What Size Baseball Bat For 12 Year Old

What is the Right Size Baseball Bat?

The proper size baseball bat for your youngster depends on their height and weight. So many parents are perplexed by this topic that they end up purchasing the incorrect size bat. I’m confident that you’ve seen it. The most obvious example is a young child player around the age of ten who is lugging a 34-inch bat about with him. “It’s not too large for me!” he cries, just minutes after fumbling his way through a third strike attempt. It is much more frustrating for the parent who is watching their child.

Kids sometimes ask for a bat that is far larger than they require, and parents are eager to believe that their child is large and strong enough to handle a larger bat.

The basic thing is that we want young kids to be able to wield the bat with relative comfort.

While greater length and weight can assist a player go farther, this benefit will be rendered ineffective if the player is not making strong and consistent contact with the ball.

When buying a baseball bat for your youngster, consider the following factors: These charts should be of assistance.

Bat Length

Assign your youngster the task of grabbing a bat and holding it with the barrel on the floor. The handle should be able to reach him directly about his hip (but not to his waist). My youngster is around 56 inches tall and weighs approximately 70 pounds in the example above. He is moving up from a 29-inch bat to a 30-inch bat, which is consistent with the chart below. Of course, this is simply a general rule of thumb. Depending on his height and weight, a player may be stronger than the average youngster of his height and weight (but let’s not overstate how strong they are!).

Bat Weight

To be sure, the bat’s overall length is simply one part of the equation to consider. Despite the fact that you may have found the perfect size bat for your youngster, it may really be too hefty for him. Actually, determining the optimal bat weight is a little more difficult, and we should approach it differently based on the age of your child. For a basic rule of thumb (depending on age and either player height or weight), below is a chart.

Drop

You need also take into consideration the “drop” weight — which is the difference between the bat’s length (in inches) and its weight. This will make determining the optimal weight of the bat a little more challenging (in ounces). If a bat measures 30 inches in length and weighs 20 oz, it is classified as “drop 10′′ in length and weight (otherwise expressed as -10). Younger and smaller athletes will have a considerably larger drop, which is defined as a greater gap between their length in inches and their weight in oz.

As a youngster grows older, though, he or she becomes larger and stronger.

Here’s a chart that outlines a general rule of thumb for 2 5/8″ barrel bats (which are commonly used in travel ball competitions). Little League employs bats with a 2 1/4-inch barrel and a variety of drop limits.

Know the Rules!

Recognize that your league or tournament may have limitations on the number of drops that can be made. You could find that your Little League doesn’t allow a drop three. Additionally, before you buy in a bat, double-check with your tournament or league to ensure that the composition (alloy, aluminum, or composite) is permitted. If you look on their website, you should be able to find extremely detailed criteria — perhaps even a list of the brands and models that they permit.

Your Turn

If you don’t mind my asking, what additional questions do you have concerning choosing the optimal length and weight of your child’s baseball bat? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below! (This page has been seen 251,686 times, with 218 views today)

Best Bat For 12 Year Old

In addition to identifying the optimal length and weight of your child’s baseball bat, what additional questions do you have? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below! Thanks! There have been 251,686 visitors to this page. There have been 218 visits today.

What’s The Right Bat Size?

The proper bat drop and size for them was determined by polling hundreds of parents of 12-year-olds. It was a 31/21 that was the most popular size, followed by 30/20, 31/23, and 32/24 in that order.

What Bat Drop for 12 Year Old

There are a plethora of differing viewpoints on the appropriate bat drop for a 12-year-old. People who swing a drop 8 were equally satisfied with their swing weight, despite the fact that it was the most prevalent size (31/21 in this study). Given the fact that BBCOR bats are just around the corner, we recommend that most 12 year olds opt for a drop 8 bat as the appropriate drop. In terms of length, most drop 8 bats are available in sizes ranging from 30 to 32. We believe that a 31-inch drop 8 bat is the best choice for the average 12-year-old player (which would make it 23-ounces).

Comparison Chart

At the time of this writing, we have hit with the majority of 2020 USA and USSSA bats. Aside from the obvious color-up versions that could appear for the holidays, we don’t expect there will be any significant alterations to the landscape in the near future. USSSA no longer permits 13U to swing drop 10s or 14U to swing drop 10s or 8s, despite the fact that this does not directly effect the 12U age level. The drop 8 is the best choice if you want a bat that will last you more than a year in the 12U area and you plan on playing a lot of USSSA.

Best Bat For 12 Year Old

We have hit with every USSSA and USA bat with 12 year olds in order to determine which model is the greatest 12 year old bat. When it comes to bats, we believe that the average-sized 12 year old should get either the 31/23 2020 CF Zenor2020 Marucci CAT 8 drop 8for USSSA or the 31/23 Slugger Selectfor USA, and that they should seek for drop 8 bats in previous year’s models if they want to save money on their purchase. It was a simple decision when we discovered a $80 discount on a 2019 VELO drop 8 at the time of this writing.

Best Bat for 12 Year Old

What is the best bat for a 12-year-old?

SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE USSSA Size:29, 30 and 31 inches|Drop:8 |Bat Type:Two Piece Composite |Barrel Type:Composite |Price:$$$|Swing Weight:Balanced |Rating:4.8/5 |Models:WTDXUFX20, WTDXCBC20, WTDXCB520, WTDXC8Z20, WTDXCBZ20 |Features:Long Sweet Spot, Huge Barrel, Balanced Sw

Reasons to Buy

  • Exceptional performance
  • Arguably the best “Feel” in the business
  • Huge barrel
  • Little swing weight
  • A plethora of sizing options
  • Huge barrel
Reasons to Avoid

If you attend any major event in the USSSA 12 year old division, you will quickly discover that DeMarini’s CF is the greatest bat in the league. It controls over half of the USSSA market, and this figure rises even higher when the kids reach the peak of their competitive abilities between the ages of 10 and 13. In some respects, a 12-year-old baseball player represents the apex of youth baseball achievement. And DeMarini’s CF in a drop 8 is the king of the hill in terms of performance. Remember to ignore the naysayers and detractors.

  1. We have it on good authority that the break rate of the CF drop 10 is not particularly high, but it is not significantly higher than the break rate of a number of other two-piece composite bats.
  2. However, given the fact that the majority of bats in the two-piece composite land are in this area, we detect wallet sadness everywhere.
  3. It is possible that some big and accomplished hitters will prefer the drop 5 32 or 31-inch, while a few smaller players may prefer the 32/22.
  4. MORE: DeMarini CF Review for 2020

Best USA Bat for 12 Year Old

WTLBBSPB320, WTLUBS7B1020, WTLUBS7B520, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLUBS7B820, WTLBBSPB320, W Drop 5 is heavily loaded at the end, but Drops 10 and 8 are evenly distributed.

