in 1929). *Player who is still active, with statistics up to and including August 22, 2021.

This is each position’s top home run hitter

Throughout history, different jobs have been associated with varying levels of power expectations. When you look at the all-time home run leaders at each position on the diamond, you can see what I mean. For example, Babe Ruth hit 714 home runs throughout his career, but he isn’t the most valuable right fielder in the league now. Meanwhile, numerous players rank top in their respective positions despite having hit fewer than 450 home runs. You’ll discover the top home run hitters for each position listed below.

  1. Any player who spent at least two-thirds of his career in the outfield (regardless of the precise outfield position he played) was eligible for the position in the outfield where he spent the most of his time.
  2. Piazza had nine seasons in which he hit at least 30 home runs, more than double the number of any other catcher in the majors, and his personal best was 40, which he achieved twice (1997 and 1998), more than double the total of any other catcher.
  3. Piazza also hit 18 home runs as a designated hitter, eight home runs as a first baseman, and five home runs as a pinch hitter throughout his MLB career.
  4. Pujols, the sole active positional home run leader, with 679 home runs in 21 seasons in the Majors, which is the most in the Majors since Barry Bonds.
  5. Pujols, on the other hand, is second in the majors in terms of home runs hit by a first baseman (476), after only Mark McGwire (501).
  6. Pujols has smashed 105 home runs as a designated hitter, 64 as a left fielder, 24 as a third baseman, six as a right fielder, and four as a pinch hitter throughout his major league career.
  7. Jeff Kent is at second base with a 377 batting average.

Kent is in first place with 377 points, having achieved 20 or more points on 12 occasions.

Canó is a dynamic leader (334) Mike Schmidt is on third base with a 548 batting average.

He won his first MVP Award in 1980 after hitting a career-high 48 home runs.

Schmidt retired after his last season in 1989, having hit 548 home runs in his professional baseball career.

Apart from owning the record for the most continuous games played streak (2,632 games), Ripken is a member of the 3,000-hit club and has 431 home runs to his credit throughout his 21-year professional career.

Marcus Semien is a dynamic leader (160) Barry Bonds has 762 hits in left field.

The legendary slugger blasted 40 or more home runs eight times, including a single-season high of 73 in 2001, on his way to a career high of 762 home runs.

Justin Upton is a dynamic leader (324) Willie Mays (660) is the center fielder.

He hit 660 home runs in his 22-year career, which was the most by a center fielder at the time.

came dangerously close to reaching that number, but finally fell short, finishing with 630 points.

Two of the three batters in MLB history who have hit more than 700 home runs, Aaron and Babe Ruth, were right fielders who spent the most of their careers there.

Aaron finished his career with 755 long balls, which he held until Bonds eclipsed his total in 2007 to become the all-time leader.

Aaron hit 520 home runs in right field, 68 in left field, 64 in center field, 61 at first base, 22 as a designated hitter, six in second base, and three as a pinch hitter throughout his major league career.

While Edgar Martinez is the man most closely identified with the designated-hitter position, Ortiz is the guy with the most home runs in the position by a significant margin, according to Baseball Reference.

Ortiz became the first player in history to hit 500 home runs in 2015, and he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in the 2022 election cycle.

When he was younger, Ferrell was an above-average innings eater, averaging 266 frames a season from 1929 through 1937 while compiling a 123 ERA+ during that time period.

Ferrell (38 home runs) has a slim lead over Bob Lemon (37), Red Ruffing (36), Earl Wilson (35) and Warren Spahn (35) in the all-time home run list among pitchers (35). Madison Bumgarner is a dynamic leader (19)

2021 MLB Team Hitting Stats

Regular SeasonMLBYear to DateSelect a Split for the 2021 Regular SeasonMLB

TEAM LEAGUE G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG OPS
1Toronto Blue JaysBlue Jays1‌‌‌ AL 162 5476 846 1455 285 13 262 816 496 1218 81 20 .266 .330 .466 .796
2San Francisco GiantsGiants2‌‌‌ NL 162 5462 804 1360 271 25 241 768 602 1461 66 14 .249 .329 .440 .769
3Atlanta BravesBraves3‌‌‌ NL 161 5363 790 1307 269 20 239 762 549 1453 59 19 .244 .319 .435 .754
4Los Angeles DodgersDodgers4‌‌‌ NL 162 5445 830 1330 247 24 237 799 613 1408 65 17 .244 .330 .429 .759
5Minnesota TwinsTwins5‌‌‌ AL 162 5431 729 1311 271 17 228 690 525 1405 54 15 .241 .314 .423 .737
6Cincinnati RedsReds6‌‌‌ NL 162 5423 786 1352 295 13 222 756 553 1425 36 24 .249 .328 .431 .759
6New York YankeesYankees6‌‌‌ AL 162 5331 711 1266 213 12 222 666 621 1482 63 18 .237 .322 .407 .729
6Tampa Bay RaysRays6‌‌‌ AL 162 5507 857 1336 288 36 222 810 585 1542 88 42 .243 .321 .429 .750
9Houston AstrosAstros9‌‌‌ AL 162 5593 863 1496 299 14 221 834 569 1222 53 16 .267 .339 .444 .783
10Boston Red SoxRed Sox10‌‌‌ AL 162 5495 829 1434 330 23 219 783 512 1386 40 21 .261 .328 .449 .777
11Chicago CubsCubs11‌‌‌ NL 162 5306 705 1255 225 26 210 672 502 1596 86 37 .237 .312 .407 .719
12Cleveland IndiansIndians12‌‌‌ AL 162 5332 717 1269 248 22 203 686 453 1387 109 17 .238 .303 .407 .710
13Oakland AthleticsAthletics13‌‌‌ AL 162 5395 743 1284 271 19 199 698 545 1349 88 20 .238 .317 .406 .723
13Seattle MarinersMariners13‌‌‌ AL 162 5355 697 1209 233 11 199 673 535 1492 64 24 .226 .303 .385 .688
15Philadelphia PhilliesPhillies15‌‌‌ NL 162 5366 734 1288 262 24 198 700 564 1402 77 19 .240 .318 .408 .726
15St. Louis CardinalsCardinals15‌‌‌ NL 162 5351 706 1303 261 22 198 678 478 1341 89 22 .244 .313 .412 .725
17Baltimore OriolesOrioles17‌‌‌ AL 162 5420 659 1296 266 15 195 632 451 1454 54 23 .239 .304 .402 .706
18Milwaukee BrewersBrewers18‌‌‌ NL 162 5362 738 1251 255 18 194 700 586 1465 82 21 .233 .317 .396 .713
19Chicago White SoxWhite Sox19‌‌‌ AL 162 5357 796 1373 275 22 190 757 586 1389 57 20 .256 .336 .422 .758
19Los Angeles AngelsAngels19‌‌‌ AL 162 5437 723 1331 265 23 190 691 464 1394 79 26 .245 .310 .407 .717
21Colorado RockiesRockies21‌‌‌ NL 161 5374 739 1338 275 34 182 709 491 1356 76 23 .249 .317 .414 .731
21Washington NationalsNationals21‌‌‌ NL 162 5385 724 1388 272 20 182 686 573 1303 56 26 .258 .337 .417 .754
23San Diego PadresPadres23‌‌‌ NL 162 5384 729 1305 273 21 180 695 586 1324 110 39 .242 .321 .401 .722
24Detroit TigersTigers24‌‌‌ AL 162 5376 697 1299 236 37 179 675 490 1514 88 25 .242 .308 .399 .707
25New York MetsMets25‌‌‌ NL 162 5210 636 1243 228 18 176 604 495 1392 54 26 .239 .315 .391 .706
26Texas RangersRangers26‌‌‌ AL 162 5405 625 1254 225 24 167 598 433 1381 106 29 .232 .294 .375 .669
27Kansas City RoyalsRoyals27‌‌‌ AL 162 5427 686 1349 251 29 163 647 421 1258 124 33 .249 .306 .396 .702
28Miami MarlinsMarlins28‌‌‌ NL 162 5348 623 1244 226 23 158 594 450 1553 106 29 .233 .298 .372 .670
29Arizona DiamondbacksD-backs29‌‌‌ NL 162 5489 679 1297 308 31 144 644 537 1465 43 16 .236 .309 .382 .691
30Pittsburgh PiratesPirates30‌‌‌ NL 162 5336 609 1261 240 35 124 570 529 1328 60 30 .236 .309 .364 .673