Reasons to Buy
  • Exceptional performance and player feedback
  • Fresh out of the packaging
  • BBCOR and USA drop 5 versions are very overloaded
  • The two-piece design provides a smooth feel.
Reasons to Avoid
  • It is not inexpensive. Drop 5 and BBCOR are both extremely overloaded. It’s possible that this bat is even more endloaded than individuals who prefer end loaded bats desire. There is no USSSA version.

Surprisingly, there are only four performance-type bats available in the drop 8 position. ) (Our recommendation for the ideal bat for a 12-year-old is a drop 8 in a 31 or 32). The Quatro Pro, Easton’s Alpha, and Easton’s ADV 360 are the three models in question. It’s a wonderful bat, especially in a drop 10, and the Quatro is a fantastic bat in 2019. However, the 2020 Quatro Pro drop 8 wasn’t a fan favorite, and at the time of this writing, we were having trouble finding the 2019 Quatro Pro drop 8 in stock.

Despite this, the Select receives the top rank not because it is the only one remaining, but because it is the best of the bunch.

It’s fresh out of the package, and we continue to feel that, at least for the time being, an aluminum barrel on a hybrid bat is the best option in the USA sector.

In addition to the same fantastic feel as a Prime or CF, a composite bat achieves peak performance from the very first swing—something composite bats do not appear to have mastered yet. MORE: Louisville Slugger Select Review for the 2020 Season

Best Cheap Bat for 12U

SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE 12UUSSSA BAT SPECIFICATIONS Sizes:29, 30, 31, 32-inch|Drop:8 |Bat Type:Single Piece Aluminum |Barrel Type:Aluminum |Price:$$ |Swing Weight:Light |Rating:4.6/5 |Models:US9V11, US9V5, UT9V10, US9V10, BB9V3, UT9V5, US9V10| Features: 29-inch drop, single-piece aluminum bat, aluminum barrel, light swing weight, Composite End Cap with a Longer Length

Reasons to Buy

  • It has a light swing in both the USSSA and the USA
  • BBCOR is available in 32.5 and 33.5
  • There are several lengths and drop sizes
  • It is a proven bat (this is at least the 7th iteration)
  • Inexpensive, as compared to other options
  • Long-lasting
Reasons to Avoid
  • There is a lack of barrel size, and user reviews are generally negative.

The difficulty in locating a low-cost drop 8 bat stems from the fact that bat producers are aware that only serious players purchase drop 8 bats. As a result, they exclusively produce high-performance bats in this niche, and their costs are rarely competitive. Because of this, finding a good price on an older drop 8 bat for a 12-year-old is the only true option to save money. When this article was written, we had located an excellent price on a Velo with drop 8 USSSA. However, depending on how long that lasts, you may be forced to go on your own quest for a while.

  1. If you want a straightforward transaction, check for last year’s models between September and November (or sometimes 2 years ago models).
  2. In fact, we’d nearly prefer it above the CF or Select options on our shortlist.
  3. No, we don’t believe so.
  4. It makes use of an expanded composite end cap to aid in making it swing light and making the barrel larger in diameter.
  5. MORE:Rawlings VELO Review for the 2019 Season

Top Bat for 12 Year Olds

The best bat for 12-year-olds SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE USSSA The following sizes are available:28, 29, 30, 31, 32-inch|Drop:8 |Bat Type:Single Piece Aluminum |Barrel Type:Aluminum |Price:$$$ |Swing Weight:Balanced |Rating:4.9/5 |Models:MSBC88, MSBYC78, MCBC8| Features:Anti-vibration knob, 8 wall thicknesses in barrel, Stiff Swing, and more.

Reasons to Buy
  • Fantastic performance
  • Very well received by users
  • Drop 8 is a monster of a game
  • The anti-vibration knob is effective
  • There are several different size options
  • The sweet spot is long.
Reasons to Avoid

There are a lot of folks who would rank the Marucci CAT 8 at the top of their list of favorite things. The drop 8 variant of this bat, in our opinion, is exceptional. Despite the fact that it is sacrosant, we believe the drop 10 lacks the necessary weight to really make this bat sing. However, if you are able to swing a drop 8 version—which most 12 year olds should be able to—a 31/23 or 32/24 Marucci CAT 8 USSSA is an excellent choice. We can’t suggest it to everyone, even if they weren’t planning on going for the CF in the first place.

A variable wall thickness in the barrel helps to lengthen the sweet spot while still maintaining the USSSA standard throughout the barrel’s length and creating a balanced feel.

If you haven’t yet tried your hand at a CAT 8 and are in the market for a drop 8, we suggest go for it. There’s also a good chance that it will be far less expensive than the two-piece composites on this list. MORE:2021 Marucci CAT 9 Review | We Touched Base with an Icon

The 2 problem with 12 year olds?

First and foremost, they grow, and they grow quickly in some cases. The average weight is 95 pounds, however the range of weights can be as small as 70 pounds or as large as 125 pounds or more. Follow our bat size guide and make your selection based on your weight. Second, their ability levels frequently differ significantly from one another. Perhaps more so than at any other time in history. That means that individuals who are significantly better than average hitters will benefit from adding an ounce or two to their arsenal.

At 12 years old, this is where we would recommend scaling based on the player’s size and skill level.

How much to Spend on an 12Us Bat

A majority of baseball players begin to pursue their sport seriously when they are 12 years old. Our experience has shown that this is the age at which a large number of children are willing to tell their parents that they don’t enjoy it enough and begin specializing in something else. It is also the age at which a large number of other children begin to play a significant amount of baseball. When it comes to baseball players that are passionate about their sport, paying a lot of money on a bat makes perfect sense.

In the case of a 12-year-old who will play 40 games this year, he should not spend more than $480 on bats.

Wood Bat for 12U

We believe that every 12U player should have a wood bat in his or her arsenal. We, on the other hand, believe that they should not be used at the plate. A wood bat will seldom provide you with the same level of skill, speed, and performance as an aluminum or composite bat. However, we enjoy the concept of using it for strength training and batting practice. In order to make the most of the tiny sweet spot on a wood bat, players must be more selective with their pitches and hit the sweet area of the barrel more frequently.

  • The great majority of 12u baseball players, in our experience, prefer a composite barrel over a traditional barrel.
  • In addition, the barrel profile of composites is often larger, and younger players seek as much plate coverage as possible on their composites.
  • If you decide to go with an aluminum barrel, we recommend that you seek for a two-piece (also known as a hybrid) aluminum barreled bat.
  • Since at least a few years, there haven’t been any significant adjustments to the leading fastpitch bat on the market.
  • A fantastic bat, the LXT Hyper has an excellent feel and a superb balance.

You can frequently get good bargains on this bat, especially because manufacturers are eager to clear excess inventory in preparation for the 2019 stock, which will be available soon. Amazon.com is a good place to check prices. Our Complete Review: Review of the 2017 Slugger LXT Hyper.

A Guide – How to Choose a Youth Baseball Bat based on Player’s Age or Level of Play

It should be straightforward, shouldn’t it? A baseball bat and a pair of batting gloves are all that your youngster requires to be productive on the offensive side of the baseball field. Choosing the greatest baseball bat, on the other hand, might be difficult. This quick-start guide will offer parents and children with all of the information they need to make an informed decision about which metal bat to use for a specific age group or level of competition. Having a perfectly-tailored bat may help a player improve his or her performance while also considerably increasing his or her confidence.

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NOTE: Let’s be honest, how much do professional baseball players (who, presumably, use wood bats) know about the latest metal bats on the market?

Please keep in mind that David Morgan of ThePlanetOfBaseball.com generously contributed this piece to PBI.

Regulations

If it were so easy, everyone would do it. For offensive production in baseball, all your youngster requires is a baseball bat and a pair of batting gloves. Finding the perfect baseball bat, on the other hand, might be a difficult process. This quick-start guide will offer parents and children with all of the information they need to make an informed decision about which metal bat to use for a certain age or level of competition. In addition to increasing the player’s performance, having a perfectly-tailored bat may also help him gain more confidence.

Please keep in mind that professional baseball players (who, presumably, use wood bats) are unlikely to be familiar with the most up-to-date metal bat technology.

Please keep in mind that David Morgan, of ThePlanetOfBaseball.com, generously gave this piece to PBI on his blog.

  1. It is important to note that in the world of baseball, a “adult” is defined as someone who is at least 13 years old
  2. You should also be aware that BBCOR certification is the current standard utilized when manufacturing baseball bats for adults (those aged 13 and up). Make certain that the bat is BBCOR approved before using it in NFHS or NCAA leagues
  3. Otherwise, you will not be able to play.

It is important to note that in the world of baseball, a “adult” is defined as someone who is at least 13 years old; you should also be aware that BBCOR certification is the current standard utilized when manufacturing baseball bats for adults (those who are 13 years old or older). Make certain that the bat is BBCOR approved before using it in NFHS or NCAA leagues; otherwise, you will not be able to play.

What is BBCOR?

If you’re actually interested in knowing. Its abbreviation, BBCOR, refers for “batted ball coefficient of resolution,” which is a metric that is determined using the trampoline effect created by the bat. Specifically, this standard was established to restrict the amount of energy lost when the baseball is struck by the bat.

The National Federation of State High School Associations and the National Collegiate Athletic Association designated 0.50 as the maximum value that a bat may obtain. Aside from that, BBCOR accreditation requires a bat to meet certain requirements.

  • It must have a barrel diameter that does not exceed 2 5/8 inches, a length that does not exceed 36 inches, and a length to weight ratio that does not exceed -3

A barrel diameter that does not exceed 2 5/8 inches; a length that does not exceed 36 inches; and a length to weight ratio that is not larger than -3 are all requirements.

How to Choose the Right Size?

When it comes to selecting the greatest baseball bat, there are various variables to consider:

1.Length of the Bat

You may use the following table to determine the optimum bat length based on the age of the player: Longer bats allow players to have a greater range of motion, but they are also heavier, which might have an impact on swinging mechanics. Obviously, while looking for the best bat for your athlete, you must take both length and weight into consideration.

2.Weight of the Bat

There is a widespread perception that bigger players should use a heavier bat in order to obtain maximum power, while smaller players should use a lighter bat in order to optimize speed and agility. Even while this may be the beginning point for your quest for the greatest youth baseball bat, it is not always the case. Weightier bats can be difficult to manage, and if a player hits too many foul balls, he or she may lose his or her motivation. A bat that is excessively light, on the other hand, will not provide your youngster with the best possible performance since it will reduce potential acceleration and power.

The key is to discover the drop weight of your player’s bat that is optimal for him.

What does drop weight of a baseball bat mean?

The drop weight of a baseball bat is defined as the difference between the length (measured in inches) and the weight (measured in ounces) of the ball.

Which drop weight should my child use?

The drop weight fluctuates as the player’s skill level, strength level, and age level increase.

  • -10 or -12 drop weight youth baseball bats are recommended for beginner players who are just getting their feet wet in the sport. Youth baseball gloves are also recommended. These are drop weights that are intended for children who are just starting out in baseball. High School– According to BBCOR rules, high school and college baseball players are only permitted to use bats with a drop weight of no more than -3 pounds.

However, as you can see, although finding the greatest batting gloves is quite simple, selecting the most suited baseball bat is a time-consuming procedure. The player will have to experiment with several (if not a large number) of bats until he discovers the one that is the most comfortable for him.

The weight test

There is a simple exercise that may be used to determine whether or not the bat is too heavy for the hitter. During the 15-20-second holding period, ask your athlete to hold the bat out in front of him with one hand. It is recommended that you hold the bat with one hand, right above the handle. If he can keep his bat from falling or his arm from shaking for a whole 20 seconds, there is a strong probability you’ve identified the greatest baseball bat for that athlete. If you notice that the bat is dropping or that your arm is shaking, you should use a lighter bat.

3.Barrel Size

Players under the age of 12 should utilize a 2 1/4″ barrel, according to the manufacturer. That is the typical size for baseball in the youth and little league programs. Currently, high school and college hitters are only permitted to use bats with a maximum barrel diameter of 2 5/8″. The following graphic was created by the professionals at Source for Sports, taking into consideration both barrel size and drop weight: Please keep in mind that this is a chart displaying the suggested sizes only.

They can differ from player to player, but they must all adhere to the same set of rules in order to play.

Types of Bats to Choose From

Metal bats may be classified into four categories based on the material that was used in their construction: Alloy bats, composite bats, half-and-half bats, and hybrid bats are all options. Bats are available in two different configurations: one-piece and two-piece. Those who like one-piece bats argue that they have a greater trampoline effect because they have a bit more flex in the handle, which can make them go faster. A composite of fiberglass-like material is used to construct composite bats, which are often the most costly.