2021 MLB Stat Leaders

Batting Leaders Across the Board in Major League Baseball

BATTING AVERAGE AVG
1WSH/LAD .328
2OAK/CHC .326
3HOU .319
4WSH .313
5HOU .311
Complete Leaders
Home Runs HR
1KC 48
1TOR 48
3LAA 46
4TOR 45
5SD 42
Complete Leaders
RUNS BATTED IN RBI
1KC 121
2CHW 117
3TOR 116
4MIA/ATL 113
4BOS 113
Complete Leaders
Hits H
1WSH/LAD 195
2TOR 191
3TOR 188
4KC 184
5ATL 180
Complete Leaders
Stolen Bases SB
1MIA/OAK 47
2KC 40
3WSH/LAD 32
4BAL 30
4HOU/CLE 30
Complete Leaders

Pitching Leaders Across the Board in Major League Baseball

Wins W
1LAD 20
2STL 17
3LAD 16
3NYY 16
5WSH/LAD 15
Complete Leaders
EARNED RUN AVERAGE ERA
1MIL 2.43
2WSH/LAD 2.46
3LAD 2.47
4MIL 2.56
5PHI 2.78
Complete Leaders
Saves SV
1SD 39
2CHW 38
2LAD 38
4ATL 37
5LAA 34
Complete Leaders
Strikeouts K
1TOR 248
2PHI 247
3NYY 243
4WSH/LAD 236
5MIL 234
Complete Leaders
Quality Starts QS
1LAD 27
2TOR 23
2MIA 23
4STL 22
5PHI 20
Complete Leaders

The statistics are updated on a nightly basis. Player Information and Statistics

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Statistics for the team

ALL MLB
Team Batting
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MLB home run leaders

Home runs are defined in baseball as a hit that permits the hitter to go around the bases and safely return to his or her starting position. When a baseball is hit over the outfield fence without first touching the ground, it is referred to as a home run. Barry Bonds is the all-time leading home run hitter in Major League Baseball, with a total of 450 home runs. His career spans from 1986 through 2007, during which he played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the San Francisco Giants, and during which he set a major league record with 762 home runs.

  1. Because of this, it comes as a surprise that he has not yet been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, even though the San Francisco Giants elected him to their Wall of Fame and honored him by retiring the number 25 from their uniforms.
  2. Babe Ruth is one of baseball’s all-time greats.
  3. In his 14-year career in New York, the Yankees legend stands atop the team’s all-time home run leaderboard, having hit 659 home missiles during his 14-year tenure.
  4. 3 jersey retired in his honor, but he was also inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, despite only having played for the team for a very little period of time (five seasons).
  5. The player who appeared in the most games overall in the Major League Baseball was Pete Rose, who participated in 3,562 games over the course of a 23-year career.
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Most Home Runs in One Season?45 or More