  • The break-in time is critical for them, and it is advised that they smash 200 to 300 genuine baseballs all over the barrel to obtain the best performance out of a composite bat during this period.
  • Alloy bats (which are normally the least costly, but there are always exceptions) are manufactured entirely of metal, with the exception of the end cap.
  • That’s because aluminum is both lightweight and sturdy, making it the greatest child baseball bat available.
  • As well, they give higher speed, which helps to compensate for the lack of precision and strength in certain younger players.
  • Hybrid bats are made out of a variety of blended materials, including as alloys and carbon fiber.
  • A price comparison must be made while purchasing anything, whether it is batting gloves, baseball sunglasses, catcher gear, or any other item that comes to mind.
  • In most cases, though, you tend to get what you pay for, and more costly alloys should deliver higher performance.
  • Aluminum bats, for example, are ideal for younger players who are just beginning their baseball careers, despite the fact that they are more expensive than composite bats.
  • Baseball has always been a passion of mine, and it has played a role in my life from infancy to the present.

I enjoy sharing information about baseball with people, and I want to do so in the future. I feel that the assistance of other baseball bloggers, such as myself, will help to spread the enthusiasm.

Baseball Bat Buying Guide

The weight of a bat is measured in ounces (oz.). The weight of a bat is sometimes determined by its “weight drop,” which is the difference between its length in inches and its weight in ounces. Using the example of a 32-inch, 22-ounce bat, the term “-10 bat” would be used to refer to the bat.

BAT LENGTH (IN.) – BAT WEIGHT (OZ.) = WEIGHT DROP

As a general rule of thumb, the higher the level of competition or league (i.e., from kids league to professional), the greater the weight loss. A smaller weight decrease suggests that the bat seems to be heavier. As a result, a -5 bat will feel significantly heavier than a -10 bat. The correct bat weight is determined by three key considerations: the sport, the league rules, and the player’s personal choice.

  • Leagues have regulations that specify which weight drops are permissible for use during games. We recommend that you check with your league to see if there is a specific requirement for bat weight decreases that must be met in order for them to be approved before making your purchase. Batting lighter is more common among players with less experience, which allows them to maintain greater bat control. More experienced players like to use heavier bats in order to enhance their strength and power. Swing speed is a good indicator of whether or not a bat is suited for you. A bat that is overly heavy makes it more difficult to swing, resulting in a loss of momentum, reduced distance, or a complete miss. If a player uses a bat that is too light for him or her, he or she may miss out on the extra force that a heavier bat would provide. It is necessary to find a happy medium. In order to establish the ideal weight for you, it is strongly advised that you demo a bat against live pitching speeds.

The most typical weight reductions in various baseball leagues are -12, -10, -9, -8, -5, and -3 pounds per kilogram of body weight. As you move through high school baseball, the weight loss becomes less significant (the bats become heavier). When upgrading to a heavier bat, you may elect to shorten the length of the bat by an inch or two in order to more easily manage the added weight. As you improve in age, league, and talent level, this is a question of personal choice and comfort at the plate that you should consider.

Baseball Bat Sizes: Bat Sizing Charts for Baseball & Softball

  • Over the last two decades, new technology has fundamentally altered the way baseball bats and softball bats are manufactured. Bats are no longer only made of aluminum, but may also be constructed of composite materials, which are well-known for having a material that the ball leaps off of when it hits it. In addition, there are rigorous rules about the kind of bats that can be used based on the age of the player. Even though purchasing a new baseball or softball bat for your 8-year-old or high schooler might be intimidating, the following information can make the process a little less stressful for you. You’ll learn about the following things from this guide: Using the following table, you may determine the length of the bat you should purchase after measuring yourself or your child: Although there are several methods for determining the optimal baseball bat length, the most effective method is to pick a length that you feel comfortable swinging. A typical rule to follow is to never go more than an inch at a time when climbing a ladder. This makes it easy to become used to your new bat without having to substantially alter your swing. When starting off in the game or resizing oneself, the methods outlined below will teach you how to properly measure yourself:
  • Measure from the middle of your chest to the tips of your index fingers, ensuring sure your arm is straight out to your side while you do so: Having determined the suitable bat size to use by calculating all of the figures and consulting the bat length chart above, there are a few extra techniques to check whether or not the size you picked is correct:
  1. Baseball bats and softball bats have seen significant changes as a result of new technologies in the previous two decades. A composite bat, which is recognized for being a material that allows the ball to leap off of it, can be used to replace aluminum bats in some cases. Depending on the age of the player, there are also tight rules on the kind of bats that can be used in the game. Even though purchasing a new baseball or softball bat for your 8-year-old or high schooler might be intimidating, the following information can make the process a little less stressful for you and your child. You’ll learn about the following things from this guide. This chart will tell you the length of the bat you should search for once you have measured yourself or your youngster. Despite the fact that there are several methods for determining the optimal baseball bat length, the most effective method is to pick a length that you are most comfortable with. As a general guideline, never go more than an inch at a time when you are climbing stairs. In this way, you may more easily acclimatize to your new bat without having to change your swing much. When starting off in the game or resizing oneself, the methods outlined below will teach you how to properly measure yourself: Measure from the middle of your chest to the tips of your index fingers, ensuring sure your arm is straight out to your side while you do so. Having determined the suitable bat size to use by calculating all of the figures and consulting the bat length chart above, there are a few extra techniques to determine whether or not the size you picked is appropriate:

How to Measure Your Child for a Youth Bat

In the case of purchasing abat for your child, the method of measuring will be a bit different. If your young kid is between the heights of 3′ and 3’4″, start with a 26-inch bat and raise the size of the bat by one inch for every 4- to 5-inch rise in height. The procedures outlined below are the most effective method of identifying the appropriate youth bat size for children:

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Choosing the Correct Length Youth Bat: Measure His/Her Height

Make certain that his or her baseball cleats are on when you measure. Place a bat next to your youngster and ask him or her to compare himself or herself to the bat. Your child’s hip should be reached by the bat, but not exceeded. Unless it extends over his or her hip area, it will be too lengthy to swing effectively.

Choosing the Correct Weight Youth Bat: Weigh Him/Her

He/she should consider their weight while choosing which bat to swing because the little league bat size chart takes into consideration their weight and height in order to establish the most appropriate bat size. Generally speaking:

  • Children weighing less than 60 pounds should use a bat that is between 26 and 29 inches in length
  • Children weighing more than 70 pounds should use a bat that is between 28 and 32 inches in length.

What is Bat Drop?