HR Player/Team Year
73 Barry Bonds, San Francisco (N.L.) 2001
70 Mark McGwire, St. Louis (N.L.) 1998
66 Sammy Sosa, Chicago (N.L.) 1998
65 Mark McGwire, St. Louis (N.L.) 1999
64 Sammy Sosa, Chicago (N.L.) 2001
63 Sammy Sosa, Chicago (N.L.) 1999
61 Roger Maris, New York (A.L.) 1961
60 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1927
59 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1921
58 Jimmie Foxx, Philadelphia (A.L.) 1932
58 Hank Greenberg, Detroit (A.L.) 1938
58 Mark McGwire, Oakland (A.L.), St. Louis (N.L.) 1997
58 Ryan Howard, Philadelphia (N.L.) 2006
57 Luis Gonzalez. Arizona (N.L.) 2001
57 Alex Rodriguez, Texas (A.L.) 2002
56 Hack Wilson, Chicago (N.L.) 1930
56 Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle (A.L.) 1997
56 Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle (A.L.) 1998
54 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1920
54 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1928
54 Ralph Kiner, Pittsburgh (N.L.) 1949
54 Mickey Mantle, New York (A.L.) 1961
54 David Ortiz, Boston (A.L.) 2006
52 Mickey Mantle, New York (A.L.) 1956
52 Willie Mays, San Francisco (N.L.) 1965
52 George Foster, Cincinnati (N.L.) 1977
52 Mark McGwire, Oakland (A.L.) 1996
52 Alex Rodriguez, Texas (A.L.) 2001
52 Jim Thome, Cleveland (A.L.) 2002
51 Ralph Kiner, Pittsburgh (N.L.) 1947
51 John Mize, New York (N.L.) 1947
51 Willie Mays, New York (N.L.) 1955
51 Cecil Fielder (A.L.) 1990
51 Andruw Jones, Atlanta (N.L.) 2005
50 Jimmie Foxx, Boston (A.L.) 1938
50 Albert Belle, Cleveland (A.L.) 1995
50 Brady Anderson, Baltimore (A.L.) 1996
50 Sammy Sosa, Chicago (N.L.) 2000
50 Greg Vaughn, San Diego (N.L.) 1998
49 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1930
49 Lou Gehrig, New York (A.L.) 1934
49 Lou Gehrig, New York (A.L.) 1936
49 Ted Kluszewski, Cincinnati (N.L.) 1954
49 Willie Mays, San Francisco (N.L.) 1962
49 Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota (A.L.) 1964
49 Frank Robinson, Baltimore (A.L.) 1966
49 Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota (A.L.) 1969
49 Mark McGwire, Oakland (A.L.) 1987
49 Andre Dawson, Chicago (N.L.) 1987
49 Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle (A.L.) 1996
49 Larry Walker, Colorado (N.L.) 1997
49 Albert Belle, Chicago (A.L.) 1998
49 Barry Bonds, San Francisco (N.L.) 2000
49 Shawn Green, Los Angeles (N.L.) 2001
49 Todd Helton, Colorado (N.L.) 2001
49 Jim Thome, Cleveland (A.L.) 2001
49 Sammy Sosa, Chicago (N.L.) 2002
49 Albert Pujols, St. Louis (N.L.) 2006
48 Jimmie Foxx, Philadelphia (A.L.) 1933
48 Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota (A.L.) 1962
48 Frank Howard, Washington (A.L.) 1969
48 Willie Stargell, Pittsburgh (N.L.) 1971
48 Dave Kingman, Chicago (N.L.) 1979
48 Mike Schmidt, Philadelphia (N.L.) 1980
48 Albert Belle, Cleveland (A.L.) 1996
48 Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle (A.L.) 1999
48 Adrian Beltre, Los Angeles (N.L.) 2004
48 Alex Rodriguez, New York (A.L.) 2005
47 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1926
47 Ralph Kiner, Pittsburgh (N.L.) 1950
47 Ed Mathews, Milwaukee (N.L.) 1953
47 Ernie Banks, Chicago (N.L.) 1958
47 Willie Mays, San Francisco (N.L.) 1964
47 Hank Aaron, Atlanta (N.L.) 1971
47 Reggie Jackson, Oakland (A.L.) 1969
47 George Bell, Toronto (A.L.) 1987
47 Kevin Mitchell, San Francisco (N.L.) 1989
47 Andres Galarraga, Colorado (N.L.) 1996
47 Juan Gonzalez, Texas (A.L.) 1996
47 Rafael Palmeiro, Texas (A.L.) 1999
47 Jeff Bagwell, Houston (N.L.) 2000
47 Troy Glaus, Anaheim (A.L.) 2000
47 Rafael Palmeiro, Texas (A.L.) 2001
47 Alex Rodriguez, Texas (A.L.) 2003
47 Jim Thome, Philadelphia (N.L.) 2003
47 Albert Pujols, St. Louis (N.L.) 2004
47 David Ortiz, Boston (A.L.) 2005
46 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1924
46 Babe Ruth, New York, (A.L.) 1929
46 Babe Ruth, New York (A.L.) 1931
46 Lou Gehrig, New York (A.L.) 1931
46 Joe DiMaggio, New York (A.L.) 1937
46 Ed Mathews, Milwaukee (N.L.) 1959
46 Orlando Cepeda, San Francisco (N.L.) 1961
46 Jim Rice, Boston (A.L.) 1978
46 Juan Gonzalez, Texas (A.L.) 1993
46 Barry Bonds, San Francisco (N.L.) 1993
46 Jose Canseco, Toronto (A.L.) 1998
46 Vinnie Castilla, Colorado (N.L.) 1998
46 Barry Bonds, San Francisco (N.L.) 2002
46 Adam Dunn, Cincinnati (N.L.) 2004
46 Derrek Lee, Chicago (N.L.) 2005
46 Alfonso Soriano, Washington (N.L.) 2006
45 Ernie Banks, Chicago (N.L.) 1959
45 Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota (A.L.) 1963
45 Willie McCovey, San Francisco (N.L.) 1969
45 Johnny Bench, Cincinnati (N.L.) 1970
45 Gorman Thomas, Milwaukee (A.L.) 1979
45 Hank Aaron, Milwaukee (N.L.) 1962
45 Ken Griffey, Jr., Seattle (A.L.) 1993
45 Juan Gonzalez, Texas (A.L.) 1998
45 Manny Ramirez, Cleveland (A.L.) 1998
45 Chipper Jones, Atlanta (N.L.) 1999
45 Greg Vaughn, Cincinnati (N.L.) 1999
45 Barry Bonds, San Francisco (N.L.) 2003
45 Richie Sexson, Milwaukee (N.L.) 2003
45 Barry Bonds, San Francisco (N.L.) 2004
45 Manny Ramirez, Boston (A.L.) 2005
45 Lance Berkman, Houston (N.L.) 2006

Individual All-Time Hitting Leaders in Major League Baseball Baseball Concluding Remarks The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Longest home run ever: Farthest home run in MLB history, 2021

Andy Marlin is a sports reporter for USA TODAY Sports. What is the record for the longest home run ever hit in Major League Baseball history? Because to the advent of StatCast tracking in Major League Baseball, it is now easier than ever to estimate the distance traveled by home runs currently being hit. However, even at a period in which New York Yankees stars Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Judge are blasting bombs, they fall short of the record for the longest home run in Major League Baseball history.

When Babe Ruth, Mickey Mantle, and Josh Gibson batted baseballs, they did not benefit from technology that tracked how far they hit the ball.

The following list of the longest MLB home runs since the game’s inception is based on simple measurements, stadium dimensions, and first-hand accounts, among other things. Let’s take a look at the finest moonshots in Major League Baseball history, as well as the farthest home run ever hit.

Longest home run ever hit

To anybody who knows baseball, it should come as no surprise that the records for the farthest home run ever hit in the sport are a bit shaky. MLB history is replete with accounts of absolutely monster blasts, which we’ll go through in more detail below. However, the record for the longest home run ever recorded occurred during a Triple-A baseball game. Mile High Stadium was the site of the Denver Zephyrs’ game against the Buffalo Bisons on June 2, 1987. Joey Meyer shot a soaring home run that went an astounding 582 feet and is the longest home run ever captured on television, aided by the thin air, much like baseballs hit out of Coors Field today.

Joey Meyer, while playing for the Triple-A Denver Zephyrs in 1987, blasted this ball an incredible 582 feet into the air!