The negative or drop weight is used to determine the bat weight. When you measure drop weight, you are comparing the difference between the bat’s length and weight. For example, a bat that is 30 inches long with a drop weight of -10 will weigh 20 ounces. The greater the size of the drop weight, the lighter the bat will be in weight. Keep in mind that only high school baseball bats and college baseball bats are subject to regulation, and their drops must be no greater than -3. If you are a powerful player, it is reasonable to anticipate that you will require a heavier bat.

You’ll want to choose a bat that permits you to achieve the optimal amount of bat speed through the zone while still swinging it.

The length of the bat must be taken into consideration in order to determine the weight of the bat once a baseline has been established for that length.

They may not be able to lift a heavier bat, thus they would need a bat with a greater weight drop. Achieving the proper balance between length and weight is critical for the proper performance of your swing since it has an impact on its physics. Take, for example, the following example:

  • The inertia of a long, light bat will allow you to swing the bat very quickly, but the bat will not have much inertia behind it. Using a short, heavy bat, you will not have the fastest bat speed, but you will have a lot of inertia on your side of the ball.

Choosing the length and weight of the bat with which you swing is a personal decision; you should experiment with different combinations of what feels comfortable with the type of player you want to be. As a contact hitter, you won’t be concerned about losing inertia with your swing, but if you want to hit for power like Giancarlo Stanton and swing for the fences, you’ll want the inertia that a shorter, heavier bat will provide you with. Refer to the table below to get a general sense of the type of bat drop you should be employing.

Bat Sizing Charts by Age and League

While the allowed drop weight varies from league to league, the length of the bat may be generalized based on the age of the participants. The following charts show the predicted bat size ranges for child leagues according on age groups, ranging from Under 7 (5/6) to Under 13 (13). Using the following table, you may determine the appropriate size baseball bat for your boy or daughter:

Youth Baseball Bat Sizing Chart by Age (7-13 years old)

While the allowed drop weight varies from league to league, the length of the bat may be generalized based on the age of the players involved in the league. Under 7 (5/6) to 13 years old are represented in the following charts, which show the usual bat sizes for young leagues. Using the following table, you can figure out what size baseball bat your boy or daughter should use.

Little League Bat Size Chart

Age Under 7 8-9 10-11 12-13
Length 24″-26″ 26″-29″ 28″-30″ 29″-32″
Drop (-13.5)-(-12) (-13.5)-(-10) (-13)-(-10) (-10)-(-9)

High School and College Bat Sizing by Age

While the permitted drop weight varies from league to league, the length of the bat may be generalized by age group. The following charts show the predicted bat size ranges for child leagues according on age groups, ranging from Under 7 (5/6) to Under 13 (13 years). Using the following table, you may determine what size baseball bat your boy or girl should use:

High School and College Bat Size Chart

Age 14-15 16-18 18 and Over
Length 31″-33″ 32″-34″ 32″-34″
Drop (-3) (-3) (-3)

Fastpitch Softball Bat Sizing by Age

Finally, we have a fastpitch softball bat sizing chart that is broken down by age. As players get older, their bats become longer and heavier, and their bat drop decreases (difference between length and weight).

Fastpitch Softball Bat Size Chart

Age Under 7 8-9 10-11 12-13 14 and Over
Length 24″-26″ 26″-29″ 28″-31″ 29″-33″ 31″-34″
Drop (-13.5)-(-10) (-13.5)-(-10) (-13)-(-8) (-12)-(-8) (-10)-(-8)

Bat Size Rules and Regulations

Recent rule modifications have been implemented in most leagues in an effort to make the game safer and more competitive. This is why new bats must meet stricter safety requirements, and all players are required to adhere to these guidelines going forward.

USA Baseball Bats

Beginning on January 1, 2018, a new USA Baseball Bat Standard will be implemented by a number of youth baseball organizations. With this regulation adjustment, the goal is to make the game more consistent while still ensuring the long-term integrity of the game. Several baseball organizations, including Little League, Babe Ruth, PONY, the American Amateur Baseball Congress, the Cal Ripken Baseball Foundation, and Dixie Youth, have adopted this revised bat standard.

According to the new regulation modification, T-Ballbats will also be affected. The new USA baseball bats are available in a variety of barrel sizes ranging from 2 1/4″ to 2 5/8″. The weight decreases might range from -13.5 pounds to a maximum of -5 pounds.

Big Barrel Bats for Pony Leagues

The new USA Baseball Bat regulation adjustment was not adopted by the United States Softball Association (USSSA). The rules for USSSA bats have not altered, and they will continue to utilize baseball bats that have been approved by the USSSA. Bats with the “USSSA 1.15 BPF” sticker on them will be legal for use in USSSA competition. The barrel diameter of these bats ranges from 2 5/8″ to 2 3/4″. The weight reductions range from -12 to -5 pounds. USSSA bats are no longer permitted for use in leagues that play under the new USA Baseball Bat Standard, which was implemented in January.

High School and College Bats (BBCOR)

BBCOR (Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution) certified bats are required for all high school and collegiate baseball bats. In order to obtain BCCOR certification, baseball bats must meet a revised measuring standard, which has superseded the previous BESR (Bat Exit Speed Ratio) Certification. Look for the certification stamp on the right-hand side of the page. When the bat and ball collide, this standard is intended to evaluate the trampoline effect of the bat and ball, rather than simply measuring the departure speed of the ball.

High school and college bats should have a -3 weight drop to meet league requirements, and they can range in size from 31″ to 34″.

Fastpitch and Slowpitch Softball Bats

When selecting a fastpitchorslowpitchsoftball bat, you should consider which league you will be playing in and which bat restrictions you will need to follow. It is advisable to double-check your league’s rules before purchasing a bat, as ASA bats are not permitted in USSSA play and vice versa unless the bat has a dual stamp on the bottom.

Types and Materials of Bats

Now that you’ve determined the length, weight, and league type that you’ll want for your new bat, it’s time to choose a material for it. At the amateur level, there are often three options:

Composite Bats vs. Alloy Bats vs. Hybrid Bats

When it comes to selecting the material for your bat, the choice is very straightforward: either wood or non-wood is acceptable. Wood is normally reserved for the pros, practice bats, and competitions, with the exception of those states that require its usage in certain situations. However, after you’ve decided on a non-wood bat, the task of selecting a bat material might seem daunting. You may use the chart below as a fast reference guide to help you recall the distinctions: It might be difficult to choose which sort of bat is the most appropriate for your needs.