Longest MLB home runs

Baltimore, Maryland, United States; March 26, 2020; On what was meant to be opening day between the New York Yankees and the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park in Camden Yards, a fan snaps a snapshot of the Babe Ruth monument outside the main entrance gate, according to the Baltimore Sun. Recognized Photographer: Evan Habeeb/USA TODAY Sports If you look up the record for the longest home run ever hit, you’ll see the names Mickey Mantle and Babe Ruth, both of whom played for the New York Yankees.

Some of those who took part in the game, however, are skeptical of those assertions.

Giancarlo Stanton, Miami Marlins outfielder – 504 feet, Coors Field

There’s no denying that Stanton is the finest power hitter in Major League Baseball right now. Neither in terms of average home run distance, nor in terms of maximum exit velocity, he outdistances and outstrips everyone else in baseball. What is the longest home run that Giancarlo Stanton has ever hit in his career? It happened with the Miami Marlins in 2016, and it happened at Coors Field, which seemed fitting. If the Major League Baseball makes adjustments to the baseballs and the regulations are altered in a way that favors batters more, Stanton may surpass this milestone in 2022.

Nomar Mazara, Texas Rangers outfielder – 505 feet, Globe Life Park

Nomar Mazara, who was once considered one of the best prospects in baseball, hasn’t exactly lived up to the expectations. Mazara’s prospects of making an impact in the Major League Baseball are likely ended after being released by the Detroit Tigers in July.

But it all came together on June 21, 2018, when Mazara smacked a Reynaldo Lopez fastball into the bleachers from the right side of the plate. With a distance of 505 feet, it is the longest home run in the history of the StatCast.

Glenallen Hill, Chicago Cubs outfielder – 500+ feet, Wrigley Field

Glenallen Hill isn’t one of the most well-known names among those who have hit the farthest home runs in Major League Baseball history, according to our research. From 1989 through 2001, he did not appear in an All-Star Game and did not hit more than 28 home runs in a season at any point in his career. However, in May of 2000, Chicago’s outfielder hit a home run that no one who witnessed it will ever forget. It landed on the roof of a building across the street from Wrigley Field, after traveling around 500 feet, according to estimations.

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Jim Thome, Cleveland Guardians first baseman – 511 feet, Jacobs Field

A frozen rope is defined as follows: On July 3, 1999, Jim Thome hit a dinger that will be remembered for a long time. A 3-1 pitch in the second game of a doubleheader was smashed to left-center field by Thomas, who didn’t even have time to get the ball out of the stadium. After bouncing once on the concourse, it crashed to the ground and became a memento that would go down in baseball history.

Adam Dunn, Cincinnati Reds first baseman – 535 feet, Great American Ballpark

Over the course of his career, Adam Dunn hit 462 home runs, garnering him a reputation as one of the game’s most dangerous home run threats during his time. When the New York Yankees faced the Los Angeles Dodgers on Aug. 10, 2004, Dunn delivered a performance he’ll remember for the rest of his life. The baseball was sent into the air and landed with an estimated distance of 535 feet, making it the biggest home run ever hit at Great American Ball Park.

Willie Stargel, Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder – 535 feet, Olympic Stadium

Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder Willie Stargell on deck during the 1971 season at Three Rivers Stadium, taken in July 1971 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. Malcolm Emmons-USA TODAY Sports is required for this image. Willie Stargel is one of the Hall of Famers who is also widely regarded as one of the greatest power hitters in the history of Major League Baseball. The Pittsburgh Pirates icon hit 475 home runs in his career, but it was a 535-foot shot at Olympic Stadium that earned him a spot in our top-10 list.

Keep in mind that he was 38 years old at the time of the hit, which makes it much more astounding than the feats of others who came before him.

Reggie Jackson, Oakland Athletics outfielder – 539 feet, Tiger Stadium

There’s no dispute about who blasted the longest home run in the history of the MLB All-Star Game. In the 1971 Midsummer Classic, slugger Reggie Jackson hit Dock Ellis’ pitch so hard that it virtually flew out of Tiger Stadium, with the ball rebounding off the roof and everyone in the stadium just staring at it in stunned silence. According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, it was 539 feet long, making it one of the longest home runs ever hit in baseball history.