Composite Bats

Composite bats are comprised of a layered material, similar to carbon fiber, that allows the bat’s weight distribution to be easily controlled. Composite bats are used in baseball and softball. Depending on the style, manufacturers can create balanced bats (in which the weight is uniformly distributed) or end-loaded bats (in which the weight is concentrated at the end of the barrel, resulting in a larger swing weight).

Pros of Composite Bats

  • It is possible to adjust the weight distribution of a composite bat since it is built of a layered material comparable to carbon fiber. Composite bats are used in baseball and softball. A balanced bat (in which the weight is uniformly distributed throughout the barrel) or an end-loaded bat (in which the weight is concentrated at the end of the barrel, providing a larger swing weight) can be produced depending on the style.

Cons of Composite Bats

  • Composite bats are comprised of a layered material, similar to carbon fiber, that allows the weight distribution of the bat to be easily controlled. Depending on the style, manufacturers can build bats that are balanced (in which the weight is uniformly distributed) or end-loaded (in which the weight is concentrated at the end of the barrel, resulting in a larger swing weight).
  • It is recommended that you hit between 150 and 200 times using a conventional baseball or softball, rather than a rubber batting cage ball. Each time you hit the ball, slightly rotate the bat to ensure that it is evenly broken in
  • This will ensure that your bat lasts a long time.

The method outlined above is the only one that is suggested for breaking in your composite bat.

Hitting your bat against a tree or rolling it are not suggested since they will cause damage to the bat and void the manufacturer’s warranty, respectively. More information may be found by following our step-by-step instructions on how to break in a composite bat.

Alloy bats

Alloy bats, also known as metal and aluminum bats, have been around for a longer period of time than composite bats have.

Pros of Alloy Bats

  • They tend to be less expensive than composite bats
  • They do not require a break-in period, which means they are ready to use immediately out of the package
  • And they do not require a break-in period. In many cases, they survive longer than other materials, and even when they are damaged, they dent rather than fracture. This implies that even if they are damaged, they may still be used, whereas composite bats cannot be used after they have cracked. As long as a barrel ring can be used to secure the bat to the barrel, it will be regarded lawful to use.

Cons of Alloy Bats

These bats are often less expensive than composite bats; they do not require a break-in period, which means they are ready to use immediately out of the package; and they do not require a break-in period. They normally have a longer lifespan, and even if they are damaged, they dent rather than fracture, according to the manufacturer. In other words, even if they are damaged, composite bats may still be used; but, if they are broken, composite bats cannot be used anymore. As long as a barrel ring can be used to secure the bat to the barrel, it will be regarded legal to possess.

Hybrid Bats

Hybrid bats are baseball bats that combine a composite handle with an alloy barrel to form a single baseball ball bat. This design blends the advantages of a light composite handle with the durability of an alloy barrel to provide the best of both worlds for the player and the game.

Pros of Hybrid Bats

  • Hybrid bats are often less expensive than composite bats
  • Nevertheless, composite bats are more expensive. Because to the composite handle, there is a lighter sensation when swinging. Hybrid bats, like aluminum bats, are ready to use straight away and do not require any breaking in time. Hybrid bats tend to be more durable than composite bats
  • Composite bats are less durable than hybrid bats.

Cons of Hybrid Bats

  • In certain leagues, it is not permitted
  • In the same way as composite bats are subject to cracking and temperature hazards, handle is also sensitive.

One-piece Bats vs. Two-piece Bats

  • One-piece bats are often stiffer and more balanced than two-piece bats. Because the one-piece construction does not allow for more vibration control, they will frequently experience excessive vibration on miss-hit balls. Two-piece bats tend to have more flex and less vibration than three-piece bats

Top Baseball Bat Brands

Generally speaking, contact hitters gain more from one-piece bats because of the improved balance, but power hitters benefit more from two-piece bats because of the extra flexibility. The decision between the two is depends on your personal preference as well as your striking style. Knowing what sort of baseball or softball bat you’ll need to start swinging is a good start. Come check out our assortment ofbaseball bats and softball bats to choose a fresh new bat for yourself or the young athlete in your life.

To learn more about our products and services, stop by one of our retail locations or give us a call.

Bat and Glove Size Chart

If your youngster requires a new bat or glove this season, you may use the following charts as a reference to assist you:

Bats:

Determine Your BatLength by Age
Age Bat length
5-7 years old 24″-26″
8-9 years old 26″-28″
10 years old 28″-29″
11-12 years old 30″-31″
13-14 years old 31″-32″
15-16 years old 32″-33″
17 years old 34″
Determine Your BatLength by Weight and Height
Your height (inches)
Your weight (pounds) 36-40 41-44 45-48 49-52 53-56 57-60 61-64 65-68 69-72 73
Bat length
less than 60 26″ 27″ 28″ 29″ 29″
61-70 27″ 27″ 28″ 29″ 30″ 30″
71-80 28″ 28″ 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″
81-90 28″ 29″ 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″ 32″
91-100 28″ 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″ 31″ 32″
101-110 29″ 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″ 31″ 32″
111-120 29″ 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″ 31″ 32″
121-130 29″ 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″ 32″ 33″ 33″
131-140 29″ 30″ 30″ 31″ 31″ 32″ 33″ 33″
141-150 30″ 30″ 31″ 31″ 32″ 33″ 33″
151-160 30″ 31″ 31″ 32″ 32″ 33″ 33″ 33″
161-170 31″ 31″ 32″ 32″ 33″ 33″ 34″
171-180 32″ 33″ 33″ 34″ 34″
180 33″ 33″ 34″ 34″

Gloves:

Sizing Chart
Age Position Glove size
Under 8 Infield 9 inches
Under 8 Outfield 11 inches
9-13 Infield 9-10 inches
9-13 Outfield 11-12 inches
High School/Adult Infield 10 1/2-11 1/2 inches
High School/Adult Outfield 12-12 1/2 inches

Fit Tips

  • In the case of youth and beginners, gloves that are excessively large allow for “cheating,” which prevents them from establishing and honing correct abilities early on. Gloves for children should not be purchased with the intention of growing into them. The most effective approach to master the fundamentals of fielding and catching is to practice with a glove that is properly fitted. Children under the age of 12: No more than 12 inches in height. Children aged 8 and over should experiment with gloves in the 11-inch range, while younger children (particularly those who are smaller) may explore gloves in the 9- to 11-inch range. Adolescent: For your position, choose a size that is at the lower end of the adult size range.
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NLL is not responsible for any wrong purchases. We just provide this information to help those that don’t know where to start.