Mickey Mantle, New York Yankees outfielder – 565 feet, Griffith Stadium

Unknown date and place; United States; FILE PHOTO; Mickey Mantle, infielder for the New York Yankees, at the plate Malcolm Emmons-USA TODAY Sports is required for this image. Unsurprisingly, many of the home runs considered to be among the farthest ever hit are based on first-hand testimonies from the players themselves. According to Yankees publicist Red Patterson, on April 17, 1953, Hall of Famer Mickey Mantle was credited with a tape-measure bomb that went 565 feet and was credited to him.

The Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum has officially acknowledged it. This is even more astounding given that Mantle used a teammate’s bat to hit the home run.

Babe Ruth, Boston Red Sox outfielder – 550-587 feet, Plant Field

The 13th of May in the Bronx, New York, USA. Before a game between the New York Yankees and the New York Mets at Yankee Stadium, Jane Forbes Clark, head of the board of directors of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and president Jeff Idelson were presented with Babe Ruth’s hall of fame plaque by Jeff Idelson. Brad Penner of USA TODAY Sports is required for this image. Babe Ruth’s fame outstrips even some of the most devastating home runs he smacked throughout his legendary career. The Sultan of Swat is recognized with a slew of MLB records and memorable moments that will live on in baseball history.

He said it was the longest home run he had ever hit, thereby putting an end to any rumors about 600-foot blasts.

But it’s not too shabby for the King of Crash.

Josh Gibson, Homestead Grays catcher – 580 feet, Yankee Stadium

During the seventh inning stretch against the New York Yankees at PNC Park, stage performers from the Pittsburgh Opera production of “The Summer King,” an opera based on the life of negro league catcher Josh Gibson (not seen), sang God Bless America. April 23, 2017; Pittsburgh, PA, USA The Pirates came out on top 2-1. Required credit goes to Charles LeClaire of USA TODAY Sports. Josh Gibson, arguably the best power hitter in Major League Baseball history, is regarded as a baseball legend. A home run of 580 feet at Yankee Stadium is ascribed to Gibson, who was voted the best player in the Negro League in 1967.

A lot of people feel that if the Negro League were to be recognized as a “major league,” which won’t happen until 2020, Gibson’s home run would be more commonly recognized as the longest home run in history.

What was the longest home run of 2021 MLB season?

During the 2021 Major League Baseball season, none of the deepest home runs came close to breaking the record for the longest home run ever hit. However, some well-known sluggers, including some teammates, hit massive home runs that left everyone in the stadia simply admiring the baseball as it sailed out of the stadium.

Miguel Sanó, Minnesota Twins designated hitter – 495 feet, Fenway Park

Slugger Miguel Sanó of the Minnesota Twins has had a difficult start to his professional baseball career. Minnesota’s 6-foot-4 batter, who was named to the All-Star team in 2017, is more than capable of hitting one of the longest home runs in baseball history. In an August game against the Boston Red Sox, Sanó fired a 495-foot cannon into the Fenway Park crowd late into the night. We can only think how far the ball would have flown if this incident had occurred at Coors Field instead of Dodger Stadium.

Longest MLB home runs 2021

Here is a list of the deepest home runs hit during the 2021 Major League Baseball season, along with footage from MLB.com.

  • The following players have reached 486 feet at Coors Field: Tommy Pham of the San Diego Padres
  • Yermn Mercedes of the Chicago White Sox
  • Adam Duvall of the Atlanta Braves
  • Ronald Acua Jr. of the Atlanta Braves
  • Marcell Ozuna of the Atlanta Braves
  • Ryan McMahon of the Colorado Rockies
  • Adam Duvall

It should come as no surprise that Coors Field has been the site of five of the ten longest home homers ever hit. Because of the thin air, it is one of the most hitter-friendly MLB stadiums, since baseballs fly out of the stadium when they are hit. Interestingly, the Braves’ outfielders are responsible for four of the longest home runs in Major League Baseball in 2021. It’s worth noting that the hardest baseball hit in 2021 didn’t even make it out of the infield.