Youth Baseball Bat Size Chart, Baseball & Softball Bat Sizing Guide

Over the last decade or so, advances in technology have fundamentally altered the way baseball and softball bats are manufactured and used. Bats are no longer built only of aluminum, as they were in the past; instead, they now incorporate Composite Technology, which helps the barrel to compress more, allowing the ball to bounce farther. The process of shopping for a new baseball bat, whether in a store or online, may get difficult because to the variety of bat sizes, drops, styles, and barrel sizes available.

HOW TO MEASURE YOURSELF FOR A BAT:

Despite the fact that there are several methods for determining your ideal bat length, the most effective one is to just pick up the bat and swing it around. The ability to choose a proper beginning place can be derived from charts and the knowledge of coaches and parents, but just swinging the bat will always bring you where you need to go without causing any headaches or discomfort. Oh, and don’t forget to remember. That is the most enjoyable part! If you are new to baseball or simply want to obtain a solid idea of where you should be beginning from, the methods outlined below should help: 1.Weigh and measure your own body weight!

As a result of this measurement, you will know where to look on the chart below: Assuming you’ve determined the right bat size to use by calculating all of the measures and weights shown in the table above, there are several more techniques to determine whether or not a certain bat will work for you.

You should be OK with the length of your reach as long as your palm reaches the handle. 3.Tuck the Knob into your chest (in the centre of it) and stretch out with your arm; if you can grip the barrel with your arm, the length should be suitable.

HOW TO MEASURE CHILDREN FOR THE APPROPRIATE BAT:

1) Place the youngster in their cleats (they will be wearing them during the game) and measure his or her height. 2.Have him/her stand close to the bats end cap, which should be level on the ground. If the bat knob extends beyond the child’s hip, it may be too lengthy for him or her. 3.Weigh your child; the height and weight table above serves as an excellent beginning point for determining the right bat size for your youngster.

  • A youngster weighing less than 60 pounds will typically swing a bat that is between 26 and 29 inches in length. If he or she weighs more over 70 pounds, he or she will often be able to swing a 28-32 inch bat.

*Please keep in mind that these are only recommendations and are not intended to be flawless. The most accurate technique to size a youngster is to have them swing friends’ bats until they discover one that is comfortable for them. Seeking further information on which penalty your child should receive? Look no further. Please visit this page to view our Baseball and Softball Bat Sizing Guide for 2020. This tutorial will lead you through the various league fines as well as a more in-depth explanation on the different sorts of bats and drops.

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Bat Size Chart – The Right Size The First Time

In your opinion, what is a decent bat size chart? The majority of bat size charts do not take into account all of the aspects that must be considered while choosing the proper size bat. In the first place, determining a bat size based on age and weight does not take into consideration elements such as sport (baseball or fastpitch), age, drop and league (BBCOR, USSSA, etc). Finding the appropriate size bat is dependent on a number of factors, all of which are taken into account in our bat size tables.

The simplicity of bat size charts lends them an attraction of their own.

The alternative, though, is to rush to an online retailer after simply checking a bat size chart you obtained on the internet, which will almost certainly end in disappointment.

Bat Chart Fitting Examples

Based on the chart above, which is one of the most accurate two-dimensional bat size charts available, here are some samples of what size bat you may receive as a result of your purchase. Because they are imprecise estimates, as we said above, they are not likely to be the best option for players that suit these proportions on a regular basis.

  • A 3’6′′ player weighing 61 pounds with a 27-inch bat
  • A 3’10” player weighing 75 pounds with a 28-inch bat
  • A 4’1′′ player weighing 115 pounds with a 30-inch bat
  • A 4’4′′ player weighing 120 pounds with a 30-inch bat
  • A 4’6′′ player weighing 100 pounds with a 30-inch bat
  • A 4’11” player weighting 130 pounds with a 31-inch bat

In order to demonstrate why these bat length recommendations are just incorrect, it is not difficult to come up with illustrative instances.

Most Misunderstood Principle: Swing Weight vs Total Weight

To comprehend a bat size chart, it is essential to realize that swing weight is far more beneficial than overall weight or length, respectively. Weight distribution and quantity of weight in bats are both vary in various species.

  • The way the weight is distributed impacts how difficult it is to swing a bat. For example, bats with the same overall weight do not always have the same swing. In certain cases, they can be 10 to 15% heavier or lighter than a bat of the same overall weight
  • The difference between the scale weight and the printed weight isn’t really significant in most cases. While hitting a baseball or softball, the only thing that counts to a batter is the ease with which the bat may be swung forward. Despite the fact that scale weight is a determinant in how difficult a bat is to swing, no two bats are same. A baseball bat’s swinging difficulty is determined by the way the weight of the bat is distributed across the bat. Swing weight is the term used to describe this phenomena.

Factors that should Influence Bat Size Charts

It is important to be of legal age.

Actually, it is strength that is important. Age and strength, on the other hand, are generally substantially connected. To size a bat based solely on the intersection of height and weight, without taking age (or strength) into account, is to completely miss the purpose.

League

In this case, age is significant. Strength, on the other hand, is important. Age and strength, on the other hand, are frequently substantially connected. A bat’s size should be determined based on the intersection of height and weight, without taking age (or strength) into mind.

Fastpitch

Consider the fact that fastpitch bats, for example, are certified by the ASA and the USSSA. The American Softball Association (ASA) certifies high school players, but the United States Softball Association (USSSA) certifies more men’s fastpitch players. However, it has been shown that many bats hold both certificates. Some, however, do not. You wouldn’t be the first person to purchase a USSSA-only bat for use in an ASA league, would you?

USA

Bats in the United States are considered to be a separate species. These were introduced in 2018 and are necessary in a variety of settings, including Little League. The USSSA bat is not permitted in most leagues that need a USA Bat. However, certain USA leagues, particularly those catering to the 13/14-year-old market, let both USA and BBCOR bats to be used.

USSSA

The USSSA baseball tournament is the most frequent travel ball requirement for bats in the United States. However, the USA Bat is also required for a large number of competitive ball games. There is just no way to find out unless you inquire with the league in which you participate. Furthermore, the size for each differs because to the differences in drops and feel. It is not reasonable to expect a 30/20 USA model version to feel and swing identically to a 30/20 USSSA version of the same manufacture and model.

BBCOR

As the most popular portion, BBCOR serves practically any league that is 14 years old or older, making it the most widely used. The BBCOR standard, which is most well-known for being a prerequisite for high school and NCAA competition, is the adult, non-professional standard for aluminum and composite bats. To add to the confusion, single-piece wood bats are included in the BBCOR requirement, despite the fact that they do not require a stamp to be placed on the bat itself.