Giancarlo Stanton hit a ball off the bat at 122.2 mph this season for the New York Yankees, but the ball sailed straight into the glove of the second baseman, resulting in a double play and a run scoring opportunity.

MLB Batting Stats & MLB Batting Leaders

1 T. Turner LAD 148 646 595 195 107 34 3 28 77 32 5 41 110 .328 .375 .536 .911
2 Y. Gurriel HOU 143 605 530 169 83 31 0 15 81 1 1 59 68 .319 .383 .462 .845
3 J. Soto WSH 151 654 502 157 111 20 2 29 95 9 7 145 93 .313 .465 .534 .999
4 M. Brantley HOU 121 508 469 146 68 29 3 8 47 1 0 33 53 .311 .362 .437 .799
5 V. Guerrero Jr. TOR 161 698 604 188 123 29 1 48 111 4 1 86 110 .311 .401 .601 1.002
6 S. Marte NYM 120 526 467 145 89 27 3 12 55 47 5 43 99 .310 .383 .458 .841
7 B. Harper PHI 141 599 488 151 101 42 1 35 84 13 3 100 134 .309 .429 .615 1.044
8 N. Castellanos CIN 138 585 531 164 95 38 1 34 100 3 1 41 121 .309 .362 .576 .938
9 T. Anderson CWS 123 551 527 163 94 29 2 17 61 18 7 22 119 .309 .338 .469 .807
10 A. Frazier SEA 155 639 577 176 83 36 5 5 43 10 5 48 69 .305 .368 .411 .779
11 A. Riley ATL 160 662 590 179 91 33 1 33 107 0 1 52 168 .303 .367 .531 .898
12 B. Reynolds PIT 159 646 559 169 93 35 8 24 90 5 2 75 119 .302 .390 .522 .912
13 F. Freeman ATL 159 695 600 180 120 25 2 31 83 8 3 85 107 .300 .393 .503 .896
14 N. Lopez KC 151 565 497 149 78 21 6 2 43 22 1 49 74 .300 .365 .378 .743
15 B. Crawford SF 138 549 483 144 79 30 3 24 90 11 3 56 105 .298 .373 .522 .895
16 B. Bichette TOR 159 690 640 191 121 30 1 29 102 25 1 40 137 .298 .343 .484 .827
17 T. Hernández TOR 143 595 550 163 92 29 0 32 116 12 4 36 148 .296 .346 .524 .870
18 X. Bogaerts BOS 144 603 529 156 90 34 1 23 79 5 1 62 113 .295 .370 .493 .863
19 P. Goldschmidt STL 158 679 603 177 102 36 2 31 99 12 0 67 136 .294 .365 .514 .879
20 K. Tucker HOU 140 567 506 149 83 37 3 30 92 14 2 53 90 .294 .359 .557 .916
21 C. Mullins BAL 159 675 602 175 91 37 5 30 59 30 8 59 125 .291 .360 .518 .878
22 T. France SEA 152 650 571 166 85 32 1 18 73 0 0 46 106 .291 .368 .445 .813
23 J. Segura PHI 131 567 514 149 76 27 3 14 58 9 3 39 78 .290 .348 .436 .784
24 A. Verdugo BOS 146 604 544 157 88 32 2 13 63 6 2 51 96 .289 .351 .426 .777
25 A. Judge NYY 148 633 550 158 89 24 0 39 98 6 1 75 158 .287 .373 .544 .917

The letters G and PA stand for Games and Plate Appearances, respectively. AB- At-BatH- HitsR- Runs2B- Doubles3B- TriplesHR- Home RunsAB- At-BatH- HitsR- Runs RBI is an abbreviation for “runs batted in.” SB stands for Stolen Bases. CS stands for Caught Stealing. BB- WalksSO- Strikeouts BB- Walks AVG is an abbreviation for Batting Average. OBP is an abbreviation for On-Base Percentage. SLG is an abbreviation for Slugging Percentage. OBIP (On-Base + Slugging Percentage) is an acronym for On-Base + Slugging Percentage.

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