Wood

Wood bat leagues have a plethora of regulations to follow. When you know that not all wood bats are made equal, it becomes even more apparent that this is the case. Some wood bats are “composites,” which means they are made of many different materials. In other words, they are constructed from many pieces of wood that have been bonded together. Other “wood” bats aren’t really “wood” bats in the sense that they’re made of bamboo. Furthermore, bamboo is not recognized as a legitimate wood bat. Other “wood” bats aren’t actually made of wood at all, but rather of some strange resin that mimics the appearance of wood.

Skill Levels

What is most lacking in bat size charts is a reference to a player’s ability level.

The ability of a player has a significant impact on the length and size of the bat that should be used by that player. When determining the ideal size bat, the distinction is that talent is a more meaningful criterion than height/weight combination.

Drops

When looking at bat size charts, the drop is an important factor that is often overlooked. Instead, bat size charts are frequently limited to indicating the length of the bat. As you may or may not be aware, there are various different length to weight ratios available for baseball bats. Drop, as it is known in the industry, is an element of bats that may range from as little as 0 ounces in wood bats to as much as 14 ounces in tee ball bats. Simply expressed, the feel of a 31/28 ounce bat is very different from that of a 31/18 inch bat.

Bat Size Chart for 8 Year Old

In terms of height and weight, a typical 8-year-old boy is 4’11” and 50 pounds. The difference between above and below average SIZE would be no less than 10%, while the difference between above and below average would be 10%. Don’t spend too much time deliberating about this. A player who is taller than normal but weighs less than average might be considered exceptional. Take the typical size age that you are aware of and assess if your boy’s “size” is larger or less than the norm. Perhaps a BMI rating would be more appropriate in this case, but we are hoping that the honest seeker would be able to comprehend the meaning of being over or below averagesize.

Size Skill Level Ideal Bat Size Options (L/W)
Average + 10% Low 29/19 | 30/19 | 31/19
Average + 10% Good 30/20 | 31/20 | 31/21
Average + 10% Great 32/20 | 31/21 | 32/21
Average Low 28/18 | 29/18 | 30/18
Average Good 29/19 | 30/19 | 31/19
Average Great 30/20 | 31/21 | 32/21
Average – 10% Low 28/16 | 28/17 | 30/18
Average – 10% Average 29/17 | 29/18| 29/19
Average – 10% Great 29/19 | 30/20 | 31/20

Bat Size Chart for 9 Year Old

In terms of height and weight, the average 9-year-old male weighs 62 pounds and stands 4 feet 4 inches tall. The figures in the table below show the optimal bat sizes for bigger (+10 percent), average, and smaller (-10 percent) bats.

Size Skill Level Ideal Bat Size Options (L/W)
Average + 10% Low 29/19 | 30/19 | 31/19
Average + 10% Good 31/21 | 32/22 | 31/23
Average + 10% Great 32/22 | 31/23 | 32/24
Average Low 28/18 | 29/19 | 30/18
Average Good 30/21 | 31/21 | 32/21
Average Great 32/21 | 32/22 | 31/23
Average – 10% Low 29/18 | 29/19 | 30/19
Average – 10% Average 30/20 | 31/20 | 32/20
Average – 10% Great 31/21 | 32/21 | 30/22

Bat Size Chart for 10 Year Old

The average height and weight of a ten-year-old boy is 74 pounds and 4 feet 6.5 inches. This is indeed the ideal bat for a huge barrel or USA stick that you’ve been looking for. The majority of firms base their bat size chart on the player’s height and weight.

Size Skill Level Ideal Bat Size Options (L/W)
Average + 10% Low 30/20 | 31/20 | 32/20
Average + 10% Good 32/22 | 32/23 | 32/24
Average + 10% Great 30/25 | 32/24 | 32/24
Average Low 29/19 | 30/19 | 31/19
Average Good 30/22 | 32/22 | 31/23
Average Great 31/23 | 30/25 | 32/22
Average – 10% Low 30/18 | 30/20 | 30/20
Average – 10% Average 32/21 | 31/21 | 30/23
Average – 10% Great 30/25 | 32/22 | 31/23

Bat Size Chart for 12 Year Old

The typical size for a 12-year-old boy is 91 pounds and stands at 4 feet 11 inches in height. This combination of age and size significantly accelerates the transition from a drop 10 to a drop 8. Elite hitters in this area may also want to explore a drop 5, since it provides the most bang for their money, so to speak.

Size Skill Level Ideal Bat Size Options (L/W)
Average + 10% Low 31/21 | 31/20 | 32/20
Average + 10% Good 32/22 | 32/23 | 32/24
Average + 10% Great 30/25 | 31/26 | 32/24
Average Low 30/19 | 30/20 | 31/19
Average Good 31/22 | 32/22 | 31/23
Average Great 31/23 | 30/25 | 32/22
Average – 10% Low 31/19 | 30/20 | 31/21
Average – 10% Average 32/21 | 31/21 | 30/23
Average – 10% Great 30/25 | 32/22 | 31/23

Bat Size Chart for 13 Year Old

A lot of 13-year-old hitters aren’t going to be thrilled with the prospect of moving up to a heavier bat. However, in terms of their long-term growth, reaching a drop 5 (or at the very least a drop 8) will be beneficial. The average 13-year-old male weighs 100 pounds and is 5 feet 1.5 inches tall.

Size Skill Level Ideal Bat Size Options (L/W)
Average + 10% Low 31/26 | 32/22 | 32/24
Average + 10% Good 31/23 | 32/24 | 31/26
Average + 10% Great 31/26 | 32/27 | 33/28
Average Low 31/21 | 31/22 | 30/25
Average Good 31/22 | 32/22 | 31/23
Average Great 31/23 | 31/26 | 32/24
Average – 10% Low 31/19 | 30/20 | 31/21
Average – 10% Average 32/21 | 31/21 | 30/23
Average – 10% Great 30/25 | 32/27 | 31/23

BBCOR Bat Size Chart for High School BBCOR

BBCOR bats are excessively identical in size, yet high school players come in an equally insane variety of styles. Depending on the model, BBCOR bats can weigh anywhere from 26 ounces (a few are 29/26) to 31 ounces (the 34/31). We categorize this by age, but make careful to account for differences in skill level as well.

Age Skill Level Ideal Bat Size Options (L/W)
14 – 15 Low 30/27
14 – 15 Good 31/28
14- 15 Great 32/29
16 – 17 Low 32/29
16 – 17 Good 33/30
16 – 17 Great 34/31
18+ Low 33/30
18+ Average 33/30
18+ Great 34/27

Traditional Bat Size Chart

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